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Full text of "University of New Haven Undergraduate Catalog, 1976-77"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/universityof197677univ 



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University of 
NEW HAVEN 



1976-77 

Undergraduate 

Catalog 




The University of New Haven does not discriminate on the 
basis of race, sex, religion, national origin or handicap in 
admissions or treatment of employees. 

* * 

The male generic terms appearing throughout this book 
refer to both males and females and are used for gram- 
matical simplicity and semantic convenience. 

ii 



Table of Contents 

Academic Calendar .iv 

General Information 1 

Divisions of the University 5 

Undergraduate Admission 9 

Scholastic Regulations 13 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 21 

Financial Aid 26 

Student Activities and Facilities 32 

Academic Programs 

School of Arts and Sciences 43 

School of Business Administration 139 

School of Engineering ;191 

The Board of Governors 235 

Administration 237 

Advisory Councils 246 

Faculty 253 

Index 267 



lU 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



FALL SEMESTER 1976 



* Tuition due from all students 


Mon. 


Aug. 9 


Residence charges due 


Mon. 


Aug. 9 


Holiday (Labor Day) 


Mon. 


Sept. 6 


Classes begin 


Tues. 


Sept. 7 


Orientation for first year students 


Tues.-Fri. 


Sept. 7-10 


Last day to ADD courses 


Fri. 


Sept. 17 


Last day to petition for 






January graduation 


Fri. 


Oct. 15 


Last day to DROP courses 


Fri. 


Oct. 22 


Spring Registration (no classes) 


Tues.-Wed. 


Nov. 16-17 


Thanksgiving Holiday 


Thurs.-Sun. 


Nov. 25-28 


Classes end 


Fri. 


Dec. 17 


Final Examinations 


Mon.-Thurs. 


Dec. 20-23 


Last day of semester 


Thurs. 


Dec. 23 


Commencement 


Sun. 


Jan. 23, 1977 


SPRING SEMESTER 1977 






* Tuition due from all students 


Mon. 


Jan. 3 


Residence charges due 


Mon. 


Jan. 3 


Orientation for new students 


Tues. 


Jan. 18 


Classes begin 


Wed. 


Jan. 19 


Last day to ADD courses 


Fri. 


Jan. 28 


Holiday (Washington's Birthday) 


Mon. 


Feb. 21 


Last day to petition for June 






graduation 


Tues. 


Mar. 1 


Last day to DROP courses 


Fri. 


Mar. 4 


Spring vacation 


Sun.-Sun. 


Mar. 13-20 


Classes resume 


Mon. 


Mar. 21 


Holiday (Easter) 


Fri.-Sun. 


Apr. 8-10 


Fall Registration (no classes) 


Wed.-Thurs. 


Apr. 13-14 


Classes end 


Mon. 


May 9 


Reading Period (no classes) 


Tues.-Wed. 


May 10-11 


Final Examinations 


Thurs.-Wed. 


May 12-18 


Last day of semester 


Wed. 


May 18 


Commencement 


Sun. 


June 5 



IV 



Evening College Calendar 1976-1977 

FALL SEMESTER 1976 

Registration for current and 

former students 
Registration for new students 

Tuition due on or before 
Classes begin 
Holiday (Labor Day) 
Last day to ADD courses 
Mid-semester 

Last day to DROP courses 
Holiday (Thanksgiving) 
Classes end 
Final Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER 1977 

Registration for current and 

former students 
Registration for new students 
Tuition due on or before 
Classes begin 
Last day to ADD courses 
Holiday (Washington's Birthday) 
Mid-semester 

Last day to DROP courses 
Spring vacation 
Classes resume 
Holiday (Good Friday) 
Classes end 
Final examinations 
C ommencement 

SUMMER SESSION 1977 

Registration period 

Tuition due on or before 
Classes begin 

Holiday (Independence Day) 
First term final examinations 
Second term classes begin 
Second term final examinations 



Mon.-Fri. 


Aug. 16-27 


Tues.-Wed. 


Aug. 31- 




Sept. 1 


Fri. 


Sept. 3 


Fri. 


Sept. 3 


Mon. 


Sept. 6 


Fri. 


Sept. 17 


Fri. 


Oct. 29 


Wed.-Sun. 


Nov. 24-28 


Thurs. 


Dec. 16 


Fri.-Thurs. 


Dec. 17-23 


Mon.-Mon. 


Jan. 3-10 


Mon.-Tues. 


Jan. 10-11 


Fri. 


Jan. 14 


Fri. 


Jan. 14 


Sat. 


Jan. 29 


Mon. 


Feb. 21 


Sat. 


Mar. 5 


Sun.-Sun. 


Mar. 13-20 


Mon. 


Mar. 21 


Fri. 


Apr. 8 


Sat. 


May 7 


Mon.-Sat. 


May 9-14 


Sun. 


June 5 


Tues.-Fri. 


May 31- 




June 10 


Fri. 


June 10 


Mon. 


June 13 


Mon. 


July 4 


Mon. 


July 18 


Thurs. 


July 21 


Wed. 


Aug. 24 












■-i 



M^SIMllK. 






GENERAL INFORMATION 

History of the University 

Founded as a branch of Northeastern University, run by the 
New Haven YMCA, the University of New Haven has since grown 
into a major urban, coeducational, private institution. 

From 1920, the year of its founding, until 1958, growth of the 
school was very slow, hampered by a lack of facilities. Classes were 
held in space rented from Yale University. A new era began in 1958, 
when New Haven YMCA Junior College constructed a classroom 
building in New Haven, the first permanent home the college ever 
had. 

In 1959, the Connecticut Legislature granted the college inde- 
pendence and empowered the school to offer a four-year program 
leading to a Bachelor's degree. The name was changed to New 
Haven College. The student body still numbered less than two 
hundred students, yet the facilities in downtown New Haven were 
becoming overcrowded. The Board of Governors realized that, if the 
college was to serve the educational demands of the area and grow to 
its full potential, new quarters must be found. Their search took 
them a short distance west. 

On a hill in West Haven, three buildings, once the New Haven 
County Orphanage, stood vacant. Well aware of the limited re- 
sources of the college, the Board of Governors made a successful bid 
for the property, winning out over a proposed shopping center and 
parking lot. The future of New Haven College was assured. 

Programs for full time students were introduced and new 
courses were made available in other credit and non-credit cur- 
ricula. The combination of greatly increased classroom space and 
the four-year degree program sparked a period of tremendous 
growth in enrollment and facilities. In 1961, the year after the 



college moved to West Haven, the graduating class numbered 
seventy-five. Fourteen years later, that figure had climbed to one 
thousand. 

The acquisition of 28 acres of undeveloped land near the main 
campus in 1962 made possible construction of playing fields, tennis 
courts, and a new Physical Education-Auditorium Building. In Oc- 
tober 1974, the new Marvin K. Peterson Library was completed. 

The College received full accreditation in 1966 when the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges accredited its bac- 
calaureate programs. Full accreditation enabled the college to work 
more effectively towards the achievement of its principal objectives: 
to provide leaders and professional personnel with an understand- 
ing of important cultural and scientific progress and to encourage 
students to reach the maximum of their potential. 

A new and major addition to the college came in 1969 when the 
Graduate School was established with programs offered initially in 
business administration and industrial engineering. The Graduate 
School expanded rapidly, adding new programs and increasing its 
enrollment to the present level of more then 1,500 students. 

In 1970, the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the college, 
the name was changed to the University of New Haven. This change 
reflected the scope and diversity of the academic programs offered. 

Originally founded to meet a single distinct need in the New 
Haven community, the university is now a major academic institu- 
tion offering programs in more than fifty different areas of study, 
an academic diversity which provides a total educational experi- 
ence for its students. Although most of the student body attend 
classes on the Main Campus in West Haven, the university has 
carried its academic programs to the entire southern Connecticut 
area through the establishment of off-campus programs. 

Planning for future growth currently centers around the Cam- 
paign for Excellence, a multi-purpose capital fund campaign and 
long-range development program designed to achieve several ob- 
jectives: the construction of a University Center, a classroom build- 
ing for the arts and sciences containing an auditorium for the per- 
forming arts and a conference center; endowments for scholarships 
and faculty chairs; monies for the modernization of physical facili- 
ties and campus expansion; and an endowment to expand library 
resources and improve laboratory facilities. The Campaign for Ex- 
cellence opens a new chapter in our history. 



Accreditation 

The University of New Haven is a coeducational, nonsectarian, 
private institution of higher learning chartered by the General 
Assembly of the State of Connecticut and fully accredited by the 
Connecticut Commission for Higher Education. The university 
holds membership in the New England Association of Schools and 
Colleges, the Association of American Colleges, the Connecticut 
Conference of Independent Colleges, the College Entrance Examin- 
ing Board and is a member of regional and national professional 
organizations. 

The New England Association of Schools and Colleges accredits 
schools and colleges in the six New England states. Membership in 
one of the six regional accrediting associations in the United States 
indicates that the school or college has been carefully evaluated and 
found to meet standards agreed upon by qualified educators. 



Advanced Placement 

The university recognizes the program of advanced placement 
available to talented high school students, operated by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Students satisfactorily completing 
advanced placement courses in high school and the final examina- 
tion prepared by the Educational Testing Service may be given 
appropriate college credit if their courses are similar to those offered 
at the University of New Haven. 

Advanced placement courses are graded from 1 to 5. Credit is 
allowed where the grade earned is 3, 4 or 5. Credit may be given for a 
grade of 2 if a careful review of the test by this university deter- 
mines acceptability. No credit will be allowed for a grade of 1. 
Students desiring to submit advanced placement courses for college 
credit should have all results of these courses and tests sent in with 
their application to the Admissions Office. 

The University of New Haven accepts credit by examination 
from the College Level Examination Program (CLEP). The passing 
percentile for CLEP and subject examinations is 50. Credit will be 
evaluated by department chairmen. 

Affirmative Action 

The University of New Haven is committed to a policy which 
provides for equality of opportunity in employment, advancement, 



admissions and educational opportunity to all persons on the basis 
of individual merit. 

The Affirmative Action Plan of the university serves as the 
document through which federal, state and local laws pertaining to 
fair employment, admissions and educational programs are inter- 
preted and carried out. Copies of the Affirmative Action Plan are 
available from the office of the Director of Equal Opportunity. 

Crediting Examinations 

A student who has independent knowledge of the content of an 
undergraduate course offered by the university may, with the ap- 
proval of the respective department chairman and dean, take a 
special crediting examination in lieu of taking the course. 

Students are encouraged to take crediting examinations if they 
profess a proficiency in a subject area. Students are reminded that 
they must earn at least 30 semester hours through regular course 
work, if they are to meet the residency requirement for graduation. 

No student may take crediting examinations during the first 
and last semester in which he is enrolled. 

Double Majors 

A minor or an Associate degree may be taken in a department 
other than that of the student's major concurrent with the persual of 
the major program. A full double major may be taken by fulfilling 
all the core requirements for each major. This includes the core 
requirements of each division and each department involved. A 
double major shall not be construed to be a double degree. 

Pre- Professional Programs 

In addition to the traditional professions such as law, medicine, 
public service and the ministry, more and more vocations require 
that students continue their training after earning the bachelor 
degree. Students who wish to begin training for a profession at the 
graduate level should write to the university they expect to attend 
and ask for a statement of the entrance requirements. 

Prescribed programs in the student's major area will be mod- 
ified to meet requirements for entrance into professional programs 
or to meet the special needs of individual students. Such programs 
must be approved in writing by the appropriate department chair- 
man and dean. 



DIVISIONS OF THE 
UNIVERSITY 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

The University of New Haven has three administrative divi- 
sions: the undergraduate Schools of Arts and Sciences, Engineering 
and Business Administration; the Division of Continuing Educa- 
tion; and the Graduate School. Included in the Division of Continu- 
ing Education are the Evening College, Off Campus Programs, 
Summer School, the Division of Special Studies, and the Interses- 
sion Program. All divisions of the university are coeducational. 

The three undergraduate schools offer programs leading to a 
four-year baccalaureate degree and a two-year associate degree. 

Students pursuing a course of study leading to a Bachelor of 
Science degree in Business Administration may elect a major in 
accounting; business administration; communication; criminal jus- 
tice; economics; finance; hotel, restaurant, institutional manage- 
ment, tourism and travel; international business; management sci- 
ence, operations management (including computer concentration); 
marketing; personnel management or retailing, 
stitutional management; or retailing. 

Students in programs leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in 
Engineering may choose programs in civil, electrical, industrial, 
materials or mechanical engineering. A Bachelor of Computer 
Technology is also offered by the School of Engineering. 

Students in a course of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts 
degree can elect a major in art, biology, chemistry, economics, 
English, environmental studies, history, mathematics, world 
music, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, sociology 
or social welfare. Bachelor of Science degree programs are available 
in biology, chemistry, fire science, occupational safety and health or 
physics. A student may also pursue an interdisciplinary program 
leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree in either American studies or 
anthropology. 

Associate in Science degree programs are offered in aeronauti- 
cal technology, business administration, engineering, engineering 
science, hotel administration, correctional administration, law en- 
forcement administration, forensic science or retailing. 

Students pursuing a course of study leading to an Associate in 
Science degree in the arts and sciences may choose a major in 
biology, chemistry, general studies, commercial and advertising 
art, occupational safety and health or journalism. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Since its inception in the fall of 1969, the Graduate School has 
experienced remarkable growth. The key to this growth has been 
quality education leading to degrees which are keyed to job en- 
hancement and professional development. The Graduate School 
schedules its programs and courses to meet the needs of working 
professionals. In this regard, courses are offered in the early even- 
ing on the West Haven campus, as well as at off campus locations in 
Groton/New London, Danbury, Middlebury, Waterbury and 
Cromwell. 

-The Graduate School operates on a trimester calendar with 
three 13-week terms and short summer term. This provides 
scheduling flexibility for students who are employed and enables 
students to complete their studies within a reasonable length of 
time. The student body tends to be quite heterogeneous with respect 
to background, age and work experience, providing an additional 
dimension to the learning experience. Advanced undergraduate 
students may, with proper authorization, enroll in selected 
graduate courses. 

The university currently offers graduate programs leading to 
the degrees of Master of Business Administration, Master of En- 
gineering, Master of Public Administration and Master of Arts in 
community psychology or organizational-industrial psychology. 
Master of Science programs are offered in accounting, criminal 
justice, environmental engineering, environmental sciences, indus- 
trial engineering, electrical engineering, operations research, taxa- 
tion and computer and information science. 



DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 

This division of the university has six distinct programs. The 
largest is the Evening College which offers a wide variety of under- 
graduate credit programs. 

The others are: Summer School, which offers undergraduate 
courses in two five-week terms to students wishing to accelerate 
their academic careers or to make up courses uncompleted during 
the previous year; extension courses offered at various locations 
throughout the state; Intersession, which offers credit courses dur- 
ing the period between the fall and spring semesters; the Division of 
Special Studies, which offers a variety of non credit, certificate 
courses in both specialized and general areas of study; and the 



Management Center, which provides specialized training to mana- 
gers and administrators in business and industry. 



EVENING COLLEGE 

The University of New Haven recognizes that not every student 
can afford the time or expense of a full time education. The Evening 
College was established to serve those students seeking to widen 
their academic horizons while still pursing a career. The Evening 
College staff is dedicated to guiding students into programs that 
best suit their strengths and career needs. 

The university believes that work is a vital life experience, one 
which can be enhanced by academic study. To enrich this experi- 
ence, a student's work should, if possible, be closely related to his 
course of study. 

The Evening College offers programs leading to the Bachelor of 
Science, Bachelor of Arts or Associate in Science degrees. Most 
courses offered by the Evening College, except laboratory and cer- 
tain four-hour courses, meet from 7-9:45 p.m., one night a week. The 
university is open Monday through Saturday. 

A student may carry as few as two semester hours or as many as 
eleven. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

Undergraduate courses are offered during the summer by the 
university in two five-week terms. Both day and evening courses 
are offered. 

The university welcomes students from other institutions who 
wish to make up courses or earn advanced standing at their parent 
schools. Credits earned at the University of New Haven are gener- 
ally acceptable to other schools, but, for the protection of the stu- 
dent, a letter of authorization from the parent school is required 
before enrollment is permitted. 

University of New Haven students can attend Summer School 
to lighten their study load during the regular academic year, to 
reduce the time required for a degree, to prepare for other courses, to 
make up courses or to take additional work beyond that required for 
a degree and still complete a program on schedule. 

A list of the courses offered during the summer is available 
from the Division of Continuing Education each spring. 



DIVISION OF SPECIAL STUDIES 

This division offers a series of professional certificate courses in 
engineering, business and general areas. They are usually de- 
signed to provide supplemental knowledge and skills needed in 
specialized jobs in business and industry, and do not carry academic 
credit. Further information may be obtained by requesting separate 
schedules and course folders from the director of the Division of 
Special Studies. A certificate is granted upon successful course 
completion. 



INTERSESSION 

A number of undergraduate courses are offered during the 
break between the fall and spring semesters. These courses blend 
both traditional and innovative methods of instruction, including 
team teaching, field trips, lectures, laboratory work and research 
projects. A listing of courses offered during Intersession will be 
available from the Division of Continuing Education in November. 



OFF CAMPUS PROGRAMS 

The University of New Haven has sought to fill the educational 
demands of not only the New Haven area, but those of the region as 
well. It has done this with both undergraduate and graduate pro- 
grams in various off campus locations in the state. 

One of the most unusual programs is the University of New 
Haven at New London. It offers the only upper level degree pro- 
grams in business administration and engineering in the south- 
eastern Connecticut area. It also offers a four year degree prbgram 
in criminal justice. Taught by regular University of New Haven 
faculty, both day and evening courses are available. 

In addition, the Graduate School offers programs in Groton/ 
New London, Danbury, Middlebury, Waterbury and Cromwell. 



MANAGEMENT CENTER 

The purpose of the Management Center is to provide educa- 
tional opportunities for those managers and administrators in in- 
dustry, business, and service organizations whose needs are not met 

8 



in more conventional undergraduate or graduate programs. The 
overall objective of the center is to offer programs to help managers 
of maturity and experience meet the broader and more complex 
requirements of positions of greater responsibility in their orggmi- 
zations. 

Broadly speaking, the programs of the center are designed to 
meet the needs of two different levels of management: those of 1) 
staff and line executives at upper levels; and 2) middle management 
administrators. At the upper executive level the programs consist of 
seminars and workshops of varjdng lengths, as needed. At the 
middle management level the standard format is a part time on- 
campus program. Inplant programs are offered which meet the 
specific needs of an individual company or industry. Special pro- 
grams are available on an ad hoc basis, either on or off campus, as 
required. 



UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION 
DAY DIVISION 
Admission Requirements 

Each school of the university has its own admission require- 
ments which are defined in detail in subsequent pages of this 
catalog. 

Generally, graduates of accredited secondary schools are eligi- 
ble for admission. Applicants with weak high school credentials and 
applicants with GED equivalency diplomas may be admitted to the 
university through the Department of General Studies. Applicants 
who are temporarily assigned to the Department of General Studies 
will be full-time matriculated students. Department of General 
Studies students are required to take a series of four coordinated 
courses which are designed to strengthen their foundations in basic 
skills and to prepare them for the more demanding upper level 
courses. 

With the exception of auditors, students wishing to take any 
course, whether or not they seek a degree, must satisfy the admis- 
sion requirements. 

The University of New Haven welcomes the applications from 
men and women from all geographic areas, from public or private 
schools and fi-om all races, economic levels and religions. 



Admission Procedure 

1. Write or telephone the university for information or to arrange 
for an interview. Telephone (area code 203) 934-6321, ext. 211 or 
212. 

2. Secure an application form from the Admissions Office of the 
university or from your high school guidance counselor. 

3. Submit the completed application form with a $15 application 
fee. This fee is not refundable. 

4. Request your secondary school and/or college to forward an 
academic transcript to the Admissions Office. Work in progress 
may be submitted and students are encouraged to do so. Appli- 
cants who have academic work in progress at the time the initial 
transcripts are requested are responsible for submitting 
supplementary records as they become available. 

5. Submit College Board test scores (S.A.T.), or A.C.T., or arrange 
to take the University of New Haven tests. 



Registration 

There are two parts to registration: the completion of the regis- 
tration forms and the payment of tuition. There is a penalty fee for 
delaying either of these two processes beyond the end of the regist- 
ration period. 

Registration dates and procedures for currently enrolled day 
students will be posted in advance. Registration procedures will be 
mailed to new students. New students must register in person. A 
separate registration is required for each of the semesters and for 
the summer sessions. 

Social Security numbers will be used on student records; stu- 
dents should be sure to bring their numbers when registering. 
Prospective students who do not have Social Security numbers 
should apply for them before registration. Students from other 
countries who do not have Social Security numbers will be given a 
temporary number by the university; however, they will be encour- 
aged to apply for a Social Security number as soon as possible. 

Day students may register for no more than three evening 
courses. Any waiver of this regulation must be obtained from the 
appropriate dean. 

Students are urged to plan their programs carefully before 
completing the registration forms in order to avoid the need for 
requesting changes. Once the registration is completed, the student 

10 



is charged the Change of Registration Fee for each change he 
makes. The fee is payable when the student completes the form 
requesting the change. 

All students pay the tuition charged by the division in which 
they are matriculated. Courses taken outside the division of ma- 
triculation incur the tuition charge of the division of matriculation, 
irrespective of tuition differences between divisions. 



DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 
Admissions Requirements 

The University of New Haven welcomes applications from men 
and women from all geographic areas, public and private schools 
and all races, economic levels and religions. 

Generally, graduates of accredited secondary schools or per- 
sons who have a state high school diploma are eligible for admis- 
sion. 

Information regarding the examination for the state high 
school diploma may be obtained from the Director of Admissions or 
by writing to the Bureau of Youth Services, State Department of 
Education, State Office Building, Hartford, Connecticut 06103. 

In some cases, an adult who has completed at least two years of 
secondary school with a satisfactory record may be considered, 
provided he or she performs exceptionally well on the required 
placement examinations. In the case of adults, the university is 
interested in evidence of maturity and motivation as well as in 
formal education as prerequisites for admission. Such an admission 
will be tentative for one year, and during that time the student must 
pass the examinations for the state high school diploma. A person 
who has not completed at least two years of secondary school will not 
be considered. 

With the exception of auditors, students taking any course, 
whether for a degree or not, must meet admission requirements. 

Applicants from secondary schools are required to take admis- 
sion tests, including scholastic aptitude, mechanics of English, and 
reading comprehension. College Entrance Examination Board re- 
sults, if satisfactory , are accepted in place of the University of New 
Haven admission requirements. 

11 



Admission Procedure 

Persons seeking admission should call or write the Division of 
Continuing Education to arrange a personal interview. During the 
interview, the applicant will complete a personal data form and 
plan his program. Interviews may be scheduled during office hours 
at the convenience of the applicant. 

When the applicant decides to seek admission, an application 
fee must be paid. The university then requests the secondary school 
record of the applicant. Those applicants who have attended other 
colleges or universities must present transcripts from those institu- 
tions, whether applying for admission or applying for advanced 
standing. The student must arrange this individually, and by using 
a form which is available for this purpose. 



Registration 

All new students must register in person at the Office of Con- 
tinuing Education. Currently enrolled students may register by 
mail and forms will be mailed to each student prior to registration 
dates. A separate registration is required for each of the semesters 
and for summer sessions. 

There are two parts to registration: the completion of the regis- 
tration forms and the payment of tuition. There is a penalty fee for 
delaying either of these two processes beyond the end of the regis- 
tration period. 

Auditors follow the same procedure and pay the same fees as 
credit students. 

Students are urged to plan their programs carefully before 
completing registration forms to avoid the need for changes. Once 
the registration period has ended, a "change of registration" fee is 
charged for each change made, payable when the form requesting 
the change is completed. 



12 



SCHOLASTIC 
REGULATIONS 



Grading System 

The following grading system is in use and except where other- 
wise specified applies both to examinations and to term work. The 
weight of a final examination grade is a matter individually deter- 
mined by each instructor. 

A Superior 

B Good 

C Fair 

D Lowest passing grade 

F Failure or withdrawal after midpoint with unsatisfactory 

work 
Inc. Incomplete 

1. The grade of Incomplete indicates that some work remains 
to be completed to gain academic credit for a course. An 
Incomplete is assigned at the discretion of the instructor. 
This assignment shall not be automatic, but shall be based 
upon an evaluation of the student's work completed to date 
and an assessment of the student's ability to complete 
course requirements within the allowed time limit. 

2. Work to remove an Incomplete must be performed within 
twelve (12) months following the last day of the semester in 
which an incomplete is incurred. 

3. When such work is completed, the instructor will assign a 
final grade for the course. 

4. Should the student fail to complete unfulfilled academic 
assignments within twelve (12) months, the grade of W will 
be entered on the student's record. This grade will be final; 
no further opportunity to complete the course will be avail- 
able to a student after this time. 

W Withdrawal. Indicates either (1) withdrawal prior to the 
midpoint of semester or (2) withdrawal after the midpoint 
of semester and work satisfactory at that time. 

S Satisfactory. Given only in non-credit courses and in cer- 

tain courses of independent study. 

U Unsatisfactory. Given only in non-credit courses and in 
certain courses of independent study. 

13 



In all courses of independent study, including internships, case 
studies, reading programs, practica, theses and work-study experi- 
ences, the student and his advisor must jointly file a project outline 
with the Registrar within four weeks of the beginning of the course. 
This outline shall serve as the basis for determining satisfactory 
completion of course requirements. In the case of intensive or con- 
densed coursework, project outlines must be filed at least one week 
prior to the last day of the session. 

Full time students must complete a minimum of 12 credits per 
semester to retain their status as full time students. Completion is 
defined as receipt of a letter grade (A to F) as opposed to W or 
Incomplete. 

A student may not register for more than 15 semester hours in 
any one semester without written permission from his advisor and 
approval of his department chairman unless the student's work 
sheet specifically requires him to take more hours. In the latter case 
the student is limited to the number of hours specified on his work 
sheet. 

In most instances a student will be required to achieve a 
cumulative quality point ratio of 3.20 in order to register for more 
than 15 semester hours in any one semester. This policy applies to 
all students entering the University of New Haven after September 
1, 1976. 



Grade Reports 

Reports of the final grade in each subject will be mailed to the 
student soon after the close of each semester. The same report will 
be mailed to employers in those instances in which the student has 
given his approval. 



Repetition of Work 

A course in which a student has received a grade of F or above 
may be repeated only with the consent of the chairman of the 
department in which the course is listed. If a student achieves a 
higher grade in the second attempt, the cumulative average will 
reflect the achievement. However, the lower grade in the course 
remains a part of the student's permanent record. 

14 



Academic Standards 

The academic standing of each student will be determined on 
the basis of his quality point ratio each semester. 

In order to determine quality point ratios, each letter grade is 
assigned a quality point value: 

A 4 quality points 
B 3 quality points 
C 2 quality points 

D 1 quality point 

F quality points 

The quality point ratio for all students is obtained by multiply- 
ing the quality point value of each grade by the number of semester 
hours of the course, then dividing the total quality points by the 
total semester hours. 

Students are required to maintain a quality point ratio in 
accordance with the following scale: 

Quality point ratio of 1.50 for 3-30 semester hours attempted 
of 1.60 for 31-45 semester hours attempted 
of 1.70 for 46-60 semester hours attempted 
of 1.80 for 61-75 semester hours attempted 
of 1.90 for 76-90 semester hours attempted 
of 2.00 for 91 or more semester hours 
attempted 



Probation and Dismissal 

Failure to earn the required cumulative quality point ratio will 
place a student on academic probation for the following semester of 
enrollment. A student is automatically dismissed when he receives 
a third probation or when his quality point ratio for any one semes- 
ter is less than 1.00. 

First-semester freshmen earning a quality point ratio less than 
1.00 are automatically referred to the Academic Standing and Ad- 
missions Committee which may specify conditions for continued 
enrollment. A record of committee action shall appear on the stu- 
dent's permanent record. Committee decisions are normally viewed 
as final, and may be reversed only by the provost or president of the 
university. 

15 



Appeal of Dismissal 

Should a student wish to appeal academic dismissal, the stu- 
dent must contact his department chairman; or, if the chairman is 
unavailable, the student must contact his dean. The student must 
request, in writing, that the chairman or dean recommend recon- 
sideration of the dismissal. The student must also write the Director 
of Admissions and ask that the Academic Standing and Admissions 
Committee review the dismissal. The Academic Standing and Ad- 
missions Committee will review the appeal and make a decision. 
If the appeal is denied, the student is dismissed and is not billed 
for the semester during which he was dismissed. The student may 
reapply after one semester. 

Academic probation for transfer students is determined in ac- 
cordance with the same graduated scale as for non-transfer stu- 
dents. In determining a transfer student's academic standing, his 
total semester hours (those received at another college plus those at 
the University of New Haven) are applied to the graduated scale. 
However, only the cumulative average earned at the University of 
New Haven is considered in determining the student's academic 
standing. 



Readmission 

Application for readmission after a student has been dismissed 
normally will be considered only after the lapse of a semester and 
only when the student provides evidence which indicates his prob- 
able success if readmitted. 

Unusual circumstances may permit earlier application if the 
student's dean and department chairman successfully petition the 
Academic Standing and Admissions Committee to review the 
applicant's case. 

Requests for readmission should be submitted in writing to the 
Director of Admissions for transfer to the chairman of the Academic 
Standing and Admissions Committee at least three weeks before 
the opening of the semester and should include evidence supporting 
the student's belief that he will succeed if readmitted. 

Readmission is not automatic. The Academic Standing and 
Admissions Committee reviews each application and recommends 
rejection, acceptance, or conditional acceptance to the Director of 
Admissions. 

16 



Dean's List 

Full time students who earn a quality point ratio of 3.20 or 
better in any one semester will be placed on the Dean's List. 

All part time students who have accumulated a minimum of 14 
semester hours at the university will automatically be considered 
for the Dean's List at the end of each semester. A cumulative quality 
point ratio of 3.20 or better is required. 



Degrees 

The baccalaureate or associate degree will be conferred at 
commencement when the student has met all the requirements of 
his program and has met the following university requirements: 

1 . has submitted a paid Graduation Intent form to the Registrar; 

2. has earned a cumulative quality point ratio of at least 2.00; 

3. has been recommended by the faculty; 

4. has met all financial obligations; 

5. has met the residency requirement of the university. 



Honors 

Honors may be conferred upon candidates for graduation who 
have completed at least 60 semester hours of work at the University 
of New Haven. Application of transfer credit often carries over into 
the junior and senior years for four-year transfer students. The fol- 
lowing standards shall be used: 

1 . The bachelor degree Cum Laude may be awarded to a student 
whose cumulative quality point ratio is at least 3.25 at the end 
of the first semester of his senior year and who continues to 
attain the same standard for the remainder of the year. 

2. The bachelor degree Magna Cum Laude may be awarded to a 
student whose cumulative quality point ratio is at least 3.50 at 
the end of the first semester of his senior year and who con- 
tinues to attain the same standard for the remainder of the 
year, whose quality point ratio in all courses counting toward 
his major is at least 3.50, and who has completed all the 
suggested courses within his curriculum. 

3. The bachelor degree Summa Cum Laude may be awarded to 
a student whose cumulative quality point ratio is at least 3.70 

17 



at the end of the first semester of his senior year, who con- 
tinues to attain the same standard for the remainder of the 
year, whose quality point ratio in all courses counting toward 
his major is at least 3.70, and who has completed all the 
suggested courses within his curriculum. 
An associate degree With Honors is awarded to students who 
have a quality point ratio of 3.25 for the semester hours specifically 
required for the degree program from which they are being 
graduated, and who have taken 30 or more hours of required work at 
this university. 

An associate degree With High Honors is awarded to students 
who have a quality point ratio of 3.50 based on the same considera- 
tions as noted above. 

In determining eligibility for degrees with honor, credits 
earned by crediting examinations and electives in excess of those 
required will not be considered. 



Advanced Study 

Advanced study courses are offered for qualified students in the 
departments offering the degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor 
of Arts. These courses may include a thesis, tutorial work or inde- 
pendent study which permits the students to work intensively in 
areas of special interest. 



Classification of Students 

In order to be classified as a member of any class except the 
Freshmen class, a student must meet the credit hour requirement 
indicated as follows: 

Sophomore - 27 Hours 

Junior - 57 Hours 

Senior - 87 Hours 



Attendance Regulations 

Every student is expected to attend all regularly scheduled 
classes. This is a major responsibility of the student to himself and 
to the university. The primary penalty for non-attendance lies in 
the student's lessened grasp of the subject matter of the course. 

18 



From time to time, it may become necessary for the university to 
compile attendance records for every course in order to meet the 
needs of regulatory agencies and accrediting bodies. 

A maximum of two weeks of absences (that is, two absences per 
semester for an evening student, six absences per semester for a day 
student meeting a class three times a week, four if the class meets 
twice weekly) will be permitted for illnesses and emergencies. If the 
student is absent more than the maximum allowed, he will be 
dismissed from the class unless he obtains permission from the 
instructor to continue. Please refer to the Student Handbook for 
further clarification of attendance requirements if necessary. 



Transfer of Credit to the University 

Students may transfer to the university after completing 
academic work at other institutions. Application for admission 
should be made to the Director of Admissions. If feasible, a potential 
transfer student should visit the university and discuss his or her 
transfer credit situation with the chairman or dean administering 
the curriculum of interest. Transfer credit may be affected by the 
level of accreditation of the institutions previously attended. Nor- 
mally, the university accepts credit from regionally or nationally 
accredited colleges on an equivalency basis. 

The residency requirement of the university is 30 credit hours 
taken at West Haven or at one of the university's extension centers. 
This requirement applies to all degrees, undergraduate and 
graduate, and must be satisfied in the five years preceding gradua- 
tion. 

Students transferring from another institution must possess at 
least a 2.00 quality point ratio. Credit is granted only for those 
courses completed with a grade of "C" or its equivalent, or better. 
Credit transfer from a two-year institution is generally limited to 60 
credit hours, unless otherwise approved in writing by the dean of 
the school in which the student seeks to enroll. Final decisions on 
transfer credit are made by department chairmen and must conform 
to policies unique to the school. Specific programs may require that 
a potential student take qualifying or placement examinations in 
English, mathematics or computer programming. Plans of study for 
a University of New Haven degree should be agreed upon by both 
the transfer student and the department early in the first term of 
attendance in order to avoid course duplication and academic dis- 
continuity. To insure depth of study, the residency requirement 

19 



must include 12 credit hours of work in the declared major for an 
associate degree, and 18 credit hours for a bachelor's degree. Excep- 
tions may be granted only by the dean administering the major. 



Transfer of Credit from the University 

Credits may be transferred from the University of New Haven, 
a fully accredited university, to any other college or university 
merely by obtaining a letter of authorization from the school regu- 
larly attended. 



Courses Available at Other Colleges 

The University of New Haven has established policies to allow 
its students to take courses at Southern Connecticut State College, 
Albertus Magnus College and Quinnipiac College. University of 
New Haven students interested in taking courses at other colleges 
and universities in the New Haven area should discuss this matter 
directly with the deans of their schools and consult the statement of 
policy established by the schools of Arts and Sciences, Business 
Administration and Engineering. 

For students with particular needs and interests, certain de- 
partments at the university offer the opportunity for an interdisci- 
plinary major. The student may plan a program in two or more 
major departments. In such cases, the dean will appoint a faculty 
member from each department to plan with the student a sequence 
of courses which most nearly satisfies his interests. The program 
will generally consist of existing courses and independent study. A 
minimum of 51 credits in the area of interest must be completed to 
satisfy the requirements for graduation. The program must be ap- 
proved by the department chairman and forwarded to the Registrar 
to be filed in the student's folder. 



20 



TUITION, FEES, AND 
EXPENSES 



Day Division, regular academic year, 1976-77 
For students enrolled in the Day Division. 

Application Fee $15.00 

Payable once at the time of initial application. 

Acceptance Fee $50.00 

Payable by all new students (incoming freshmen, transfer, and 
former students) upon notification of acceptance, not refund- 
able. 



Tuition Per Semester Per Year 

Full time students, 12 to 18 

hours or equivalent $1161.00 $2322.00 

Less than 12 credit hours, day division, 

per credit hour $ 81.25 

More than 18 credit hours, or 

equivalent, per credit 

hour $ 54.00 

Student Activity Fee $ 35.00 $ 70.00 

Total standard tuition and fees for 

regular full time students for 

1976-77 academic year $1196.00 $2392.00 



Note: The Student Activity Fee is distributed by the Day Student 
Government and covers the cost of student supported ser- 
vices such as the newspaper and radio station and helps 
defray the expenses of clubs, organizations, social ac- 
tivities and the football and lacrosse teams. 



Registration Late Fee $ 15.00 

Assessed for failure to complete registration at the designated 
time. 

21 



Tuition Late Fee $ 5.00 

Assessed for failure to complete tuition payment by the due 
date: an additional fee for nonpayment of $5.00 at the start of 
the semester, plus $1.00 per day for each day thereafter, up to 
a maximum of $30.00. 



Evening College, regular academic year, 1976-77 
For students enrolled in the Evening College. 

Application Fee $ 10.00 

Payable once at the initial time of application. Not refundable. 



Tuition 

Part time students, up to 12 credit 

hours, per credit hour $ 54.00 

Note: The Evening College tuition includes the Student Activity 
Fee which covers subscription to the university news- 
paper, use of the Student Center, and helps to defray the 
cost of all student activities and facilities. 

Tuition Late Fee $ 5.00 

Assessed for failure to complete tuition payment by the start of 
the semester, plus $1.00 for each additional day thereafter, up 
to a maximum of $30.00. 



Change of Registration Fee $ 5.00 

Assessed for changing courses or sections after the completion 
of registration. 



Other Fees 

Applicable to all undergraduate students enrolled in the uni- 
versity. 

Laboratory fees 

Payable each semester by students registering for courses re- 
quiring the laboratory fee. See course descriptions for specific 
amounts. Not refundable. 

22 



Make-up examination 

Assessed when a student is permitted to take an end-of- 
semester examination at a time other than the scheduled time, 
except for conflicts caused by the examination schedule . . . .$5.00 

Make-up test 

Assessed when a student is permitted to make up an announced 
test during the semester $ 3.00 

Auditors 

The fee for a student auditor in any course or courses is the 
same as if the courses were taken for credit. 

Graduation fee 

Assessed regardless of participation in exercises; no reduction 
will be made for non-attendance. For graduation in June, the fee 
and graduation petition are due no later than March 1 of the year of 
graduation; for January commencement, the fee and graduation 
petition are due before October 15 of the prior calendar year. Failure 
to meet the deadline date will result in a charge of $25.00 above the 
normal graduation fee. This fee will be paid if there is sufficient 
time to process the graduation petition. If processing is not possible, 
graduation will be postponed to the next award date $35.00 

Transcript of academic work 

No charge for the first copy; thereafter, per copy $1.00 

All students pay the tuition charged by the division in which 
they are matriculated. Courses taken outside the division of ma- 
triculation incur the tuition charge of the division of matriculation, 
irrespective of tuition differences between divisions. For example, a 
student matriculated in the Evening College but taking a daytime 
course would pay the cost of tuition for that course at the per credit 
cost charged in the Evening College, not the daytime cost. 



Residence Charges 

Dormitory rooms are contracted for the entire academic year 
excluding Intersession courses. The Residence will officially be 
closed during Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Spring vacation 
periods when classes are not in session. 

A dormitory deposit is required of all students who will be 
living in the Residence, and this deposit will be deducted from the 
spring semester room charge. The room deposit is not refundable 
after July 31 of the year to which it pertains. 

23 



Living Expenses 

The university assumes no responsibility for loss or destruction 
of any clothing or personal belongings of the student. An optional 
linen plan is available for those students who desire it. 

Room Deposit $100.00 

Room Charge per Year $830.00 

Damage Deposit, refundable $ 50.00 

20 Meal Plan (Monday through Saturday, 

3 meals per day, Sunday brunch and dinner) 

per year $705.00 

15 Meal Plan (Monday through Friday, 

3 meals per day) per year $650.00 



Payments 

Tuition, fees and other charges are payable when due. Checks 
or money orders should be made payable to University of New 
Haven. 

As a convenience to those who desire to spread their payments 
out over a period of time, a deferred education payment plan is 
available to full time students and to part time students carrying six 
or more credits or the equivalent. Details of this plan are available 
at the Business Office. 

The university withholds the giving of grades, the issuance of 
transcripts and the granting of honorable dismissal to any student 
whose account is in arrears. 



Withdrawal 

From University 

Students are required to discuss their intentions with a 
member of the Counseling Center before officially withdrawing 
from the university. Forms for withdrawal are available at the 
Counseling Center. 

From a Program 

Students considering a change in program should first discuss 
the matter with the department chairman of the proposed new 
program. If it is agreed that the change is advisable, written per- 

24 



mission will be granted. Forms for making a change are provided by 
the Reception Office. 

Course changes 

Forms are available at the Student Records Office. 

Registration does not carry with it the right of an automatic 
refund of tuition in cases of withdrawal. No deduction is made for 
temporary absence from classes, nor is any refund made if a student 
is suspended or dismissed. 



Refund of Tuition 

1 . Any student under the age of 18 must have the written consent of 
a parent or guardian to withdraw from the university with an 
indication to whom any refund, if applicable; is to be paid. 

2. Tuition is refunded or canceled according to the scale below upon 
receipt of formal withdrawal request before the end of the fourth 
week of a semester. 

1st Week — 80% 
2nd Week — 60% 
3rd Week — 40% 
4th Week — 20% 
After 4th Week — 0% 

A prorated credit toward the following semester or refund may 
be awarded, subject to the decision of the Committee on Withdraw- 
als, in situations involving: 

(a) death or protracted illness of a student; 

(b) involuntary induction into military service; 

(c) other clearly extenuating circumstances; 

(d) in the case of part time students, transfer or change of 
work initiated by employer that precludes meeting class 
schedules. 

All requests for refund must be made in writing and include 
necessary documentation. The university assumes no responsibility 
beyond the foregoing for withdrawal occasioned by the pressures of 
family life or occupation. 

Summer School Students 

In cases of withdrawal from a course or courses within the first 
week of each term, a refund of 50% of tuition is made. There is no 
refund of summer tuition after the first week. 

25 



The foregoing policy is intended to protect the university, since 
the university plans its expenses and bases its budget upon full 
collection of tuition and fees from all registered students, and as- 
sumes the obligation of supplying instruction and other services 
throughout the year. 



Changes in Arrangements 

The Board of Governors of the University of New Haven re- 
serves the right to make those changes in tuition, fees, and other 
costs which, in its judgment, are considered necessary and just. No 
changes in charges will be made retroactive. 



FINANCIAL AID 

More than one-half of the students at the university receive 
financial assistance annually in the form of scholarships, grants, 
loans, bursary work and the College Work-Study Program. Applica- 
tions should be made by returning students no later than April 1 for 
the following year and by new students before June 1. 

Uusually financial aid is not available for the summer term or 
at mid-year. Ordinarily students needing assistance will seek 
employment during the summer to help defray their expenses for 
the following year. 

Full information and applications for financial aid may be 
obtained from the Director of Financial Aid. 



Scholarships & Awards 

Academic Scholarships A number of scholarships are awarded 
each year on the basis of academic achievement, financial need, 
evidence of self-help and overall contribution to the university. To 
be eligible a student must have a cumulative Quality Point Ratio of 
3.2 or better and must show evidence of financial need. 

Donor Scholarships Many scholarship awards are available each 
year through the generosity of business firms, organizations and 
friends of the university. 

26 



Amity Charitable Trust Fund An annual award is made from the 
income of this fund to worthy students, based on ability, promise 
and financial need without regard to sex, race, country of national 
origin or religion. Preference is given to students whose homes are 
in the Greater New Haven area. 

Asarco-Enthone Scholarship An award of $1,000 is given annu- 
ally to a student in the field of chemistry. The recipient must be a 
citizen of the United States or Canada and be in good health. 
Selection is based on activities as well as scholarship. 

Clarence W. Dunham Scholarship An annual award of $500 is 
made to a civil engineering student after completion of his freshman 
year. Applicants must be recommended by the Dean of Engineering 
and the Chairman of Civil Engineering. 

Chesebrough-Ponds Engineering Scholarship This scholar- 
ship is designated for a minority student in the field of engineering. 
Preference is given to U.S. citizens. High academic ability and 
promise are prime considerations. 

Connecticut Hotel-Motel Association The association offers 
scholarship aid to Connecticut students majoring in the Depart- 
ment of Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional Management, Tourism 
and Travel. 

Faculty Wives Club Scholarship This award is given to a student 
demonstrating outstanding academic achievement as well as need 
for assistance. 

Food Service Executives Association The Connecticut Branch 
of F.S.E.A. provides scholarship aid for needy students in the De- 
partment of Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional Management, 
Tourism and Travel. 

H. B. Ives Company Scholarship Foundation An annual award 
of $500 is made to a male undergraduate seeking a degree in en- 
gineering, business administration or management. The recipient 
must be a resident of New Haven County. 

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Scholarship Fund An- 
nual awards are available to students entering the University of 
New Haven who exemplify the ideals of the late Dr. Martin Luther 
King, Jr. A gift from the Guilford Human Relations Council pro- 
vides additional awards to New Haven area black students. 

National Institute for the Food Service Industry The Golden 
Plate Scholarship Award is available to an outstanding student in 

27 



the Department of Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional Management, 
Tourism and Travel based on need and ability. 

New England Hotel-Motel and Restaurant Educational 
Foundation The foundation presents annual scholarships to de- 
serving students in this field. 

New Haven Water Company An annual scholarship is awarded 
to a student from the inner city of New Haven. Selection is made on 
the basis of financial need and potential for academic success in a 
college program. 

Southern Connecticut Gas Company Scholarship A scholar- 
ship of one-half year's tuition is sponsored by the Southern Connec- 
ticut Gas Company. This award is made annually to an inner city 
resident of New Haven meeting need and academic qualifications. 

Statler Foundation The foundation makes annual awards to de- 
serving students of the Department of Hotel, Restaurant, Institu- 
tional Management, Tourism and Travel. 

The New Haven Chapter of the American Society of Tool 
Engineers Annual scholarships to students in mechanical en- 
gineering are provided. 

The Olin Employees Fund Full tuition scholarships are offered to 
sons and daughters of Olin employees meeting the standards of 
selection. 

Virginia M. Parker Scholarship Established by Chi Kappa Rho 
Sorority, it is awarded annually to a freshman woman selected on 
the basis of scholarship, potential, and financial need. 

Wallace Silversmiths Division of HMW Industries A $1,500 
annual scholarship award is available to a financially disadvan- 
taged minority student majoring in business administration. 

Women's Seamen's Friend Society of Connecticut Assistance is 

offered to sons and daughters of merchant seamen of Connecticut 
and to students preparing for careers in the maritime industry. 

Yale University The scholarship plan for children of faculty and 
staff members of Yale University provides scholarship grants to 
qualified students. 

Other scholarships of a restricted nature are available. 
Annual prizes include the Freshman English Prize and the 
Nordlund Cup, which is awarded to an outstanding business major. 

28 



Grants 

The university awards a limited number of grants to students 
who have demonstrated academic promise and financial need, while 
at the same time contributing substantially to some area of univer- 
sity activity. 

Special consideration is given to Connecticut residents with 
financial need through funds made available to the university by 
the State of Connecticut. 

The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program is designed 
to assist needy students entering post-secondary education. Appli- 
cations and information usually are available through high school 
guidance offices and the student makes direct application to the 
program offices. 

All applicants for financial aid are required to apply for this 
grant as a part of aid application. 

Students with extreme needs may qualify for grants of from 
$200 to $1,000 annually under the Supplemental Educational Op- 
portunity Grants Program of the federal government. These 
grants, matched by other university assistance, are designed to 
make possible higher education for capable applicants who would 
otherwise be unable to attend. 

Many states and organizations offer scholarships and grants for 
which university students may be eligible. It is suggested that 
entering students become aware of any such opportunities for assis- 
tance. 



Loans 

National Direct Student Loans This program was established by 
the Higher Education Amendments of 1972 replacing the former 
National Defense Student Loan Program. Funds are available for 
loans of up to $1,000 annually to needy students with satisfactory 
academic records. Loans are repayable starting nine months after 
graduation at three percent simple interest. 

United Student Aid Fund This private, non-profit service corpo- 
ration provides long term, low interest loans to upperclassmen in 
good standing. Guaranty funds were provided by a donation of the 
Day Student Government so that the university could participate. 

29 



Guaranteed Loan Programs The State of Connecticut and many 
other states have established Higher Education Loan Programs 
offering long term loans at low interest rates. In Connecticut, a 
student may borrow up to a maximum of $1,500 each school year, 
repayable starting one year after graduation. Federal interest bene- 
fits may cover full interest while in attendance, if need criteria is 
met. 

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers The Connec- 
ticut Section of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers 
Student Loan Fund offers non-interest-bearing loans to senior stu- 
dents in electrical engineering. 

Additional Loans Loan assistance to students in temporary finan- 
cial difficulty is available through the Roy M. Jenkins, Jr., Memo- 
rial Fund and The C. L. Robertson Emergency Loan Fund. Both of 
these are administered by the Financial Aid Office. 



Law Enforcement Assistance Programs 



Loans 

The Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 estab- 
lished the Law Enforcement Student Loan Program which makes 
available ten-year, interest-bearing (7%) notes of up to $2,200 per 
academic year to full time students enrolled in undergraduate and 
graduate programs leading to degrees in areas directly related to 
law enforcement. These loans can be canceled at the rate of 25% for 
each year of employment in a public state, local, or federal law 
enforcement agency. Awards of these loans are subject to current 
restrictions of Department of Justice (LEAA) priority guidelines. 



Grants 

Grants are available to full time employees of a publicly funded 
law enforcement agency under the Law Enforcement Student Grant 
Program. Payments up to $400 per semester are provided to full 
time and part time students working toward degrees in this field. A 
recipient must agree to remain with a law enforcement agency for 
two years after completion of studies funded by this grant. 

30 



student Employment 

College Work-Study Program 

This federal assistance program is designed to enable students 
having financial need to work both during the summer and through 
the school year, thus earning a substantial portion of their college 
expenses. Work assignments are made on campus and also with 
public and private non-profit agencies such as the YMCA, YWCA, 
Benhaven, New Haven Boys' Club, Urban League of Greater New 
Haven and the Veterans Administration Hospital in West Haven. 

Bursary Work 

The university provides many jobs on campus for deserving 
students who may benefit from this type of employment. Awards are 
made each semester of approximately $450 for working an average 
of 12 hours a week. 



31 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND 
FACILITIES 

JOHN W. GHOREYEB 

Dean of Students 

CAROLE AIKEN 

Director of Affirmative Action 

DAVID DuBUISSON 

Director of Financial Aid 
Foreign Students Advisor 

P5:TER a. ROGERS 

Director of Minority Student Affairs 

CHRISTIAN F. POULSON 

Director of Career Development 

PHIUP S. ROBERTSON 

Director of Housing and Health 

GEORGE A. SCHAEFER 

Coordinator of Veterans Affairs 

MICHAEL W. YORK 

Director of Counseling 

SAMUEL M. BAKER, JR. 

University Librarian 

JOSEPH A. MACHNIK 

Director of Athletics 

LAWRENCE C. PARKER 

Director of Development 
and Alumni Relations 

Alumni Association 

Membership in the Alumni Association is acquired im- 
mediately upon graduation. All degree graduates of the University 
as well as diploma graduates of the School of Executive Develop- 
ment and the Management Center become members automatically. 
Including the class of 1976, there are over 7,500 members of the 
Alumni Association. A member of the administrative staff of the 
University serves as Director of Alumni Relations. An Executive 
Committee conducts the affairs of the Association during the period 
between meetings and also serves as a planning group. There is an 
alumni fund chairman for annual giving. 

32 



In addition to the bi-annual meeting, other meetings of social 
and educational interest occur during the year, and a quarterly 
publication, the Alumni News, is mailed without charge to each 
alumnus. Alumni Homecoming is an annual event occurring in 
October of each year. 

The Alumni Association is represented on the Board of Gover- 
nors by the member who is elected to the Board for a term of two 
years. The president of the Association serves on the Board of 
Governors as an ex-officio member. 

Membership on the Alumni Advisory Council is by invitation. 
In addition to the officers of the Alumni Association, twenty or more 
additional graduates of the University constitute the group. The 
Council is an advisory board to the University in the conduct of 
alumni affairs. Its primary objectives are to strengthen alumni 
relations, advise on matters of top-level policy involving the alum- 
ni, improve alumni communications, and assist in planning and 
conducting alumni events. The Council meets quarterly at the Uni- 
versity with the President of the University and the Director of 
Alumni Relations. 



Testing 

The Counseling Center of the University of New Haven offers 
psychological testing including vocational interest, personality as- 
sessment and academic placement. Students who are unsure of 
their academic skills, eventual career choices or life goals may 
request help in these areas. 

As a service to first semester seniors and members of the com- 
munity who are planning to apply to graduate schools, a Controlled 
Testing Center is maintained on campus. Arrangements may be 
made with the center for administration of the Miller Analogies 
Test and the forwarding of the score to the graduate school of the 
applicant's choice. All students wishing to take the Miller 
Analogies Test should contact the Counseling Center. 

Veterans Affairs 

Since the university has one of the largest veteran enrollments 
in Connecticut, an Office of Veterans Affairs with a full time staff is 
maintained. The Veterans Administration has assigned to the uni- 
versity a full time V.A. representative who maintains liaison di- 
rectly with state and national V.A. offices. In addition to processing 
applications for various V.A. benefits, the campus Veterans Office 

33 



provides a wide range of supportive services for veterans attending 
the university. Assistance is available in academic areas and spe- 
cial help such as tutorial assistance, readers for the blind and aid for 
the disabled is available. An active Veterans Club on campus pro- 
vides information about veterans' programs and activities. 



Women's Affairs 

The office of the Director of Women's Affairs is located in the 
Main Building. Activities of special interest to women are coordi- 
nated through the director, who meets regularly with women stu- 
dents. Personal counseling is available at any time. 

Women's studies programs are developed by a group of faculty, 
staff and students dedicated to the promotion of women's issues at 
the university. 



Career Development 

This office has two primary functions within the university: 
career counseling and placement. The staff works closely with the 
Counseling Center to help determine an appropriate career path for 
individual students. To assist students in a career choice, individual 
counseling, a career library and career seminars are available. In 
addition, a program of on-campus recruiting visits by employers is 
arranged each year for the benefit of University of New Haven 
students, both undergraduate and graduate. 

While the Career Development Office is not an employment 
service, listings of full time and part time openings are maintained 
to provide a common meeting ground for employers and prospective 
employees. 

Students seeking employment should visit the office personally 
as early as possible to discuss their plans. Alumni seeking positions 
are invited to use the services of the office. 

Employers wishing to list positions with the Career Develop- 
ment Office need only call the office or write, giving a description of 
the position available and other details. There is never any fee 
charged for listing a position. 

34 



Counseling 

Individual counseling is offered students for personal problems, 
for marital and domestic problems and for study and career choice 
problems. Students can obtain assistance for educational, voca- 
tional and general life problems. 

A student who does not know where to go for help should 
contact the Counseling Center for information and direction. 



Housing and Meal Plans 

On-Campus Housing 

The Residence is of modern design, containing 16 separate 
suites. Each suite consists of six double bedrooms opening out to a 
large living room. Each bedroom contains individual beds, desks, 
chest, and closets. Laundry facilities, snack bar and common 
lounge are also available in the dormitory. The Residence is coedu- 
cational; men are assigned to nine suites and women are assigned to 
seven suites. 

Applications will be filled in the order received. To be consid- 
ered, each application for residence must be accompanied by a 
$100.00 room reservation deposit. The total deposit is refundable if 
there is no available space. The dormitory contract is for the com- 
plete undergraduate school year (fall and spring semesters). The 
$100.00 reservation deposit will then become a security deposit and 
will be deducted from the second semester's room charge. 

The University Residence is closed during the Thanksgiving, 
Christmas and Spring recesses. 



Meal Plans 

Two meal plans are available to all students of the university. 
The 15-meal plan gives the student three meals per day from Mon- 
day through Friday. The 20-meal plan offers the student three 
meals per day Monday through Saturday and two meals on Sunday. 
The meal plans offer complete, well-balanced meals for a sizeable 
saving as compared to buying meals for cash. 

All dormitory students are required to have a meal plan and it 
is suggested that all off-campus residents within walking distance 
of the university participate in one of the two meal plans. 

35 



Off-Campus Housing 

Because there is a limited number of off-campus apartments 
and rooms in the immediate area, the university is unable to 
guarantee off-campus accommodations of your choice. 

The University Housing Office will have listings of all univer- 
sity approved housing in the general area. These listings will be 
available in the Housing Office during the latter half of July. 

In entering into an arrangement for private housing, the finan- 
cial terms should be discussed and implemented by the student 
himself. The university is, of course, not responsible for these ar- 
rangements, but will make every effort to see that the student is 
treated fairly. 



Health Services and Insurance 

Physical Examination 

Students are requested to provide a report of a recent physical 
examination to the Health Service upon acceptance so that the 
Health Service will have available past medical history, in case of 
an emergency. Appropriate forms for this purpose are provided. 

Infirmary 

The Infirmary, located in the Residence, is available for 
emergency first aid treatment and examination for all students, 
without charge. Day beds are provided for rest and care of mild 
illnesses for students living in university approved housing. The 
University Health Staff, under the direction of the Director of Hous- 
ing and Student Center, includes an internist, nurses and a 
psychologist. 

Accident and Health Insurance 

The University of New Haven Student Insurance Plan is 
another important service to full time students and their families. It 
was conceived and planned by the Student Government and is 
designed to help full time students of the university meet unex- 
pected and, very often, costly medical bills arising from an accident, 
and hospital and medical expenses required by sickness. 

The plan provides protection while the student is at home, at 
school or on vacation, 24 hours a day for a full twelve months. 
Benefits are payable in addition to those the student may receive 

36 



from any other policy. Details of the plan are available in a folder 
sent to all full time students and from the university nurse. 



Student Activities 



Student Councils 

Separate day and evening student councils have the responsi- 
bility for initiating, organizing and carrying through extracurricu- 
lar activities and for performing liaison functions between students 
and the university staff. 

Clubs and Organizations 

There are almost 40 university student clubs and societies open 
to interested students. Included are student chapters of professional 
societies, religious organizations, social groups and special interest 
clubs. 

Cultural Activities 

There are student organizations formed around interests in 
literature, art, films and drama. These groups sponsor visiting 
artists and lecturers, publish materials and generally provide a 
well-rounded cultural program for University of New Haven stu- 
dents. 



Fraternities and Sororities 

Many national and local service, social and honorary frater- 
nities and sororities are active on campus. They sponsor programs 
such as the semi-annual Bloodmobile and other services, as well as 
social functions. 



Publications 

Student publications include The News, the university stu- 
dent newspaper; The Chariot, the annual yearbook; the Noiseless 
Spider, a literary publication; and the Student Handbook. Any 
student may volunteer his services on any of the student publica- 
tions. 

37 



Radio Station 

WNHU, the university's student operated FM broadcast facil- 
ity, operates year-round on a frequence of 88.7 MHz at a power of 
1,700 watts. This extracurricular activity, open to all university 
students, serves southern Connecticut with the best in music, news 
and community affairs programming. Its sportscasters are the voice 
of University of New Haven Charger sports teams. The WNHU 
broadcast day consists mostly of locally produced shows. However, 
selected Intercollegiate Broadcasting System and National Public 
Radio features are also presented. 

In its first year, WNHU gained national attention when disk 
jockey Tony Salzo set a 270-hour world record for longest continuous 
broadcast. In 1974, WNHU again achieved national prominence by 
winning Broadcast Management/Engineering magazine's "Best 
Station Award". 

All WNHU activities in programming, business and engineer- 
ing operations are performed by students in the university's day, 
evening and graduate divisions. The station will train all qualified 
students in their respective areas of interest. 

Social Activitres 

The social calendar is filled with varied events to appeal to all 
students: mixers, concerts, films, free parties to climax each semes- 
ter, cabarets and Homecoming. 

The Student Center 

The Student Center provides a focal point for all student activi- 
ties. Offering lounges, student offices, a game room, a large cafe- 
teria and a snack bar, the facility has been designed to serve as a 
center for the student's non-academic college interests. 

The Rathskellar, also located in the Student Center, opens 
daily, serving draft beer and snacks. 



Computer Center 

The Computer Center offers time sharing and batch processing 
giving the student the opportunity to learn such computer lan- 
guages as FORTRAN, COBOL, PL/1, APL, RPG, Assembler, and 
simulation programs and a variety of engineering statistical pack- 
ages that are a part of many course offerings. A degree in computer 
science is now offered. The highly sophisticated equipment avail- 
able makes it possible for the university's training to meet the 
complex needs of business and industry. 

38 



The Computer Center is staffed by degreed computer profes- 
sionals and uses student operators whose interests He in the compu- 
ter field. 

Over 85 percent of computer time is given to academic service 
which provides active training to more than 700 students each 
semester. 

Library 

The Marvin K. Peterson Library, named for the President 
Emeritus of the university, was opened in 1974. It has a capacity of 
300,000 bound volumes. Adjoining the Main Building, it includes a 
rare book room, a special collection room, a music room, archives 
and spacious reading and reference areas. Study is made convenient 
by modern research facilities and equipment including micro- 
reading stations and microform and reader-printers. 

The library contains more than 85,000 volumes, 35,000 U.S. 
government periodicals and documents, over 2,500 record albums, 
numerous corporate annual reports, pamphlet files and microfilms. 
The library subscribes to nearly 1,000 periodicals and extensive 
back issue files are maintained. 

The resources of both the New Haven and West Haven public 
libraries are available to students (nonresidents must pay a fee). 
Under a reciprocal arrangement. University of New Haven stu- 
dents may borrow material from the libraries of Albertus Magnus 
College or Quinnipiac College by presenting a valid identity card. 



Bookstore 

The university's bookstore provides all necessary texts, new 
and used, that are required for courses at the university. It also 
carries room accessories (drapes, rugs, bedspreads, lamps, bulletin 
boards, wastepaper baskets), gifts, and a selection of paperbacks, 
periodicals and candies. The bookstore buys back used texts at the 
end of each semester. It also orders class rings and offers film 
processing to the campus population. 



Student Services 

Recognizing the importance of non-academic activities in the 
development of a student, the university offers a diverse program of 

39 



services and activities that make assistance available when needed 
and provide outlets for maturing student interests. 



Foreign Students 

The university is fortunate in having many countries rep- 
resented in its student body. The Foreign Student Office provides 
special guidance when needed. The International Students Club at 
the university sponsors many activities and trips. In addition, the 
International Student Center of New Haven welcomes all foreign 
students to the many programs they sponsor and to full use of their 
facilities. 



Minority Student Affairs 

The Director of Minority Students Affairs acts as a liaison 
between the administration and the minority students on campus. 
The director works closely with the Dean of Students and the Presi- 
dent of the University in making decisions that affect the welfare of 
minority students. 

The Office of Minority Student Affairs is in room 210b in the 
main building. 



Department of Athletics 

Athletic Director: Associate Professor Joseph A. Machnik, Ph. D., 

University of Utah. 
Chairman, Physical Education: Assistant Professor Donald 

Wynschenk, M.S., Southern Connecticut State College. 
Coordinator of Women's Athletics: Instructor Deborah Chin, 

M.S.P.E., University of North Carolina. 
Coaching Staff 

Baseball: Head Coach, Florindo Vieira, Assistant Professor, 

M.S., Southern Connecticut State College; Assistant Coach, 

Joseph Tonelli, M.S., University of North Carolina. 

Basketball: Head Coach, William R. Farrow, Instructor, M.S., 

Southern Connecticut State College. 

Cross Country, Club Track: Head Coach, Robert Deobil, B.S., 

Southern Connecticut State College. 

40 



Football: Head Coach, Thomas Bell, M.A., University of Con- 
necticut; Assistant Coach, Arcadio Rodriguez. 
Golf: Head Coach, Al Nicholson, B.S., University of New Haven. 
Hockey: Head Coach, Stephen Lane, B.A., University of Ver- 
mont; Assistant Coach, Arthur Crouse, B.S., Arnold College. 
Lacrosse: Head Coach WilHam Verhoeff, M.A.T., Brown; As- 
sistant Coach, Thomas DeFilippo, B.S., University of New Haven. 
Soccer: Head Coach, Joseph Machnik; Assistant Coach, John 
Kowalski, B.S., University of New Haven. 
Tennis: Head Coach, Donald Wynschenk. 



Athletics 

Recognizing the importance of a broad range of physical and 
emotional outlets to a well balanced college experience, the Univer- 
sity of New Haven seeks to involve the student on various levels of 
active participation in games and sports, as well as provide an 
opportunity for student and community support for its varsity in- 
tercollegiate sports program. 

During the fall, varsity football, soccer, cross country, golf, 
baseball and women's tennis are sponsored. The winter months 
find varsity hockey and basketball for the men, as well as basketball 
and volleyball for women. Baseball, tennis, lacrosse, golf, club 
track and women's softball are offered in the spring. 

The university is a member of the Eastern Collegiate Athletic 
Association and the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Its 
teams have participated in many regional and national post-season 
tournaments. The 1975 baseball squad posted a 27-7 record and won 
the New England ECAC Regional Baseball Tournament. 

The coaching staff welcomes your interest and participation 
and invites aspiring candidates to contact them at the North Cam- 
pus facility. 

The Intramural Program, administered by Physical Education 
Department Chairman Donald Wynschenk, sponsors tournaments 
and competition for interested players in touch football, badminton, 
bowling, three and five men basketball, foul shooting, paddleball, 
handball, softball, tennis, floor hockey and volleyball. Check the 
North Campus bulletin boards for the dates and times of intramural 
contests. 

The North Campus facility consists of six tennis courts, two 
softball fields, one baseball diamond, a multi-purpose football- 
soccer-lacrosse field, a weight-training room, a steam room, two full 

41 



size basketball courts, a gymnastics area and locker and shower 
areas for students and faculty. 

Courses in golf, sailing, badminton, bowling, tennis, karate, 
lifesaving, volleyball, racket ball, handball, dance and gymnastics 
are scheduled each semester. 

A valid university ID card is required for entrance to the North 
Campus gym or tennis courts during non-class or free play hours. 
The gymnasium will be open for free play at times when regularly 
scheduled games and classes are not in progress. Students should 
take care to secure their lockers or leave properly identified valu- 
ables with the equipment manager while using any facility. 

While members of the university's athletic teams are covered 
under an appropriate insurance policy, students who participate in 
intramurals and free play are not covered by such a policy and 
participate at their own risk. The university recommends that stu- 
dents who plan to use any North Campus facility for physical activ- 
ity carry an appropriate insurance policy to cover medical costs in 
case of an injury. 

Students with interests in activities not currently offered by 
either the Athletic or Physical Education departments are en- 
couraged to discuss these interests with department personnel. If 
sufficient interest is generated, these activities may be offered as 
part of the regular curriculum. 



42 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 

Douglas Robillard, Ph.D., Dean 

Bachelor of Arts 
degree programs in 

American Studies 

Art 

Biology 

Communication 

Chemistry 

Economics 

English 

Environmental Studies 

History 

Mathematics 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Social Welfare 

Sociology 

World Music 

Bachelor of Science 
degree programs in 

Biology 
Chemistry 



43 



Occupational Safety 
Physics 

Associate in Science 
degree programs in 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Commercial and Advertising Art 

General Studies 

Journalism 

Occupational Safety 



School of Arts and Sciences 

The ideals of a liberal education are intellectual and imagina- 
tive growth, freedom of thought and inquiry and a sense of personal 
worth. The active pursuit of wisdom, the enrichment of the spirit 
and the development of each individual as a person offer the world 
its best hope for the future. 

It is the aim of the School of Arts and Sciences to offer students 
the opportunity for a liberal education that will enrich the mind 
while it prepares them to pursue their interests and goals. Courses 
and programs have been designed to appeal to a wide range of 
interests and to secure the commitment of each student who is 
seriously engaged in the acquirement of an education. 

Education is made up of a great many things, and not all 
education takes place in the classroom or even on the campus. New 
Haven is an exciting cultural center that offers libraries, natural 
history museums, art museums and exhibitions and workshops for 
dance and the creative arts. A constant procession of speakers and 
performing artists come to the New Haven area. The Shubert Thea- 
ter presents pre-Broadway showings of new plays and road company 
performances of hit shows. Long Wharf Theater is an excellent 
regional company offering a varied fare of classics and new plays, 
and the Yale Repertory Theater is innovative and exciting. Pro- 
grams of old and new films are offered on several college campuses 
in the area. 

Speakers and performing artists are brought to the campus of 
the University of New Haven by the Arts and Sciences Forum. Each 
year a series of concerts is organized by the World Music Depart- 
ment. An annual arts festival allows artists to exhibit their work. 
The university's new library offers comfortable surroundings for 

44 



study and leisure reading. It has an excellent collection of books, 
journals, magazines and phonograph records. 

In the School of Arts and Sciences, the student is encouraged to 
pursue as broad-based a program of study as he wishes. The school 
offers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and 
Associate in Science. 

Associate Degree Program 

The associate degree program is designed to encourage the 
student to begin his college education even if he does not yet want to 
commit himself to a full four-year course of study. By taking 60 or 
more credits, the student may earn the degree of Associate in Sci- 
ence in such fields as biology, chemistry, commercial and advertis- 
ing art, general studies, journalism or occupational safety. 

The student wishing to pursue this option is encouraged to 
consult with the dean of the school or with the chairman in whose 
departments the associate degree program is offered. Students who 
complete the associate degree work may wish to have their credits 
applied toward further study leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts or Bachelor of Science. 



Bachelor degree programs 

Concentrated study within a specific discipline leads to the 
award of the B. A. and B.S. degrees. Students pursuing these degrees 
may concentrate their major studies in such fields as American 
studies, art, biology, chemistry, economics, English, environmental 
studies, fire science, history, mathematics, occupational safety, 
philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, social welfare, 
sociology or world music. A system of advisement allows the student 
to consult with members of the department in which he seeks his 
major, and students are encouraged to seek advisement on all as- 
pects of the programs they are studying. 

Minors 

It is highly recommended that students working toward a de- 
gree in one area of study give serious thought to organizing their 
elective courses so as to receive a minor in a second discipline. A 
minor usually consists of 18 credit hours devoted to the study of 
either a group of related subjects or subjects offered by one depart- 

45 



merit. Minors are offered in aeronautical technology, anthropology, 
art, biology, black studies, chemistry, communication, English, fire 
science, history, journalism, mathematics, occupational safety, 
philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, social welfare, 
sociology, teacher education and world music. Students interested 
in studying for a minor should consult with the chairman of the 
department offering the minor. 



Application 

An applicant for admission to the arts and sciences program 
must be a graduate of an approved secondary school or the equiva- 
lent. While no set program of high school subjects is prescribed, an 
applicant must meet the standard of the university in respect to the 
high school average and present 15 acceptable units of satisfactory 
work, including 9 or more units of college preparatory subjects. 
Satisfactory scores on College Entrance Examination Board 
(S.A.T.) or American College Testing Program tests (A.C.T.) are 
required. 



Core Requirements 

Students enrolled in degree programs in the School of Arts and 
Sciences take a group of core requirements, usually during the first 
two years of college training. These course requirements and those 
prescribed by the students' major department must be met by all 
Arts and Science students. 



Bachelor of Arts 




18 s.h. 


English and Humanities 


3 
3 
6 
6 


English Composition 
English Composition and Literature 
*Fine Arts 
Literature 


24 s.h. 


Social Sciences 


3 
6 

3 


Economics 

History, of which 3 s.h. must be either 

Western Civilization I or Western 

Civilization II 
Philosophy 



46 



3 
3 
3 


Psychology 
Sociology 
Political Science 


3 


A course chosen from any Social Science 




department 


11-12 s.h. 


** Science and Mathematics 




Physics 

Chemistry 

Science 




Biology 
Mathematics 



Total 53-54 semester hours. 
*Fine arts includes art, music, and theater. 
** Students must elect at least one semester of a laboratory science 
with lab. 



Department of Biology, Environmental 
Studies, and General Science 

Chairman: Professor H. Fessenden Wright, Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 

Professors: Dinwiddie C. Reams, Jr., D.Eng., Yale University; 
Burton C. Staugaard, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts. 

Assistant Professors: Dennis L. Kalma, Ph.D., Yale University; 
Henry E. Voegeli, Jr., Ph.D., University of Rhode Island. 

Instructor: Joel W. Blaskey, M.A. Fairfield University, M.S., 
University of Bridgeport. 

Biology provides one of the basic cornerstones in a liberal edu- 
cation by increasing the knowledge and appreciation of oneself and 
of the other living organisms in the ecosphere. As a major, biology 
prepares the student for professional or graduate training or for 
technical jobs in one of the health or life-science fields. Because of 
the close relationship to chemistry, physics, psychology and sociol- 
ogy, biology provides an area for an academic minor concentration 
for students majoring in these and other disciplines such as business 
or engineering. 

47 



Requirements for the major 

Each program includes botany, zoology, microbiology, genetics, 
and general ecology. In the B.A. and A.S. programs one or two 
terms, respectively, of Greneral Biology with laboratory are re- 
quired. Thus, the A.S. program is essentially the first two years of 
the B.A. program. The upper level course requirements of each 
four-year program differ slightly, but each demands histology, bio- 
organic and bio-chemistry, and seminar. 

Minor Program — 21 credit hours 

Associate in Science — a two-year program with several specialty 
options 

Bachelor of Science — with greater concentration in Biology 

Bachelor of Science — pre medical, pre-dental, pre-veterinary pro- 
gram 

Bachelor of Science — biology and education combination 

(Contains the necessary courses for certification to teach in the 
public schools) 

Bachelor of Science — biological illustration (art and biology com- 
bination) 

Bachelor of Science — biochemistry (biology and chemistry combi- 
nation) 



Premedical Program 

The premedical program is the most demanding, since it in- 
cludes all the requirements of the top medical schools plus the 
requirements of the Biology Department and the School of Arts and 
Sciences. To graduate, 132 credit hours are needed. 



Requirements for the minor 

A total of 21 credit hours which include general biology, botany, 
zoology, genetics, ecology and microbiology is required. An upper 
level course may be substituted for general biology under certain 
conditions. 

48 



Concentration in Biology 

A total of 28 credit hours is required. The subjects listed under 
the minor must be completed plus two other upper-level courses. An 
example is the business biology program. 



Bioengineering 

No rigid group of courses constitute a minor or a concentration 
in bioengineering. Students wishing to follow such a program 
should major in one aspect of engineering and take a minor (21 
credit hours) or a concentration (29 credit hours) in Biology. Consul- 
tation with departmental chairmen of the particular engineering 
and biology department should be made before starting the pro- 
grams. 

A program in bio engineering may be worked out by conference 
with a member of the engineering faculty and one in the biology 
department. A student majoring in engineering may take a con- 
centration (28 or more credit hours) in biology, or a biology major 
may take a concentration in engineering. 

Nutrition Minor 

Courses to be taken to fulfill this minor are: nutrition, food 
science, biochemistry I and 11, microbiology, nutrition and disease 
in addition to General Biology I and II with laboratory (or with 
Human Biology replacing General Biology II). 

A Master of Science program in Environmental Studies is now 
offered by the Graduate School. This program has both an engineer- 
ing and a science option. More may be learned about this program 
from the Graduate School catalog. 



Environmental Studies 

Minor in Environmental Studies 
Associate in Science Program: two-years 
Bachelor of Science Program: four-years 

Options: Air-Water Control and Management 

Environmental Health (Pre-Public Health or Pre- 

Sanitarian) 

Community Ecology 

49 



The Associate program is designed to lead directly into the 
bachelor's program, if a student wishes to continue his studies. 
Evening students often prefer to obtain an associate degree on their 
way to completing the requirements for the Bachelor of Science 
degree. The Associate in Science program provides a terminal de- 
gree for those who intend to work or already work in the environ- 
mental field, but who are trained in engineering, chemistry or busi- 
ness and lack the necessary background and training in biology and 
ecology required today in the practice of environmental control and 
management. 

The three options of the B.S. program have a similar group of 
core subjects, but there is considerable variation between the upper 
level courses of these programs. 

The air-water option is oriented towards the engineering, 
chemical and biological testing, control and management of en- 
vironmental pollutants. 

The environmental health option stresses the bio-medical as- 
pects of the environmental pollutants as these affect mankind. 

The community ecology program has less stress on the physical 
and biological sciences and on mathematics. It is sociologically 
oriented and a large number of the specialty courses are in the areas 
of political science and public administration. Hence, this would be 
a usefull major for one considering work in these fields or one 
concerned with town planning or environmental law. 

Environmentalists find employment in several diverse types of 
business, as well as in municipal, state and federal governmental 
organizations. Besides testing and control of pollutants, jobs in 
equipment sales, administrative positions, laboratory research 
jobs, work with consulting firms and as industrial environmental 
safety experts are some employment opportunities for those major- 
ing in this new area. 

Usually specialized training is necessary if one eventually 
wishes an administrative job at a high salary level. These programs 
are designed to enable the student to enter a graduate or specialty 
school to continue his education. Examples of this advanced study 
would be a graduate program of environmental studies or engineer- 
ing, a school of forestry, a program in urban ecology or a school of 
public health. (See Graduate School catalog for M.S. program in 
environmental studies.) 

Those students interested in one of the optional programs in 
environmental studies should write to the departmental chairman 
for a copy of the specific program that is of interest. Students who 
plan to enter one of these programs should consult with the de- 

50 



partmental chairman (Biology Department) before registration or 
during the first week of their first term at the university. 



Honor Society 

Installed at the University of New Haven is a chapter of Beta 
Beta Beta, the Honor Society in Biology. Full membership requires 
an average of 3.0 in biological courses and 3.0 overall. Students 
majoring in biology with lower grades and those majoring in other 
areas may affiliate as associate members. The society promotes 
scholarship, research, and intellectural experiences outside of the 
classroom by presenting a series of guest lecturers during the school 
year. 



Courses in Biology, Environmental 
Studies and General Science 

Courses that are marked with an asterisk (*) are usually 
scheduled every other academic year. 

SO 111-112 Physical Science 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
The meaning of scientific concepts and terms and their relation to 
other areas of learning and to daily living. Development and unity 
of physical science as a field of knowledge. Includes astronomy, 
physics, chemistry, and geology. 

SC 113 Physical Science Laboratory 

Credit, 1 semester hour. 
Prerequisite: SC 111, to be taken with SC 112 or after. Direct 
experience with physical experimentation. Training in design, con- 
duct, analysis and reporting of physical experiments. Emphasis on 
historically important theories and experiments. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 115 Nutrition and Dietetics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Types of foods, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, hormones and the 
processes and products of digestion. Factors and effects of malnutri- 
tion and food additives. Concepts and composition of balanced and 
special diets. 

51 



SC 116 Fundamentals of Food Science 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Food sources, methods of preservation, storage, spoilage, sanita- 
tion, food contaminants and food as a waste product are discussed at 
an elementary level. One hour of class time per week will be devoted 
to field work. 

SC 121-122 General Biology 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
The major areas of biology, with concepts and theories of the science. 
Cell structure and function are stressed during the discussion of the 
various organ systems. Genetics, animal behavior, ecology, de- 
velopment, evolution and taxonomy are covered during the second 
term. 

SC 123 Human Biology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SC 121 or permission of the instructor. A condensed 
study of human anatomy and physiology stressing the major organ 
systems and emphasizing the nervous, skeletal, muscular, enodoc- 
rine, reproductive and sensory systems. Included are genetics, 
stress, physical anthropology, nutrition and contemporary bio- 
psychology, law enforcement, sociology and social services. For 
laboratory credit, where needed, SC 132 may be taken concurrently 
or £ifter completing the course. 

SC 126 Astronomy 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An introduction to astronomy and the methods employed by as- 
tronomers in obtaining and analyzing information of the universe 
around us. 

SC 131-132 General Biology Laboratory 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
To be taken with or after SC 121 or SC 122. The microscopic exami- 
nation of cells and tissues and the dissection of various organisms 
from the earthworm to the fetal pig. Other experiments relate to 
classroom materials. Laboratory Fee: $20.00 per semester. 

SC 135 Earth Science 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A dynamic systems-approach to phenomena of geology, oceanog- 
raphy and meteorology. Emphasis on inter-relations of factors and 
processes and on importance of subject matter to human affairs. 
Suitable for non-science as well as for science majors. 

52 



SC 146 Fundamentals of Oceanography 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Description of major aspects of geological, chemical, physical and 
biological oceanography. Emphasis on human use and disuse of 
oceans. Suitable for non-science as well as science majors. 

SC 201 Genetics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 122, SC 123, SC 251, or SC 252. Mendehan gene- 
tics and developments that have produced the modern concept of 
inheritance; the role of DNA and theories of the chemical basis of 
heredity. Various aspects of human, medicinal and population 
genetics and the role of these in evolutionary processes. 

*SC 202 Genetics Laboratory 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SC 201. Theory and techniques using flies, yeasts, 
bacteria and viruses to illustrate the classical genetic theories. An 
introduction to biometrics. One assigned lecture-laboratory session 
and one laboratory period unassigned. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 210 Human Anatomy and Physiology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131. Structure and function of the 
human body in health and disease. A study of the essential charac- 
teristics of all the organ systems and the way they contribute to the 
functions of the body as a whole. May be taken in place of SC 122, 
General Biology II, or SC 123, Human Biology. Course includes 3 
class hours and 1-3 hour laboratory per week. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 220 General Ecology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SC 251 or SC 252. The interactions of living or- 
ganisms, including man, with each other and with their environ- 
ment. Discussion of population regulation, habitats, food supply 
predation and distribution, community structure regulation, suc- 
cession and diversity: ecosystems, geochemistry and energy. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 223 Human Ecology Laboratory 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SC 220 or any other course in ecology. Laboratory or 
field work devoted to current environmental regional problems, 
such as population trends, land use, resources, pollution, waste 
disposal and transportation. Laboratory work involves social, 

53 



biological and physical aspects of ecology. The course includes 2 
lectures, 1 laboratory per week. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 224 Field Ecology 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 220 (May be taken concurrently). One hour of 
class and one afternoon of laboratory in which basic ecological 
concepts will be demonstrated by the gathering and interpretation 
of field and laboratory data. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 225 Evolution 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SC 122. Biochemical and organic evolution studied. 
Physical anthropology and paleontology introduced, the relation- 
ship of evolution to genetics and ecology. 
*SC 227 Entomology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 122 and SC 132 or SC 251. Study of classification, 
evolution, anatomy, development, ecology, life-cycle, genetics, and 
systematics of insects, arachnoids and myriapods. Insects as major 
competitors of man, as disease carriers, and their influences on 
history and culture. Laboratory exercises include culture, observa- 
tion and dissection of insects. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 251 Zoology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131 or Biology major. The general 
morphology and physiology of animals from the amoeba to man, 
taken phylum by phylum. Dissection of representative animals 
from the major phyla, special emphasis on the Phyla Invertebrata. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 
SC 252 Botany w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131 or Biology major. The compara- 
tive structure, function, habitat and evolutionary relationships of 
plants, techniques of plant identification and classification. Field 
trips conducted when possible. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 291-292 Biology Laboratory Teaching 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 122 and SC 132, and permission of the instructor. 
Designed for prospective teachers, department majors and labora- 
tory assistants. Students supervised by an instructor in techniques 
concerning laboratory instruction, testing, grading, purchase and 
inventory of supplies and equipment. 

54 



SC 301 Microbiology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131; or SC 251 or SC 252; CH 103. A 
history of microbiology and a survey of microbial life. Includes 
viruses, rickettsia, bacteria, blue-green algae and fungi; their envi- 
ronment, growth, reproduction, metabolism and relationship to 
man. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 302 Bacteriology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 122 and SC 132; CH 103. Theoretical and labora- 
tory study of the morphology, physiology and classification of bac- 
teria. The application of these facts to agriculture, industry, sanita- 
tion, public health and disease. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 303 Histology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131 or SC 251. Microscopic and chemi- 
cal structure of normal organs and tissues and their cell con- 
stituents as related to function. Microscopic observations, tissue 
staining and slide preparation. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 304 Immunology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
The nature of antigens and antibodies, formation and action of the 
latter, other immunologically active components of blood and tis- 
sues and various immune reactions. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 307 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SC 251. The structure, origin, and evolutionary his- 
tory of the vertebrate organ systems. In the laboratory, representa- 
tive species of each vertebrate class dissected, with attention given 
to the individual organ systems. Laboratory Fee: $20. OQ. 

SC 308 General Physiology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 251-252, CH 105-106, PH 103-104, PH 105-106. 
Basic theories of physiology as applied to plants and animals. Prac- 
tical aspects and experimental techniques studied in the laboratory. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 309 Plant Morphology and Taxonomy w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SC 252. Comparative plant structure and reproduc- 
tion, particularly as related to the classification of plants. Labora- 

55 



tory involves examination of microscopic slides, models, preserved 
specimens and dissected materials. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 320 Forensic Medicine. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 123 Human Biology; SC 132 General Biology Lab 
II; CH 106 General Chemistry 11; CJ 215 Introduction to Forensic 
Science. Introduction to the medico-legal aspects of medicine, em- 
phasizing the relationship of the natural sciences. Injuries from 
various causes, effects of poisons, sex-offenses, autopsies and esti- 
mation of time of death will be covered. History of forensic medicine, 
its limitations and progress, odontology, malpractice and organ 
transplants will be discussed. 

SC 331 Animal Behavior 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 122 and P 111. Behavioral patterns of animals 
studied on a comparative basis. Laws and principles of ethology 
related to genetics, psychology, ecology, evolution, physiology and 
social structure. 

SC 361 Bio-organic Chemistry, w/Lab (Biochemistry I) 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 122, SC 132 or SC 251, and CH 106. Functional 
groups of organic compounds, the physiological properties of these 
classes of compounds, and the mechanisms of their elimination from 
the system. The interaction and s3Tithesis of these compounds will 
also be studied. Lipid and c£irbohydrate metabolism covered. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 362 Biochemistry II w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 361 or CH 104-108 or CH 301-302. Amino acids, 
proteins, enzymes, coenzymes, vitamins, carbohydrates, nucleaic 
acids, lipids and certain alkaloids are discussed as to their chemical, 
physical, and biological properties. Isolated enzyme reactions and 
the more important metabolic pathways are examined. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 401 Embryology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SC 251. Origin and development of tissues, organs and 
organ-systems during the embryonic and post-embryonic stages. In 
the laboratory, the chick grown and studied at various stages. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

56 



♦SC402 Cytology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SC 362. Structure and basic concepts of cellular and 
tissue function on the molecular, subcellular and cellular level, 
problems and techniques of cellular biology. Tissue culture 
techniques in laboratory. The microscope and audio-visual equip- 
ment also employed. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 501 Parasitology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SC 251. Life history, physiology, morphology, repro- 
ductive cycle and economic importance of most common parasites of 
plEints and animals. Spread and control of communicable and or- 
ganic diseases. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 502 Fresh Water and Marine Ecology 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 251, SC 252, and SC 222. Aquatic organisms, 
their life-cycles and their ecological factors. Causes of pollution 
when equilibria are upset. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 503 Pathology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SC 251. Causes, symptoms, progress, effect and con- 
trol of diseases of animals, primarily man. Laboratory observation 
of diseased cells, tissues and organs will be conducted partly at the 
University of New Haven and partly at St. Raphael's Hospital. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 504 Phycology and Mycology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 251, SC 252, and SC 301. Fresh-water, marine 
algae and the various types of fungi. Structure, physiology, life- 
cycles, reproduction, nutrition, ecology and their function as disease 
producers. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 505 Neuro-endocrine Physiology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: Pill; SC 123 or SC 212. Morphology and physiology 
of the neurological and endocrine systems as related to the control of 
body functions. Relationship to behavior with examples from 
psychobiology and ethology. 

SC 506 Sanitation and Food Science 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 301-302. All aspects of various types of sanitation 
covered, especially as related to food use, processing and preserva- 
tion. 

57 



SC 507 Characterization and Treatment of Wastes w/Lalj 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 135; SC 350; SC 361; or CH 201-202; CH 211; and 
M 117-118. The types of waste materials generated by agriculture, 
industry, transportation, municipalities and individuals are claS' 
sified, and the methods of the detection and identification and 
treatment of each type of waste material are covered. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 508 Water Quality Control and Pollution Ecology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 301 or SC 302; SC 502 and SC 507. Recognition of 
the organisms and materials of polluted waters and the selection of 
the most appropriate means of collection and analysis. Proper 
choice and use of analjrtical methods for determining water quality 
and methods of analyzing the data. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

SC 509 Scientific Photographic Documentation 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

2 lectures and 1 laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: SC 121-222 or SC 251-252 and instructor's permis- 
sion. Theory and practice of photographic image formation and 
recording. Lecture, demonstration and laboratory experience. 
Photography and documentation of natural objects, organisms and 
artifacts of biological, medical, pathological and forensic interests. 
Photomicroscopic, ultra-violet, infra-red, color and black and white 
techniques. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 510 General Environmental Health 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 122, SC 123 or SC 251; SC 301, or SC 302; and CH 
106. Communicable diseases and their spread and control; en- 
vironmental factors affecting public health applications of the prin- 
ciples of sanitation and health to the solution of environmental 
problems. Population trends and the collection and evaluation of 
statistics concerned with public health. Various aspects of preven- 
tive medicine. 

*SC 513 Environmental Pollutants w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CH 104-108; CH 211; or SC 302; SC 361-362. Physi- 
cal, chemical and biological properties and sources of the major 
pollutants. New and older methods of sampling, identification and 
measurement are presented. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

58 



*SC 514 Air Quality Control and Management w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SC 513 (can be taken concurrently). Historical presen- 
tation and definition of air pollution problems. Approaches for 
abatement and the strategy to achieve objectives of air quality that 
meet regional standards. Fundamentals of meteorology. Health and 
welfare effects of air pollutants, political and legal control mea- 
sures. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 515 Biophysics I w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CH 106; SC 362; PH 104-106; M 116. Principles and 
properties of large and small molecules in solutions, particularly in 
body fluids. Physical laws and theories of gases, liquids and solu- 
tions. Thermal chemistry and reaction rates as related to biological 
systems. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 516 Biophysics II w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CH 106; SC 362; PH 104-106; M 116. Physical laws 
and theories as related to muscle, skeletal, sense organ, nerve and 
other physiological actions. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 517-518 Bio-Techniques 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: Biology major and permission of instructor. Clinical 
and research techniques used in the biological sciences. Advanced 
microscopy, photomicroscopy, cell and tissue culturation, clinical 
techniques and instrumental procedures. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00 per semester. 

*SC 519 Pharmacology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 122 or SC 123 and SC 132; or SC 251-252; SC 361 
or CH 302. Science of medicinals and other chemicals and their 
effects produced by use and abuse on living organisms, the 
mechanisms whereby these effects are produced. Relation of struc- 
ture to activity methods of assay, and metabolic pathways involved. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 521 Toxicology w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 122 or SC 123 and SC 132, or SC 251-252; SC 361 
or CH 202; CH 211. The action of chemicals on living organisms. 
Relation of structure to activity, mechanisms of detoxication and 

59 



reason for activity studied. Methods of isolation, identification and 
characterization fi-om tissues, toxic limits, methods of assay, types 
of antidotes. Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*SC 524 Psychobiology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: P 111, SC 122 or 123, SC 132, and CH 106. A study of 
the biological factors of behavior, with concepts drawn from numer- 
ous related disciplines, such as physiology, pharmacology, ethnol- 
ogy, ecology, anthropology, psychology and biochemistry. 

SC 591-592 Seminar 

Credit, 2 semester hours 

1 credit hour per term 
Prerequisite: Biology major in junior or senior year. One hour 
weekly meetings during which prepared papers are read by the 
members of the class. Each student, with his adviser, must select an 
article in a biological periodical from which is developed a 20 min- 
ute discourse on its contents. 

SC 595-596 Laboratory Research 

Credit, 1 to 6 semester hours per term. 
Prerequisites: Biology major. Permission of the department. Choice 
of a research topic, literature search, planning of experiments, 
experimentation and correlation of results in a written report, 
under the guidance of a department faculty member. Three hours of 
work per week required per credit hour, (Amount of credit indicated 
by A, B, C, etc. after the course number; e.g., SC 595B - 2 credit 
hours.) Laboratory Fee: $20.00 per semester. 

SC 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours, maximum of 6, 
Prerequisites: Biology major. Permission of the department. 
Weekly conferences with advisor. Three hours of work per week 
required per credit hour. (Amount of credit indicated by A,B,C, etc. 
after the course number; e.g., SC 595B - 2 credit hours). 



Department of Chemistry 

Chairman: Associate Professor Peter J, Desio, Ph.D., University 
of New Hampshire. 

Associate Professors: Henry Lemaire, Ph.D., California Insti- 
tute of Technology; William H. Nyce, M.S., Southern Connecticut 
State College. 

60 



This major is offered by those students who wish to avail them- 
selves of the many career opportunities in the general field of 
chemistry and also for those who wish to go on to graduate work 
with a broad liberal background and a thorough grounding in a 
scientific discipline. 

Career opportunities exist in the following areas: management, 
technical purchasing or sales, research, product control, production, 
and product development in the chemical, pharmaceutical or re- 
lated industries; analysis and research in forensic science, energy, 
food, health, plastics, textile fibers, medicine, oceanography and the 
environmental sciences; sales and product development in the 
laboratory equipment field; and teaching. 

In addition to the regular programs, a student may elect options 
in the following areas: biology, business, engineering, environmen- 
tal studies, fire science, forensic science, pre-dental, premedical or 
pre-veterinary. Courses in each option are taken instead of the 
normal electives. For details of the options, the department chair- 
man should be consulted. 

Requirements for the Associate in Science Degree 

A student majoring in chemistry will find employment oppor- 
tunities in the areas of industry, government, and academic institu- 
tions. Positions are available as laboratory technicians or 
specialists in chemical, medical, forensic and environmental 
laboratories. An A.S. in chemistry provides the chemistry courses 
needed for admission to medical, dental or veterinary schools. The 
chemistry major must complete the following requirements for the 
Associate in Science degree for a total of 70 semester hours: E 113, 
206; 6 semester hours of elementary German or Russian or elec- 
tives; M 117, 118, 203; HS 111; P 111; PH 150, 205; CH 105, 106, 
201, 202, 211, 341; 3 semester hours of a restricted elective; and 
PE 111, 112. 

Requirements for the major 
Bachelor of Arts degree 

In addition to the core requirements, a major in chemistry must 
complete the following courses for a total of 126 semester hours 
minimum: M 117, 118, 203; PH 150, 205; 6 semester hours of 
French, German, or Russian (German recommended); 18 semester 
hours of electives (IE 102 and IE 224 recommended); and CH 105, 
106, 201, 202, 211, 341, 401, 421, 431, 432, 511, 512. 

61 



Bachelor of Science degree 

In addition to the core requirements, a major in chemistry must 
complete the following courses for a total of 126 semester hours 
minimum: M 117, 118, 203, 204; 6 semester hours of French, Ger- 
man or Russian (German recommended); IE 102; 3 semester hours 
of restricted elective (EE 224 recommended); 12 semester hours of 
electives; PH 150, 205; CH 105, 106, 201, 202, 211, 341, 351, 401, 
421, 431, 432, 441 or CH elective (CH 300 or higher), 451, 452, 511, 
512. 

Requirements for the minor 

Any student wishing to minor in chemistry should consult with 
the chairman of the dep£irtment to plan his program. The minimum 
number of credits required is 19 with a maximum of 24. The minor 
in chemistry includes CH 105, 106; CH 107 and CH 108 or CH 201 
and CH 202; CH 211; and CH 341 or elective (elective should be 
chosen from CH 300 series or above). 

The University of New Haven has a chemistry club which is a 
student affiliate of the American Chemical Society (ACS) and is 
open to all chemistry majors. Students who are not ACS student 
affiliates may be club members. The club provides students and 
faculty with a further chemical and social experience not found in 
classroom work. The chemistry club offers guest speakers, films, 
field trips and group discussions, as well as other activities. Stu- 
dents of the university community are invited to participate in all of 
the club's functions. 



Courses in Chemistry 

CH 103 Introduction to General Chemistry w/Lab 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Introductory course in inorganic chemistry dealing with elements, 
compounds, balancing equations, stoichiometry, nomenclature, 
chemical bonding, the periodic table and solutions. Laboratory 
work involves experiments related to the material covered in lec- 
tures. Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

CH 105 General Chemistry I w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 103 or one high school unit of chemistry, or writ- 
ten qualifying examination. Brief review of fundamentals, applica- 

62 



tion of nuclear reactions, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, the 
production and properties of metals, the properties of the halogen 
and sulfur groups and solutions. Laboratory work related to the 
material covered. Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

CH 106 General Chemistry II w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 105. Acids, bases, and salts, chemical equilibria, 
chemical bonding, solutions, the chemistry of nitrogen, carbon, 
silicon and boron; the use of spectroscopy to determine structure of 
compounds. Laboratory work includes experiments in qualitative 
analysis. Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

CH 107 Elementary Organic Chemistry 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 103 or CH 105 or permission of the department. A 
one-semester introduction to one of the major fields of chemistry 
designed for students not majoring in chemistry. Nomenclature, 
structure and the principal reactions of aliphatic and aromatic 
organic chemistry will be studied. 

CH 108 Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

Credit, 1 semester hour. 
Prerequisite: CH 103 or CH 105 or permission of instructor. A 
laboratory course designed to accompguiy CH 104. The principal 
operations of organic synthesis such as refluxing, distillation, fil- 
tration and crystallization are studied and applied in a number of 
simple preparations. Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

CH 109 Chemistry for Modern Times 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 103 or permission of instructor. This is a general 
course dealing with the physical and chemical properties of sub- 
stances used daily such as paints, plastics, cosmetics, vitamins, 
antibiotics, hormones and poisonous substances. 

CH 110 Environmental Chemistry 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 105 or consent of instructor. A survey of the 
principal environmental contaminants and pollutants, including 
such air and water contaminants as heavy metals, radioactive par- 
ticles, insecticides, detergents and others. Chemistry sufficient to 
understand the properties of these materials and possible routes to 
their control will be introduced. 

63 



CH 115 History of Chemistry 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 103 or permission of instructor. The history of 
chemistry beginning with ancient civilizations through the middle 
ages and the alchemist's search for gold. The discovery of the vari- 
ous elements and the periodic table. The lives of chemistry's great 
men and women, chemistry's contribution to the atomic age. 

CH 120 Chemistry of Addicting and Hallucinogenic Drugs 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 103 or permission of instructor. The properties, 
dosages, preparation and reactions of the addicting and hal- 
lucinogenic drugs. Alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, sedatives, stimu- 
lants, tranquilizers, LSD, mescaline, cannabis, narcotics and anti- 
depressants. 

CH 201-202 Organic Chemistry w/Lab 

Credit, 8 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 106. The common reactions of aliphatic and 
aromatic chemistry, emphasis on reaction mechanisms. Laboratory 
assignments on the technique needed in organic synthesis. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 

CH 211 Quantitative Analysis w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 106. Theory and laboratory training in the prep- 
aration of solutions, volumetric and gravimetric analysis and the 
use of special laboratory instruments. Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

CH 321-322 Plastics and Polymer Chemistry 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CH 106, CH 202. All phases of the plastics and poly- 
mers field, including the chemistry involved, methods, properties of 
the plastics and uses of the various materials. 

CH 341 Instrumental Methods of Analysis w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CH 106, CH 211, CH 201. The theory of various 
instrumental methods, including visible ultraviolet and infrared 
spectroscopy, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry and nuclear 
magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Laboratory identification of com- 
pounds by the methods discussed in the lectures. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

64 



CH 351 Qualitative Organic Chemistry w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 202. A one-semester laboratory course dealing 
with the systematic identification of organic compounds. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

CH 401-402 Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 202. The mechanism of organic reactions, ad- 
vanced problems in synthetic organic chemistry and special topics 
such as stereochemistry and photochemistry. 

CH 421-422 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry w/Lab 

Credit, 8 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 431. Corequisite: CH 432. Modern structural con- 
cepts, reaction mechanisms, the application of principles of physical 
chemistry and bonding theory in inorganic chemistry. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

CH 431-432 Physical Chemistry w/Lab 

Credit, 8 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CH 106, PH 205 and M 203. Fundamental laws of 
gases, thermodynamics, the theory of atomic and molecular struc- 
ture, kinetics and phase equilibria. Laboratory work enables the 
student to evaluate this subject by studying physical and chemi- 
cal data. Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester, 

CH 433 Advanced Physical Chemistry 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 432. Emphasis on the fundamentals of quantum 
mechanics, statistical mechanics, molecular bonding theory and 
spectroscopy. Offered only in the evening. 

CH 441 Analytical Chemistry w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 431. Corequisite: CH 432. Application of instru- 
mental methods to inorganic and organic methods of analysis, in- 
cluding mass, ultraviolet and infrared spectrophotometry, 
chromatography and electroanalytical analysis. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

CH 451-452 Thesis for Undergraduate Chemistry 
Majors w/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CH 202 CH 432. An original investigation in the 
laboratory under the guidance of a member of the department. Oral 

65 



discussion of the completed work before the staff at the end of the 
second semester. Final thesis report. Departmental approval re- 
quired. Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 

CH 461 Chemical Spectroscopy: Technique 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 432. Introduction to the elementary theory with 
emphasis on techniques and interpretation of data obtained in ap- 
plications of infrared, Raman, visible ultraviolet, nuclear quad- 
rupole, electron spin and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy 
to the solution of chemical problems. Offered only in the evening. 

CH 511-512 Seminar I and II 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CH 202, CH 432. Reports and discussions in various 
fields of chemistry reviewed by students and staff. 

CH 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 credit hours per semester with 

a maximum of 12. 
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of depart- 
ment. Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty 
member to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be 
initiated by the student. 

Plant Visitations 

Credit, none. 
Open to junior and senior chemistry majors. Visits to plants in the 
area to investigate plant and laboratory facilities in the chemical 
industry. 

SC 361-362 Biochemistry w/Lab 

Credit, 8 semester hours. 
See description under Science and Biology. 



Department of Communication 

Chairman: Associate Professor Gilbert L. Whiteman, Ph.D., 

Michigan State University. 
Assistant Professors: Thomas A. Nash, Ph.D., Michigan State 

University; Steven A. Raucher, Ph.D., Wayne State University. 

The basis of all human understanding is communication. 
Words, in and of themselves have no meaning. Only people have 
meaning. The communication program at the University of New 

66 



Haven allows each student to develop his interpersonal and mass 
communication skills and awareness through a sequentially pat- 
terned series of course offerings. 

Complete information about the Bachelor of Science and 
Bachelor of Arts degree programs in communication is listed in the 
Business Administration section of this catalog. Also included are 
courses listings and information concerning communications as 
a minor field of study. 



Department of English 

Chairman: Professor Paul Marx, Ph.D., New York University. 

Director of Freshman English: Assistant Professor Donald M. 
Smith, M.A., Columbia University. 

Professors: Robert T. Howling, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity; Douglas Robillard, Ph.D., Wayne State University. 

Associate Professors: Carroll P. Cole, D.F.A., Yale University; 
Bertrand Mathieu, Ph.D., University of Arizona. 

Assistant Professors: Ramona Beeken, M.A., Trinity College; 
Srilekha Bell, Ph.D., Univeristy of Wisconsin; Bruce French, 
M.A., Harvard University; Camille Jordan, A.M., University of 
Chicago. 

The study of literature is at the heart of a liberal education. 
English and American literature taken together comprise one of the 
noblest monuments to man's intellect and creativity. In addition to 
its generally broadening effect, the study of literature will help the 
student to think critically and to make his writing and speaking 
more effective. A major in English is looked upon very favorably by 
admissions officers of law, medical, and dental schools. It is also 
good preparation for graduate work in such fields as business, 
education, urban planning, social work, and public health. 
Employers in many areas of business, industry, and government 
look favorably upon the college graduate who has both a rich 
background in literature and training in language. Such a person 
has breadth of knowledge and is able to communicate effectively. 

67 



Requirements for the major 

All English majors are required to take the English literature 
survey courses, E 211-212, and the American literature survey 
courses, E 213-214. English majors also must take these courses: 
History of the English Language, E 302, the two courses in Shake- 
speare, E 341-342, and either Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville, E 392, 
or The American Transcendentalists, E 393. In addition one course 
must be taken from each of the following three groups: 

1. The Age of Chaucer, E 375, The Renaissance in England, E 
323, English Drama to 1642, E 326, The Age of Donne and 
Milton, E 362. 

2. Literature of the Neoclassic Era, E 371, Literature of the 
Romantic Era, E 353, Later Nineteenth-Century Litera- 
ture, E 356. 

3. English Novel I, E 390, English Novel H, E 391, Modern 
British Literature, E 361, American Literature Between 
World Wars, E 477, Contemporary American Literature, E 
478, Studies in Literature (any course numbered between E 
481 and E 498). 

While study of a foreign language is not required, it is strongly 
recommended that the student who majors in English know at least 
one foreign language. Knowledge of a foreign language makes one 
more sensitive to the use and meaning of words in one's own lan- 
guage. Furthermore, knowledge of a foreign language widens one's 
perspective and deepens one's understanding through the insights 
gained into another culture. Students who are considering graduate 
study certainly should become competent in at least one foreign 
language. 

So that students will become familiar with another culture, the 
department requires English majors to take at least one semester of 
continental literature, a course that focuses on the literature of a 
different major European culture each semester it is offered. 



Requirements for the minor 

A total of 18 semester hours in English, not including the two 
freshman-level courses, is required for a minor in English. This 
work must include the English Literature survey courses, E 211- 
212, and the American Literature survey courses, E 213-214. 

68 



The English Club 

The club is open to anyone associated with the university. Its 
aims are to encourage students to a greater love of good writing and 
to provide them with informal and diversified encounters with 
professional writers and discussions of the literary arts on campus. 
In addition to sponsoring films on writers and writing, lectures by 
well-known contemporary writers, and group excursions to local 
stage productions, the English Club publishes the University's stu- 
dent literary magazine, The Noiseless Spider. 

Courses in English 

EF English as a Second Language 

One semester, no credit. 
Designed for foreign-born students whose English is inadequate to 
do college-level work. Particular emphasis on individual pronuncia- 
tion problems and use of American English idioms. Laboratory 
required. 

EA College Preparatory English 

No credit, 1 semester. 
A review of the fundamentals of English for students who do not 
meet the English requirements for admission to the University. 
Practice given in writing as well as in grammar. 

EB Reading Laboratory 

No credit, 1 semester. 
Helps the student to read faster with greater comprehension, to 
increase vocabulary, and to study more effectively. Supervised 
reading, training films, exercises, and discussions. 

E 113 English Composition 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on English Placement 
Examination or completion of EA College Preparatory English. 
Theme writing with emphasis on thematic content, paragraphing, 
sentence construction, grammatical principles, and diction. Read- 
ing of essays to stimulate thought and illustrate rhetorical prin- 
ciples. 

E 201-202 The Western Tradition in Literature I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: E 1 13. Selected translations of European prose, poetry 
and drama from Homer to the present. 

69 



E 206 Composition and Literature 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: E 113. Further practice in theme writing. Reading 
of poetry, fiction, and drama in order to develop skill in analyzing 
and interpreting literature. 

E 211-212 Survey of English Literature I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: E 113, E 206. Readings in English Literature from its 
beginnings to the present, with attention to historical and social 
backgrounds. 

E 213-214 Survey of American Literature I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: E 113, E 206. Intellectual and literary movements 
from Colonial times to the present, with attention to historical and 
social backgrounds. 

E 217-218 Survey of Black American Literature 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Black American poets, novelists, essayists, and dramatists from the 
Colonial Era to the present, including such writers as Frederick 
Douglass, W. E. B. DuBois, Countee Cullen, Richard Wright, James 
Baldwin, Leroi Jones and Eldridge Cleaver, 

E 220 Writing for Business and Industry 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: E 113. Intensive practice in the various types of writ- 
ing required of executives, businessmen, engineers, and other pro- 
fessionals, with emphasis on business letters, internal and external 
reports, evaluations and recommendations, descriptions of proce- 
dures and processes. 

E 230 Public Speaking and Group Discussion 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Objectives are to develop proficiency in organizing and presenting 
material, and to give practice in speaking, group interaction, con- 
ference management and small group discussion. 

E 260 The Short Story 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A critical study of the best stories of American and British writers 
as well as stories, in translation, of writers of other nationalities and 
cultures: French, German, Russian, Latin American, African. 

70 



E 261 The Essay 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A study of contemporary essays and the great essays of the past. 

E 267-268 Creative Writing 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Practice in writing the short story, poetry, drama, or non-fiction; 
choice of genre based upon inclination and ability of the student. 
Analysis of published materials and student work. May be taken for 
one or two semesters. 

E 270 Forms of Contemporary Culture 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A study of contemporary culture in a variety of forms, including 
drama, films, TV, periodicals, music, art. Students will be expected 
to attend performances and exhibitions. The goal of the course is to 
give the student a better understanding of the scope and meaning of 
contemporary cultural phenomena and to further the development 
of the critical sensibility. 

E 275 Film Studies 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A consideration of significant full-length feature films selected to 
represent a national school of film-making, a genre, the respective 
crafts of directors, performers and script-writers. Films will be 
shown in class and studied at the rate of about one a week. 

E 301 Literary Criticism and Scholarship 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Major critical theories, with readings from Plato and Aristotle to 
the present. Bibliographic tools and methods of research. 

E 302 History of the English Language 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The structure and development of English, including Indo- 
European origins and elements of Anglo-Saxon. Emphasis on Mid- 
dle English and the transition to Modern English. Study of the 
distinctive coinages of American English. 

E 323 The Renaissance in England 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Major writers of the English Renaissance, in poetry and prose, from 
Wyatt and Surrey in the early sixteenth century through Sidney 
and Spenser to Donne and Milton. 

71 



E 326 English Drama to 1642 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The development of the English drama from its beginnings to the 
middle of the seventeenth century, excluding Shakespeare. Major 
emphasis upon the Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. 

E 341-342 Shakespeare 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Introduction to representative comedies, histories, plays, tragedies 
and poems. 

E 353 Literature of the Romantic Era 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Poetry and prose of the major Romantics — Wordsworth, Coleridge, 
Byron, Shelley, Keats, Lamb, and Hazlitt — with attention given to 
the milieu of the writers, the Continental background and theories 
of Romanticism. 

E 356 Later Nineteenth-Century English Literature 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Poetry and prose from 1830-1900. The works of Tennyson, Brown- 
ing, Arnold, Swinburne, Carlyle, Mill, Newman, Ruskin and others 
studied in the light of the social, political and religious problems of 
the period. 

E 361 Modern British Literature 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
British fiction, drama, and poetry from 1900 to the present. Includes 
works of Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Huxley, Forster, Shaw, 
Yeats, Auden, Spender and Dylan Thomas. 

E 362 The Age of Donne and MUton 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Major writers of prose and poetry during the period 1600-1660: 
Donne, Milton, Burton, Bacon, Herbert and others. 

E 371 Literature of the Neoclassic Era 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
British writers of the period 1660-1789, with emphasis upon Dry- 
den, Pope, Swift and Johnson. 

E 375 The Age of Chaucer 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A detailed reading and critical study of Chaucer's Canterbury 
Tales, with some study of his predecessors and the medieval cul- 
tural milieu. 

72 



E 390 The English Novel I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The development of the novel in England from Defoe to Dickens and 
Thackeray. 

E 391 The EngUsh Novel II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The development of the novel in England from George Eliot and 
Hardy to the present. 

E 392 Poe, Hawthorne and Melville 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A study of the poetry and fiction of the major representatives of the 
tragic outlook on life in mid-nineteenth century American litera- 
ture, Poe, Hawthorne and Melville. 

E 393 The American Transcendentalists 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An intensive study of the £iffirmative tradition in mid-nineteenth 
century American literature, with particular attention to the prin- 
cipal figures, Emerson, Thoreau and Whitman. 

E 395 American Realism and Naturalism 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Readings in the works of such major Realists as Howells, Twain, 
and James and important Naturalist successors such as Frank 
Norris, Stephen Crane and Theodore Dreiser. 

E 402 Modern Poetry 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A study of the works of representative twentieth-century British, 
American, and Continental poets. 

E 405 Modern Drama 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Principal movements in Continental, British, and American drama 
from Ibsen to the present. 

E 406-409 Continental Literature 

Credit, 3 semester hours each course. 
Selected poetry, drama, and fiction, in translation, of the European 
masters, primarily Russian, French, German, or Spanish. Topic to 
be announced for each semester. 

E 411-412 The Literature of Africa 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
The chief writings, in English and in translation, of the prose 
writers, poets, and dramatists of the African nations. 

73 



E 421 Contemporary Jewish Writers in America 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Intensive study of the poetry, prose, and drama of such writers as 
Shapiro, Ginsberg, Bellow, Malamud, Miller, Roth, Friedman, and 
others whose works have been influenced by their Jewish heritage 
and by the American literary tradition. 

E 477 American Literature Between World Wars 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A study of the achievements of the main figures of the heroic 
generation that flourished between the two world wars and brought 
about "America's Coming-of-Age." Poets Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, 
Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, and William Carlos Williams. 
Novelists Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald. 

E 478 Contemporary American Literature 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Intensive study of recent American fiction, poetry, and drama. 

E 481-498 Studies in Literature 

Credit, 3 semester hours each course. 
Special topics in literature which may include concentration upon a 
single figure, a group of writers, or a literary theme. Several sec- 
tions, each on a different topic, may run concurrently. 

E 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a maximum of 

12. 
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of depart- 
ment. Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty 
member to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be 
initiated by the student. 



Courses in Foreign Languages 

Coordinator: Assistant Professor Bruce French, M.A., Harvard 
University. 

FR 101-102 Elementary French 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Stresses pronunciation, aural and reading comprehension, basic 
conversation, and the fundamental principles of grammar. 

74 



FR 201-202 Intermediate French 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: French 101-102 or equivalent. Stresses the reading 
comprehension of modern prose texts and a review of grammar 
necessary for this reading. Students are encouraged to do some 
reading in their own areas of interest. 

FR 301-302 Main Currents of French Literature 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: FR 201-202 or equivalent. Writings representative of 
significant currents in French literature from the Middle Ages to 
the Twentieth Century. Opportunity to improve listening and 
speaking ability. Conducted in French. Laboratory optional, but 
recommended. 

GR 101-102 Elementary German 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Stresses pronunciation, aural and reading comprehension, basic 
conversation, and the fundamental principles of grammar. 

GR 201-202 Intermediate German 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: GR 101-102 or the equivalent. Stresses the reading 
comprehension of modern prose texts and a review of grammar 
necessary for this reading. Texts used in the course are selected 
from many areas of study including physics, biology, and chemistry 
and students are encouraged to do individualized readings in their 
own areas of interest. 

RU 101-102 Elementary Russian 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Stresses pronunciation, aural and reading comprehension, basic 
conversation, and the fundamental principles of grammar. This 
course is usually offered every other year, unless demand requires it 
be taught every year. 

RU 201-202 Intermediate Russian 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: RU 101-102 or the equivalent. Stresses the reading 
comprehension of modern Russian prose and a review of grammar 
necessary for this reading. Students are encouraged to do some 
reading in their own areas of interest. Scientific Russian is encour- 
aged for those in the sciences. 

75 



SP 101-102 Elementary Spanish 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Stresses pronunciation, aural and reading comprehension, basic 
conversation, and the fundamental principles of grammar. 

SP 201-202 Intermediate Spanish 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SP 101-102 or equivalent. Stresses the reading com- 
prehension of modern prose texts and a review of grammar neces- 
sary for this reading. Students are encouraged to do some reading in 
their own areas of interest. 

SP 301-302 Main Currents of Spanish Literature 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SP 201-202 or equivalent. Writings representative of 
significant currents in Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to 
the Twentieth Century. Opportunity to improve speaking and lis- 
tening ability. Conducted in Spanish. Laboratory optional, but rec- 
imended. 



Courses in Theater Arts 

Coordinator: Professor John Collinson, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. 

T 131-132 Introduction to the Performing Arts 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Dramatic arts such as theater, opera, ballet, film. Historical de- 
velopment, particular problems, special possibilities, and informed 
appreciation. Practical work in a medium. 

T 141-142 World Drama and Theater 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Dramatic literature from classical times to the present. 

T 341-342 Acting and Directing 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Emphasis on acting during the first semester and directing during 
the second. The student may participate in workshop productions. 

T 491-492 Performing Arts Seminar 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Special areas of the performing 
arts: drama, film, dance, radio, television. Criticism, writing, di- 
recting, performing, design. 

76 



T 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 

a maximum of 12. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This couse must be initiated by 
the student. 



Department of Fine Arts 

Chairman: Associate Professor Elizabeth MofiEitt, M.A., Hunter 
college. 

Assistant Professor: Edward J. Maffeo, M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity. 

Instructor: John E. Devine, M.F.A., Yale University. 

Study of the visual arts provides opportunity for self realization 
and gives the individual a perception of his relationship to society. 
The various programs are designed to develop an esthetic sensitiv- 
ity to visual materials and the psychic response to them leading the 
student to the formulation of his own expressive statements in a 
variety of fields. Foundation courses in the basics of two and three 
dimensional design, color and drawing, plus work in such major 
disciplines as painting and sculpture, provide the student with the 
necessary vocabulary for effective visual communication. 

An awareness of the development of art throughout man's 
cultural evolution, from the cave man to the present day, is provided 
through the study of art history and the contemporary art scene. 
With this combination of the development of his own creative pow- 
ers with a sense of the art historical matrix of which he is a part, the 
student also acquires an excellent preparation for graduate study in 
such fields as art eduction, graphic design, industrial design, en- 
vironmental design, architecture, communication, fine arts and 
art history. 

Career opportunities for those competent in the visual arts are 
numerous including art directors in a broad field of business and 
industry. The student may also choose to develop his creative poten- 
tial by following a number of vocational programs offered at the 
university in such fields as biological illustration, interior design, 
fashion design and commercial and advertising art. 

77 



Requirements for the major 

The art major must complete a minimum of 42 hours of art for 
the bachelor's degree in fine arts. Flexibility of planning is provided 
but the student must adhere to the following basic outline of 
courses: AT 101-102, Introduction to Studio Art, AT 105, Basic 
Drawing, At 201, Painting I, History of Art, 6 semester hours, AT 
211-212, Design I and II, AT 302, Figure Drawing, and AT 401, 
Studio Seminar I. Art majors are encouraged to select courses in art 
beyond the minimum requirements. 

The student should consult with his faculty advisor concerning 
the requirements for the major in the fields of biological illustra- 
tion, interior design and fashion design. An Associate in Science 
degree is offered in commerical and advertising art which requires a 
minimum of 24 semester hours of art. 



Requirements for the minor 

A total of 18 semester hours of work in art is required for the 
minor in art. This must include AT 101, Introduction to Studio Art I, 
AT 211 or AT 212, Design I or II, and AT 105, Basic Drawing, and 
any other combination of courses which fill his needs and interests. 



Courses in Art 

AT 101-102 Introduction to Studio Art 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Foundation study in the visual arts designed to heighten the stu- 
dent's sensitivity and awareness. Problems in drawing, painting 
and design using a variety of materials. 

AT 104 Weaving 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Introduction to basic techniques, including tapestry, using simple 
looms with study of various fibers. 

AT 105 Basic Drawing 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A disciplined study in the fundamentals of free hand drawing in- 
cluding drawing objects from nature, study of perspective, exercises 
in coordination of hand and eye. Manipulation of line for articula- 
tion of form and space. Figure drawing. 

78 



AT 122 Layout and Printing Techniques 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: AT 211 or AT 212; AT 312 or consent of instructor. 
Techniques of layout, lettering, and design in relation to printing 
methods. 

AT 201 Painting I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Problems in pictoral composition involving manipulation of form 
and color. Various techniques of applying pigment will be explored 
as well as mixing pigments, stretching and priming canvases. 

AT 202 Painting II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A continuation of Art 201, Painting I, with further exploration of 
two dimensional pictorial arrangements of form and color for 
greatest visual effectiveness. The student will be encouraged to 
develop his own personal idiom in the medium. 

AT 203 Commercial Art I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: AT 211 or AT 212; AT 122 and AT 312 or consent of 
instructor. Exploration of basic graphic design problems emphasiz- 
ing typography and composition to develop the student's ability to 
effectively communicate ideas and feeling through visual means. 

AT 204 Commercial Art II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: AT 203 or consent of instructor. A continuation of AT 
203, Commerical Art I, with emphasis on the application of design 
principles in actual job situations from the original concept to the 
mechanical. 

AT 205 Ceramics I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Introduction to clay as an expressive medium. Hand built and wheel 
thrown methods with various glazing and decorative techniques. 
Stacking and firing kilns. Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

AT 206 Ceramics II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Continuation of AT 215, Ceramics I, with free exploration of novel 
and experimental approaches to the medium. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

79 



AT 211-212 Design I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Exploration of basic visual elements; line, color, texture, shape, 
size, volume, space, and the psychic response they elicit. Effective 
organization of visual means in both two and three dimensional 
design. Interaction of color. 

AT 231 History of Art to the Renaissance 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
World art as an expressive and social phenomenon from its earliest 
beginnings, through religious and cultural cycles to the visual de- 
velopments of the Renaissance. 

AT 232 History of Modern Art 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Art from the Renaissance to the Twentieth Century in Europe and 
America; a continuation of Art 231. 

AT 233 History of Interior Design 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A survey of developments in the decorative arts from antiquity to 
the present day. Special consideration of the esthetic and practical 
relationships of architectural space to interior decor. 

AT 302 Figure Drawing 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Study of the human figure and anatomy with exploration of various 
methods of graphic and expressive depiction of its shifting axes and 
volumes. Use of a variety of drawing materials. 

AT 304 Sculpture I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The exploration of three dimensional materials for maximum effec- 
tiveness in expressive design. Experimentation with clay, plaster, 
wood, stone, canvas, wire screening, metal, found objects, 
etc. Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

AT 305 Sculpture II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A continuation of AT 311, Sculpture I, with further exploration of 
three-dimensional materials and the possibilities they present for 
creative visual statements. Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

AT 312 Lettering 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: AT 211. Design and execution of basic hand lettering 
with pen and brush; utilization of hand lettering and type in the 

80 



design of printed matter; use of letter forms as an element of visual 
design. 

AT 313-314 Photography I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Introduction to basic techniques, materials and esthetic aspects of 
black and white photography. Laboratory course with emphasis on 
the individual student's image making. Photography II gives spe- 
cial attention to problems dealing with images in groups, series and 
sequences. New techniques and technical demonstrations. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

AT 317 Interior Design 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: AT 211 or 212; AT 233 or consent of instructor. A 
basic studio course with exploration of interior design problems and 
their relationship to architecture. Special emphasis on exploitation 
of space, form, color and textures for greatest effectiveness. 

AT 319 Textile Design 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: AT 104; AT 211 or AT 212 or consent of instructor. 
Studio course in design of fabrics; study of various fibers and their 
characteristics for practical application in fashion and interior 
design. 

AT 320 Fashion Design 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: AT 211 or 212 or consent of instructor. Studies in 
fashion design with particular attention to the characteristics of 
various fabrics; color, texture, pattern and draping qualities as used 
in fashion applications. 

AT 322 Illustration 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A solid foundation in the techniques of creative illustration. Vari- 
ous media and their expressive possibilities will be studied; char- 
coal, pencil, pen and ink, wash, colored pencils, acrylic, etc. 

AT 331 Contemporary Art 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Art as an expressive and social phenomenon from 1945 through the 
developmental happenings of the present. 

AT 333 Survey of Afro-American Art 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Black art in the United States from the Colonial period to the 

81 



present. Consideration of African cultural influences. Analysis of 
modern trends in Black Art. 

AT 401 Studio Seminar I 

Credit, 1-4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: AT 101-102, AT 201, AT 302 or AT 313, and Art 
electives. Drawing on his development through his previous study 
the student will concentrate on major projects in areas of his choice. 

AT 402 Studio Seminar II 

Credit, 1-4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: AT 401. Continuation of Studio Seminar I. 

AT 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a maximum 

of 12 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of depart- 
ment. Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty 
member to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be 
initiated by the student. 



Department of Fire Science 

Chairman: Associate Professor William H. Nyce, M.S., Southern 
Connecticut State College. 



Bachelor of Science Programs 

Fire Science Third and Fourth Year Programs 

Fire Science Administration 

A student earning a bachelor's degree in Fire Science Ad- 
ministration is able to apply modern mangement techniques to the 
development and operation of a fire department. His program in- 
cludes the following courses: 

Essentials of Fire Chemistry, FS 301, Fire Protection Fluids 
and Systems, FS 303, Arson Investigation, FS 402, Process and 
Transportation Hazards, FS 403, Research Project, FS 498-499, 
Pre-Calculus Mathematics, M 115, or Finite Mathematics, M 127, 
Survey of Calculus, M 116, or Elementary Statistics, M 128, Intro- 
ductory Accounting, A 111, Principles of Economics, EC 133, Man- 
agement and Organization, MG 125, Industrial Relations, MG 231, 
General Physics and Lab, PH 104, PH 106, Introduction to Comput- 

82 



ers, IE 105 - COBOL, Personnel Administration, IE 223, Cost Con- 
trol, IE 233, Risk and Insurance, FI 227, Collective Bargaining in 
the Public Sector, PA 408, Contracts and Specifications, CE 407, 
and four electives. 



Fire Science Technology 

As its name implies, this program is more deeply concerned 
with the technological aspects of fire science. The stress is primarily 
on fire prevention. Many of the courses cover various engineering 
fields adapted to the problems that will confront the fire 
technologist. The essentials of fire chemistry, dynamics, statics, the 
way in which materials behave under various conditions or stress 
including heat, process and transportation, the design of industrial 
structures and conveyances for the maximum protection of the 
worker and the public are essential areas of study. Courses in fire 
suppression play a role almost equal to that of fire prevention. These 
include an investigation of fire suppression fluids and systems, 
hydraulics and thermodynamics. The student who completes this 
program is a planner, a designer of fire prevention systems, a judge 
of facilities and equipment. 

A total of 129 semester hours must be completed for either 
Bachelor of Science degree. This includes the associate degree cred- 
its, or their equivalent, earned at the University of New Haven or 
elsewhere. Equivalent work substitution is subject to evaluation by 
the Director of Fire Science. 



Associate in Science 
Fire and Safety 

This program provides the first two years for fire and safety 
oriented students. It serves as admission to the upper level fire 
science courses in administration or technology. 

Included in the program are the following courses: four fire 
science courses, E 113 and 206, P 111, M 127 and 128, CH 105, CH 
107 with 108; PE 111 and 112, IE 106, 216, 217 and 223, PH 103 and 
104, with lab., SC 121, 123 and 131, and SS 113. 

Students who have accomplished the above, or its equivalent, 
at other institutions are eligible for admission to the upper level fire 
science courses, subject to a record evaluation by the department 
chairman. 

83 



Courses in Fire Science 

FS 301 Essentials of Fire Chemistry 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The examination of the chemical requirements for combustion, the 
chemistry of fuels and explosive mixtures, and the study of the 
various methods of stopping combustion of fires. Analysis of the 
properties of materials affecting fire behavior. Detailed examina- 
tion of the basic properties of fire. 

FS 302 Principles of Fire Science Technology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Effect of fire on different types of construction, classes of occupancy 
hazard, levels of private and public protection, degrees of exterior 
exposure. Types of building construction, private water supplies, 
municipal water supplies, and combination systems. Methods of 
employee fire control. 

FS 303 Fire Protection Fluids and Systems 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Chemical properties of fluids used in fire suppression systems and 
operations. Design of water supply and distribution for fire protec- 
tion. Laboratory study of operational and hydraulics problems. 

FS 304 Fire Detection and Control 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Heat, sensitivity, thermostats, fusible elements, fire detection sys- 
tems, design and layouts, alarm systems, power sources, 
safeguards, municipal alarm systems, construction, installation 
and maintenance requirements, standards and codes. Automatic 
extinguishing systems, design and layout of water, gas and power 
systems. 

FS 402 Arson Investigation 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Methods used in starting fires and methods of detection of fires 
started by arsonists. Instrumental methods that may be used to 
assist in the investigation of fires started under suspicious cir- 
cumstances. 

FS 403 Process and Transportation Hazards 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Special hazards of industrial processing, manufacturing and the 
transportation of products and personnel. Analytical approach to 
hazard evaluation and control. Reduction of fire hazards in man- 
ufacturing processes. 

84 



FS 404 Special Hazards Control 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Types of industrial processes requiring special fire protection 
treatment such as heating equipment, flammable liquids, gases, 
and dusts. Emphasis on fundamental theories involved, inspection 
methods, determination of relative hazard, application of codes and 
standards, and economics of installed protection systems. 

FS 405 Fireground Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A study of the effective management of suppression forces at vari- 
ous fire situations. Includes consideration of pre-fire planning, 
problem identification and solution implementation. Case studies 
of actual and theoretical fire incidents, command control concepts, 
maximum utilization of forces available, priorities of action and 
logistics at large scale operations will be covered. 

FS 498-499 Research Project 

Credit, 3 semester hours over two semester period. 
One lecture per week — FS 498: credit, 1 semester hour. One lecture 
and one laboratory session per week — FS 499: credit, 2 semester 
hours. Development of a student project and a written report in a 
specified area in fire administration or fire science technology with 
faculty supervision. Grade awarded upon completion of project. This 
is a two semester course with FS 498 as a prerequisite for FS 499. 

FS 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 credit hours per semester with a maximum of 

12. 
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of depart- 
ment. Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty 
member to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be 
initiated by the student. 



Department of History 

Chairman: Professor Thomas Katsaros, Ph.D., New York Uni- 
versity. 

Associate Professors: Joseph B. Chepaitis, Ph.D., Georgetown 
University; Gwendolyn E. Jensen, Ph.D., University of Connec- 
ticut. 

Assistant Professor: Joseph F. Bernard Jr., Ph.D., Yale Univer- 
sity. 

85 



History provides the framework for a liberal education. The 
study of human experience — failures as well as achievements — is 
the core of historical study. It gives insight into related disciplines 
in the humanities and social sciences and broadens the perspective 
of students in professional fields of business administration and 
engineering, revealing the complexity and interrelatedness of 
human experience. 

History is also excellent preparation for a variety of careers in 
business, government, law, journalism, foreign service and many 
other areas. Because of the great variety of professional programs at 
the University of New Haven, the student interested in history can 
combine this interest with highly technical professional training. 

The department strives to meet its objectives by teaching not 
only content but critical and writing skills through reading, class 
presentation and discussion, research and writing. Historical 
methodology is stressed in all advanced courses, and students are 
urged to take the History Seminar in their senior year to sharpen 
their critical and analytical skills. 



Requirements for the major 

The history major must take at least 36 hours of courses in 
history. In addition to the basic survey of Western Civilization, HS 
111-112, and American History, HS 211-212, majors are required to 
include in their major work either the History of Ancient Greece 
and Rome, HS 321, or Renaissance and Reformation, HS 317, and 
one course in Asian History, HS 231, 406, or 409. The balance of the 
program will be worked out in consultation with an advisor. The 
department offers majors in the general program as well as in 
specific area studies that include American studies, European 
studies and economic history. A student who wishes to major in one 
of these areas should consult with his advisor for specific require- 
ments. 



Requirements for the minor 

A total of 18 semester hours' work in history is required for a 
minor in history. This work must include Western Civilization, HS 
111-112, and may include any other combination of courses in 
history that supports the student's interests and needs. 

86 



- The University of New Haven has a chapter of the Interna- 
tional Honor Society in History, Phi Alpha Theta, which is open to 
those students who have had 12 hours of history or more and have 
maintained an average of better than 3.0 in history courses and 
better than 2.9 overall. The university chapter of Phi Alpha Theta 
provides the students and faculty with a social and intellectual 
experience beyond classroom work, offering films, speakers, and 
roundtable discussions. Students not eligible for membership in the 
society are welcome to participate in all of the chapter's activities. 



Courses in History 

HS 111 Western Civilization I: to 1700 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Europe from its ancient beginnings to the eighteenth century. Its 
social, economic, political and cultural history. 

HS 112 Western Civilization II: from 1700 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Europe and its global impact from the eighteenth century to the 
present. Political, cultural and institutional development. 

HS 115 Economic History of the Western World: to 1914 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A survey of the economic history of the Western World from pre- 
industrial Europe to the First World War, historical, political, cul- 
tural and international developments. 

HS 116 Economic History of the Western World: 1914 to the 
Present 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: HS 115. Western economic development within a his- 
torical perspective from 1914 to the present. The international 
background and the Western response. 

HS 121 History of Science 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The development of science and technology from antiquity to the 
present. Their impact on society and the world. 

HS 131 History of the Black Man in America 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The history and background of Black people in the United States. 
Social, political and cultural development. 

87 



HS 211 American History to 1865 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Survey of American social, economic, political and diplomatic de- 
velopments from colonial times to 1865. 

HS 212 American History From 1865 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Survey of American history from 1865 to the present. Institutional 
and industrial expansion, periods of reform and adjustment. The 
U.S. as a world power. 

HS 221 Comparative European Political Systems 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Historical, comparative approach to the political and social institu- 
tions of the United Kingdom, U.S.S.R., Germany and France. 

HS 223 U.S. Diplomatic History 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The ideas, trends and interpretations of U.S. diplomacy from the 
American Revolution to the present. 

HS 231 Modern Asia 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The ideological, cultural and traditional political, economic and 
diplomatic history of East, South and Southeast Asia from the 16th 
century to the present. 

HS 308 U.S. Social and Intellectual History 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The ideological, cultural and social development of the American 
people. The impact of ideas on American life. 

HS 310 The History of Modern England 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The development of British history from the medieval period to the 
present; England's role in international affairs. 

HS 311 American Colonial and Revolutionary History to 1789 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The cultural and political background of British North America, 
Colonial and Revolutionary America. The creation of a republican 
society. 

HS 312 20th Century America 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The interaction of political, economic, social, intellectual and dip- 
lomatic events and their impact upon 20th century America. 



88 



HS 314 The History of Germany From 1648 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
German civilization from the seventeenth century to the present. 
Its impact on Europe and the world. 

HS 315 The History of Europe in the Nineteenth Century 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
European history from the Napoleonic period to World War I. Its 
internal development and world impact. 

HS 317 Renaissance and Reformation 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Europe from 1300 to 1650; from feudal state to nation state; reli- 
gious unity to diversity. 

HS 321 The History of Ancient Greece and Rome 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The rise and decline of ancient Greece and Rome. Institutions and 
ideas that have shaped Western Civilization. 

HS 325 Europe in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The cultural, political and economic life of Europe from classicism to 
the Napoleonic period; the Enlightenment. 

HS 330 History of Russia 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The development of Czarist Russia from 1200 to the Revolution of 
1917, the U.S.S.R. from 1917 to the present. 

HS 335 Modern European Intellectual Thought 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The intellectual, scientific and social thought from the Enlighten- 
ment to the present. The influence of ideologies on modern thinking. 

HS 351-358 Selected Studies in History 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Special topics in History dealing with the modern world. A study in 
depth of vital historical issues. 

HS 401 Europe in the Twentieth Century 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Recent and contemporary European history beginning with World 
War I. Institutional Development and its changing role in world 
politics. 



89 



HS 406 Modern Japanese History 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The institutional and cultural traditions of Japan. The feudal 
period and subsequent modernization, postwar political, economic 
and cultural transformations. 

HS 407 Colonial and Early Latin America 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The European and Indian origins of Latin America, the indepen- 
dence movement and the post-independence period to 1890. 

HS 408 The History of Modern Latin America 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Latin America since 1890, Inter- American relations and current 
revolutionary movements. 

HS 409 Modern Chinese History 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The ideological, cultural and historical background of China. The 
imperial order, Kuomintang and the Communist revolution to the 
present. 

HS 410 A History of the Middle East 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The rise, spread and development of Islam to the present modern 
nationalisms: Turkish, Iranian, Arab and Zionist. 

HS 413 A History of Africa in Modern Times 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The political and cultural history of North Africa. The colonial 
domination of Sub-Sahara Africa and the emergence of the inde- 
pendent states after 1945. 

HS 415 Historiography 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A survey of European and American historical thought, historical 
methods and contemporary historical writing. 

HS 416 Senior Seminar 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The undertaking of an independent study and research project. 
Recommended for all history majors in their senior year. 

HS 462 The History of the Commercial and Industrial Struc- 
ture of the Soviet Union 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. The pre-1917 background. Problems 
of planning: organizational framework, the implementation of 
Marxism as an economic system. 

90 



HS 463 The Business and Economic History of Modern Asia 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. The historical development of the 
Asian economy in the 19th and 20th centuries, emphasizing the post 
war period. 

HS 464 The Post War Economic and Business Developments 
in Europe 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. Europe in world trade and pay- 
ments, the European economic community, business management 
and the welfare state. 

HS 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a maximum 

of 12. 
Prerequisite: Consent of faculty member and chairman of depart- 
ment. Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty 
member to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be 
initiated by the student. 

Journalism 

Coordinator: Professor Paul Marx, Ph.D., New York University. 

The School of Arts and Sciences offers a minor in journalism. A 
curriculum built around a minor in journalism and a major in 
another arts and sciences area, such as English, history, political 
science, social welfare, or environmental studies will provide an 
excellent undergraduate education for a potential journalist. 

Courses in Journalism 

J 101 Journalism I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A survey of journalism designed to acquaint students with the 
profession. The American newspaper as a social institution and a 
medium of communication. 

J 102 Journalism H 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: J 101. The basic principles of journalism and the 
organizational patterns of the mass media. Some practice in report- 
ing and the writing of news and feature stories. 

91 



J 201 News Writing and Reporting 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: J 101, E 105, E 110. The elements of news, the style 
and the structure of news stories, news gathering methods, 
copjTeading, and editing. Reporting, writing, and editing. 

J 202 Advanced News Writing and Reporting 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: J 201. Intensive practice in news writing and report- 
ing. 

J 311 The Copy Desk 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Intensive practice in copyreading, editing and revising, headline 
writing, photograph selection, page make-up. Regular critiques of 
the copy-desk work of major newspapers. 

J 351 Journalistic Performance 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Students follow the coverage given to selected broad topics in the 
press. They prepare to make judgments of the coverage by doing 
research and becoming knowledgeable about the particular topic 
chosen. The course stresses analytical reading and responsible, 
informed criticism. 

J 367 Interpretive and Editorial Writing 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Practice in the writing of considered and knowledgeable commen- 
taries on current affairs and in the writing of interpretive articles 
based on investigation, research, and interviews. 

J 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 hours per semester. 
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and journalism coor- 
dinator. Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty 
member to explore an area of interest to him. 



Department of Mathematics 

Chairman: Associate Professor Richard M. Stanley, Ph.D., Yale 
University. 

Professors: Joseph Gangler, Ph.D., Columbia University; Ber- 
tram Ross, Ph.D., New York University. 

Associate Professor: Bruce Tyndall, M.S., University of Iowa. 

92 



Assistant Professor: David Naccarato, M.A., Wichita State Uni- 
versity. 

The programs of study in mathematics can provide a student 
with a basis for a career in business, teaching, or research, as well as 
for further studies in graduate school. Because mathematics is 
fundamental to so many fields, a degree in mathematics gives one 
an opportunity to diversify into areas such as engineering, physics, 
statistics, computer science, actuarial science and management 
science. 

A student in mathematics should select electives in mathemat- 
ics so that his course of study has a direction toward pure, applied or 
computer science mathematics. In addition, after consulting with 
his advisor, a mathematics major should choose electives in an area 
of interest outside of mathematics. 

A student not majoring in mathematics is advised to consult his 
own department or the math department about math courses that 
are appropriate to his major. The calculus sequence courses M 115, 
M 117, M 118 and M 203 are basically intended for majors in 
engineering, physical sciences and mathematics. The sequence M 
115 and M 116 is intended for majors in areas such as social science, 
certain biological sciences, management science and forensic sci- 
ence. The courses M 105, M 109, M 121, M 127 and M 228 are 
recommended electives for students in liberal arts, criminal justice, 
business administration or public administration and institutional 
management. 



Requirements for the major 

A major in mathematics must complete the following courses: 
M 117, M 118, M 121, M 203, M 204, M 231, M 321 and M 325. In 
addition the student must complete four 300 level or 400 level 
mathematics courses approved by the mathematics department and 
12 semester hours of natural science or engineering courses selected 
under advisement. 



Requirements for the minor 

A student may minor in mathematics by taking six courses in 
mathematics beyond those usually required in the freshman year of 
his major program. The minor program must be approved by the 
mathematics department and must include M 203 plus at least one 

93 



course from M 121, M 231, M 325 or M 321. The prospective minor in 
mathematics should consult with the mathematics department 
early in his academic career as to the choice and availability of 
courses. 

Courses in Mathematics 

All prerequisites for the following mathematics courses must be 
strictly observed unless waived by permission of the Mathematics 
Department. 

M 001 Mathematics Review I 

No credit. Meets 3 hours per week. 
Required of both day and evening students who do not show suffi- 
cient understanding of mathematics fundamentals, as determined 
by entrance examinations. Natural numbers, integers, rationals 
and irrationals, properties and operations in each, construction and 
solution of mathematical models using simple equations, and per- 
centages. 

M 105 Introductory College Mathematics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Introductory college mathematics for the liberal arts student that 
includes a variety of mathematical ideas chosen to illustrate the 
nature and importance of mathematics in human culture. An induc- 
tive approach based on experimentation and discovery. 

M 109 Elementary College Algebra 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A review of the fundamental operations and an extensive study of 
functions, exponents, radicals, linear and quadratic equations. Ad- 
ditional topics include ratio, proportion, variation, progressions and 
the binomial theorem. 

M 115 Pre-Calculus Mathematics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 109. Designed to offer the foundation needed for the 
study of calculus. Polynomials, algebraic functions, elementary 
point geometry, plane anal5^ic trigonometry and properties of ex- 
ponential functions. 

M 116 Survey of Calculus 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 115. An intuitive approach to topics in functions, 
analytic geometry, differential and integral calculus and probabil- 

94 



ity. Designed for an insight into, and appreciation of, the methods of 
analysis. 

M 117 Calculus I 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 115. The first-year college course for majors in 
mathematics, science and engineering; and the basic prerequisite 
for all advanced mathematics. Introduces differential and integral 
calculus of functions of one variable, along with plane analytic 
geometry. 

M 118 Calculus II 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 117. Continuation of first-year calculus, including 
methods of integration, the fundamental integration theorem, dif- 
ferentiation and integration of transcendental functions and varied 
applications. 

M 121 Algebraic Structures I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A first course in and an orientation to abstract mathematics: 
elementary logic, sets, mappings, relations, operations, elementary 
group theory. Open to all freshmen and sophomores. 

M 122 Algebraic Structures II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 121. A continuation of M 121 including an introduc- 
tion to groups, rings, fields, and the real and complex number 
systems. 

M 127 Finite Mathematics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Basic discrete functions with numerous applications in the social 
sciences, elementary finite differences; topics from probability, 
matrices, and introduction to linear programming. 

M 137 Calculus Topics 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Departmental permission. The theoretical material of 
the standard first year of calculus, including limits, chain rules, 
mean value theorems and a discussion of the fundamental theorem 
of integral calculus. Upon successful completion, the student is 
qualified for M 203. 

M203 Calculus III 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 118. The calculus of multiple variables, covering 
third dimensional topics in analjrtics, linear algebra, and vector 

95 



analysis, plus partial differentiation, multiple integration, infinite 
series and indeterminate forms. 

M 204 Differential Equations 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 203. The solution of ordinary differential equations, 
including the use of Laplace transforms. Existence of solutions, 
series solutions, matrix methods, non-linear equations and varied 
applications. 

M 228 Elementary Statistics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: One previous course in college mathematics. In- 
cludes basic probability theory, random variables and their dis- 
tributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, regression and corre- 
lation. Will emphasize an applied approach to statistical theory 
with applications chosen from many different fields of study. 

M 231 Linear Algebra 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 203. Linear spaces and systems, matrices, linear 
transformations, quadratic forms, eigenspaces and other topics. 

M 301 Linear Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 204 and M 231. Linear vector spaces, infinite 
series, transformations, generalized Fourier series, solutions of par- 
tial differential equations. 

M 303 Advanced Calculus I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 204. A survey course in applied mathematics. Vec- 
tor Calculus: line and surface integrals, integral theorems of Green 
and Stokes, and the divergence theorem. Complex variables: 
elementary functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, integration, 
Cauchy integral theorem, infinite series, calculus of residues and 
conformal mapping. An introduction to Cartesian tensors. 

M 304 Advanced Calculus II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 204. Topics from applied mathematics include: 
Fourier series, orthogonal functions, Bessel functions, Legendre 
polynomials, Laplace and Fourier transforms, product solutions of 
partial differential equations and boundary value problems. 

96 



M 309 Advanced Differential Equations 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 204. Theoretical analysis and applications of non- 
linear differential equations. Phase plane and space, perturbation 
theory and techniques, series and related methods, stability theory 
and techniques and relaxation phenomena. 

M 321 Modern Algebra I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 121 and M 231. Groups, rings, integral domains, 
fields, polynomials. 

M 325 Number Theory 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 121. Topics are selected fi*om the following: 
mathematical induction, Euclidean algorithm, integers, number 
theoretic functions, Euler-Fermat theorems, congruence, quadratic 
residues and Peano axioms. 

M 338-339 Numerical Analysis I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 204 and IE 102. Approximation and error evalua- 
tion. Finite differences approximation by polynomial and ortho- 
gonal series, solutions of ordinary differential equations, solutions 
of elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations, 
interpolation and basic integral equation solutions. 

M 341 Sets and Ordered Structures 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 121. Axiomatic set theory based on the Zermelo- 
Fraenkel theory, algebra of sets, relations and functions, finite and 
infinite sets, order, axiom of choice and its equivalents. 

M 343 Projective Geometry 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 121 and M 231. Projective transformations, fixed 
points, invariants, cross-ratio, conies, Euclidean and non-Euclidean 
geometries. 

M 345 Tensor Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 204 and M 231. The properties of vectors and 
tensors in Cartesian and in general curvilinear coordinate systems. 
Topics covered include: invariance properties, transformation laws, 
calculus of tensors, covariant differentiation, surface theory. Appli- 
cations are considered in areas such as rigid body d)niamics, elastic- 
ity, fiuid mechanics, electricity and magnetism and geometry. 

97 



M 371 Probability Theory 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 203. Axiomatic study of probabihty: sample spaces, 
combinatorial analysis, independence and dependence, random 
variables, distribution functions, moment generating functions, 
central limit theorem. 

M 381 Real Analysis I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 121 and M 203. Foundations of analysis, sets and 
functions, real and complex number systems; limits, convergence 
and continuity, sequences and infinite series, differentiation. 

M 412 Real Analysis II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 381. Continuation of M 381 including Riemann- 
Stieltjes integration theory and an introduction to measure theory 
and the Lebesgue integral. 

M 422 Modern Algebra II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 321. Continuation of M 321 including topics such 
as: vector spaces, modules, commutative ring theory, Galois theory. 

M 423 Complex Variables 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 381. For mathematics, science, and engineering 
students. Review of elementary functions and Euler forms; 
holomorphic functions, Laurent series, singularities, calculus of 
residues, contour integration, maximum modulus theorem, bilinear 
and inverse transformations, conformal mapping, and analytic con- 
tinuation. 

M441 Topology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 381. Topics selected from the following: Hausdorff 
neighborhood relations, derived, open and closed sets, closure, to- 
pological space, bases, homeomorphisms, relative topology, product 
spaces, separation axioms, metric spaces, connectedness and com- 
pactness. 

M 472 Mathematical Statistics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 371. Elements of the theory of point estimation, 
maximum likelihood estimates, theory of testing hypotheses, power 
of a test, confidence, intervals, linear regression, experimental de- 

98 



sign and analysis of variance, correlation, and non-parametric 
tests. 

M 491 Departmental Seminar 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Independent study of some topic or topics approved by the chairman 
of the department. This work is done under the supervision of a 
faculty member. A paper and/or a seminar talk may be required, 

M 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a maximum of 

12. 
Prerequisite: Consent of faculty member and chairman of depart- 
ment. Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty 
member to explore an area of interest. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 

Department of World Music 

Chairman: Associate Professor Ralf E. Carriuolo, Ph.D., Wesleyan 
University. 

The program in world music is unique. Music is studied as a 
world-wide phenomenon, not simply as defined in the Western 
European art tradition. The student is encouraged to view music as 
a creation of all cultures and civilizations on both the folk and art 
levels, including our own urban and ethnic subcultures. Exposure to 
various musics should lead the student to specialization in a par- 
ticular area as an upperclassman. 

Since music is a performing art, the student is expected to reach 
a satisfactory level of proficiency in either a traditional western 
instrument or one central to the particular culture in which he 
chooses to specialize. 



Requirements for the major 

Eighteen credits from among MU 112, MU 150-1, MU 198-9, 
MU 201-2, MU 251-2, and fifteen credits in upper level courses, MU 
299 and above, which must include MU 416. At least three credits 
must be earned in MU 116. 

Although the program contains no language requirement, stu- 
dents are urged to acquaint themselves with the language of their 
areas of concentration. 

99 



Requirements for the minor 

Fifteen hours in music courses other than performance are 
required for the minor. Consult with a member of the music faculty. 



Courses in World Music 

MU 106 Chorus 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours. 
Styles of group singing, survey of choral music literature from 
around the world. Also available as an extra-curricular activity. 

MU 111 Introduction to Music 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Beisic forms and styles of music in the Western World. Music ap- 
preciation. 

MU 112 Introduction to World Music 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Non- Western musical styles, their cultures and aesthetics; music of 
the indigenous cultures of the Americas and the advanced musics of 
the Near East and Far East; emphasis on India, the Orient, South- 
east Asia, Africa and Indonesia. 

MU 116 Performance 

Credit, 1-8 semester hours; maximum 3 credit hours per 

semester. 
Open to all students interested in ensembles or private instruction. 
Students with adequate scholastic standing may carry this course 
for credit in addition to a normal program. 

MU 150-151 Introduction to Music Theory 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Fundamentals of music: notation, physical and acoustical founda- 
tions, harmony and melody, modality, tonality, atonality; conso- 
nance and dissonance, tension; introductory composition, and ear 
training. 

MU 198-199 Introduction to American Music 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Music of the North American continent from the Puritans to the 
present day; both European and non-European musical traditions, 
with emphasis on 20th century developments. 

100 



MU 201-202 Analysis and History of European Art Music 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
The growth of Western art music from its beginnings to the present 
day. Analysis of musical masterpieces on a technical and conceptual 
basis. 

MU 250-251 Theory and Composition 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Investigation of music theory in various parts of the world, includ- 
ing the Western Art Tradition. Exercises in the composition of 
music within these theoretical constructs. Ear training and 
keyboard harmony. 

MU 299 Problems of Music 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Music as an art form throughout the world. Music aesthetics and its 
relationship to the performing and composing of music. 

MU 300 Studies in Music I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Area studies in music and its parent culture. Cultural theory as 
related to the music; instruments of the area £ind their etymologies; 
performance practices; the social role of music, both art and folk. 
Areas offered depend on availability of staff: China, Japan, the Near 
East, the Indian sub-continent, Africa, American Indian, Afro- 
American, Latin America, the Anglo-Celtic tradition, and others. 

MU 350 Studies in Music 11 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Area studies in musical forms: their history, evolution, and resul- 
tant metamorphoses, performance practices, and present day forms 
extant. Areas offered depend upon availability of staff. 

MU 416 Advanced Performance 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the department staff and a faculty ad- 
visor. Preparation and presentation of an instrumental or vocal 
performance indicating sufficient proficiency to warrant the award- 
ing of a degree in world music. 

MU 500 Seminar in Advanced Research 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Bibliographical studies 
of major world music areas; investigation of current and historical 
musicological theories, analysis and criticism of musicological area 
literatures. 

101 



MU 550 Studies in Urban Ethnic Music 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. The music tradition of 
inner city ethnic groups; emphasis on the operation of the oral 
tradition in the preservation of cultural values and customs as 
evidenced through music. Classroom discussion will be balanced by 
field research in the urban vicinity. 

MU 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a maximum 

of 12. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 



Department of Physics 



Chairman: Professor Kee W. Chun, Ph.D., University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 
Professor: Richard C. Morrison, Ph.D., Yale University. 

Physics is concerned with the most basic aspects of our knowl- 
edge of the natural world. It is a subject in which experiment and 
theory evolve constantly to provide a precise and simple description 
of the physical phenomena around us in terms of a relatively small 
number of physical laws and theories. 

As the most fundamental science, physics is at the root of 
almost all branches of science and technology. It has provided the 
microscopic basis for chemistry, has stimulated important de- 
velopments in mathematics, is the basis of most branches of en- 
gineering, and during the past decade has proved to be increasingly 
valuable to the life sciences. 

Consequently, a basic knowledge of physics is excellent prep- 
aration for diverse careers: research in university and government 
laboratories; industrial research and development; applied science 
and engineering; biological and medical sciences; research in en- 
vironmental problems; and teaching at all levels from the elemen- 
tary school to the university. It also prepares students for C£ireers in 
non-physics related fields such as philosophy, business and law. 

The department offers B.A. and B.S. degrees in physics. Degree 
requirements are kept flexible to allow each physics major to tailor 
a program suited to his own career interests. The department 
strives to provide a well-balanced four-year program emphasizing 

102 



both the theoretical and the experimental in the broad areas of 
classical and modem physics. 

The University of New Haven has a chapter of the Society of 
Physics Students (SPS), a nationally recognized society operated 
within the Education Division of the American Institute of Physics. 
Its membership is open to anyone interested in physics. The society 
provides each student with an opportunity to participate in the 
physics community through regional and national meetings. Mem- 
bers of SPS receive a monthly journal, Physics Today, and SPS 
Newsletters. 



Requirements for the major 

The physics major (B.A. and B.S.) must complete the following 
department requirements: Physics 150, 205, 211, 301, 351, 373, 404, 
415 (or 401, 406), and 12 semester hours of physics electives; 
Mathematics 117, 118, 203, 204, and six semester hours of 
mathematics electives; and Chemistry 105, 106. Candidates for a 
Bachelor of Science degree in physics must complete the additional 
nine semester hours of restricted electives chosen from physical 
science, engineering and mathematics. The balance of the program 
will be worked out in consultation with an advisor. 



Requirements for the minor 

A total of 18 semester hours of physics is required for the 
physics minor. 



Courses in Physics 

PH 100 Introductory Physics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Primarily for liberal arts and business students interested in a 
broad, non-mathematical understanding of physics. Emphasis on 
the basic concepts of physics, their application to our everyday 
environment and their impact on society. 

103 



PH 101 Energy-Present and Future 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Intended primarily for business and liberal arts students. Explores 
the nature, role, and economic impact of energy in our society. 
Topics include: the nature and growth of energy consumption, 
physical limits to energy production and consumption, environ- 
mental effects, and comparisons of energy alternatives. Special em- 
phasis on the technical, environmental and economic aspects of 
nuclegu- power as well as energy sources of the future such as fast 
breeder reactors, fusion, solar and geothermal power. 

PH 103-104 General Physics I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Primarily for life science majors with no calculus background. Basic 
concepts of classical physics: fundamental laws of mechanics, heat, 
electromagnetism, optics, and conservation principles. Introduction 
to modern physics; relativity and quantum theory, atomic, nuclear 
and solid state physics. Application of physical principles to life 
sciences. 

PH 105-106 General Physics Laboratory I and II 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Should be taken concurrently with PH 103-104. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 

PH 130 Radiation Safety 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Intended for students in occupational safety and hygiene, fire sci- 
ence, forensic science and related fields, as well as science and 
engineering students with interests in this area. Topics include: the 
nature of radiation and radioactivity, the interaction of radiation 
with matter, biological effects of radiation, detection and measure- 
ment of radiation, shielding considerations, dosimetry and stan- 
dards for personal protection. 

PH 140 Radioactivity Laboratory Technique 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: One semester of laboratory science. Provides a practi- 
cal working knowledge of radioactive techniques to students in any 
branch of science, engineering or forensics, or to anyone wishing 
knowledge of the role of nuclear technology today. Experiments 
may be completed in biology, chemistry, engineering, forensics or 
physics, according to the interest of the student. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

104 



PH 150 Mechanics, Heat, and Waves W/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 117 or instructor's consent (M 117 may be taken 
concurrently). Introductory course for physical science and en- 
gineering majors. Kinematics, Newton's laws, conservation princi- 
ples for momentum, energy and angular momentum. Thermal 
physics. Basic propjerties of waves, simple harmonic motion, super- 
position principle, interference phenomena and sound. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics W/Lab 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: PH 150 and M 118 (M 118 may be taken concur- 
rently). Basic concepts of electricity and magnetism; Coulomb's law, 
electric field and potential, Gauss's law. Ohm's law, KirchofTs rules, 
capacitance, magnetic field. Ampere's law, Faraday's law of induc- 
tion, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves. Fundamentals 
of optics; light, laws of reflection and refraction, interference and 
diffraction phenomenas, polarization, gratings, lenses and optical 
instruments. Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

PH 211 Modern Physics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PH 205 or PH 104. Modern physics fundamentals. 
Twentieth-century developments in the theory of relativity and the 
quantum theory. Atomic, nuclear, solid state and elementary parti- 
cle physics. 

PH 270 Thermal Physics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PH 150 or PH 103. Laws of thermodjniamics, en- 
tropy, applications to physical, chemical systems and thermal 
machines; elementary kinetic theory of gases; basic concepts of 
classical and quantum statistics. 

PH 280 Lasers 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PH 205 or PH 104. Laser theory, holography, con- 
struction and application to latest engineering and scientific uses. 

PH 285 Modern Optics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: PH 205 and PH 104. Introduction to the optical 
theories. Topics on the latest developments in optics. Application to 
life sciences and engineering. 

105 



PH 301 Analytical Mechanics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 204 and PH 150, or instructor's consent. Inter- 
mediate anal)^ical mechanics. Statics and d)niamics of particles 
and rigid bodies. Emphasis on the theory of motion under central 
forces and on the use of the generalized coordinates; introduction to 
an elementary Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalism; small vi- 
brations. 

PH 351 Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: PH 205 and M 204. Electric field and potential using 
vector field formalism. Boundary conditions. Poisson's and La- 
place's equations. Electromagnetic fields in cavities and 
waveguides. Electromagnetic waves. 

PH 373 Advanced Laboratory 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PH 211. Selected experiments in atomic and nucle£ir 
physics. Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

PH 400 Statistical Mechanics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. An introductory course in classi- 
cal and quantum statistical mechanics. The canonical ensemble; 
Maxwell- Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac statistics and 
their applications; statistical interpretation of thermod5niamics; 
transport processes. 

PH 401 Atomic Physics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PH 211. Structure and interactions of atomic systems 
including Schrodinger's equation, atomic bonding, scattering and 
mean free path, radiative transitions and laser theory. 

PH 404 Senior Project 

Credit, 1-6 semester hours. 
Open to senior physics majors. Individual projects in experimental 
or theoretical physics to be carried out under direct supervision of a 
faculty advisor. 

PH 406 SoUd State Physics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PH 211. Introduction to the physics of solids with 
emphasis on crystal structure, lattice vibrations, band theory, 
semiconductor, magnetism and super-conductivity. Applications to 
semiconductor devices and metallurgy. 

106 



PH 415 Nuclear Physics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PH 211 or instructor's consent. Elementary nuclear 
physics. Nuclear structure, natural radioactivity, induced radioac- 
tivity, nuclear forces, and reactions, fission and fusion, reactors and 
topics of special interest. 

PH 451 Elementary Quantum Mechanics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PH 211 or instructor's consent. An elementary treat- 
ment of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. Schrodinger's equa- 
tion with its applications to atomic and nuclear structure; collision 
theory; radiation; introductory perturbation theory. 

PH 470 Theory of Relativity 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PH 211 or instructor's consent. Introduction to Ein- 
stein's theory of relativity. Special theory of relativity; Lorentz 
transformations, relativistic mechanics and electromagnetism. 
General theory of relativity; equivalence principle, Einstein's three 
tests, Graviton, black hole and cosmology. 

PH 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a maximum 

of 12. 
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of depart- 
ment. Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty 
member to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be 
initiated by the student. 



Occupational Safety and Hygiene 

Coordinator: Professor Douglas Robillard, Ph. D., Wayne State 
University. 

With the passage of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 
1970, new and more stringent requirements for safety are now in 
effect, and a high degree of professionalism in the job of safety 
manager is required. 

The demands placed upon the safety professional require a 
broad background in physics, chemistry, engineering, psychology 
and biology. The program is an interdisciplinary one that draws 
upon the resources of the schools of engineering, arts and sciences 

107 



and business. In addition to required courses, there is a diversified 
offering of restricted electives with a proper balance of flexibility 
meant to meet the needs and interests of individual students. 

The OSHA law applies to all employers, and consequently the 
demand for professionally competent people includes industry, re- 
tailing services, hospitals, construction, communication and gov- 
ernment at all levels. In addition, there is a demand by labor unions, 
by state governments and the federal government for endorsement 
administrators of this act. 

Students may earn a certificate by completing a certain 
number of courses in the program. The Associate in Science degree 
and the Bachelor of Science degree are also awarded in the program. 

Prospective students are encouraged to consult with the coor- 
dinator to determine credits and requirements. 



Department of Philosophy 

Chairman: Professor John CoUison, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. 

Philosophy courses will assist a student in any major to under- 
stand himself and the world around him and to see his area of 
interest in a broader perspective. A major in philosophy will help 
the student integrate a liberal arts education through systematic 
study of the basic problems of knowledge, language, and reality. 



Requirements for the major 

A program planned with a member of the department to meet 
the particular needs of the student consists of thirty hours. All need 
not be in courses offered by the Philosophy Department. Since the 
major is flexible, the student has an opportunity to vary his program 
and to incorporate philosophy into a double msgor. 



Requirements for the minor 

A planned program of 15 hours approved by a member of the 
department is required for the minor. 

108 



Courses in Philosophy 

PL 111 Introduction to Problems of Philosophy 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Man's place in the universe, how we discover truth, the nature of 
beauty and the good, the basis of moral choices. 

PL 113 History of Philosophy through the Renaissance 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Chronological introduction to problems of philosophy. Pre- 
Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Medieval and Renaissance philosophers. 
May be substituted for PL 111. 

PL 114 History of Modern Philosophy 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Chronological introduction to problems of philosophy. Seventeenth 
Century to the present, including Descartes, Hume, Hegel, 
Nietzsche, and contemporary philosophers. May be substituted for 
PL 111. 

PL 124 Logic and Scientific Method 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Introduces the student to deduction, warranted induction, and sci- 
entific description. May be substituted for PL 111. 

PL 213-214 Contemporary Issues in Philosophy 

Credit, 3-6 semester hours. 
Current philosophical thinking in such areas as natural science, 
social science, metaphysics, religion, aesthetics, theory of knowl- 
edge, language, existentialism, ethics and positivism. 

PL 222 Ethics in a Changing Society 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The major ethical systems in the framework of contemporary soci- 
ety. Ethical norms which point to goals of life and their relation to 
the issues in science, business, the professions and other human 
activities. 

PL 225 Sjrmbolic Logic 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PL 124 or M 121. Formal deductive systems, including 
the propositional calculus, the calculus of functions, independence 
of axioms, primitive symbols, interpretation, paradoxes, theory of 
types, Goedel's theorem. 

109 



PL 240 Philosophy of Science 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A study of the nature of scientific method, the logic of scientific 
explanation and theory construction, philosophical problems of 
selected sciences, questions peculiar to the social sciences. 

PL 250 Philosophy of Religion 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of philosophy. An examination of 
some philosophical notions used in religious discourse; meaning, 
truth, fact, being, logic. 

PL 252 Existentialism 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
From its origin in the 19th century to contemporary manifestations. 
Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Kafka, Sartre, R.D. Laing and 
others. 

PL 260 Development of Jewish Thought I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Jewish thinking and philosophy during the ancient and medieval 
periods. The Patriarchal period, early religion and law, the 
Prophets, the Hellenistic period, Talmudic Judaism, the Kabbalah 
and Medieval Judaism. 

PL 261 Development of Jewish Thought II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Modern and contemporary Jewish thinking and philosophy. Jewish 
mysticism, the pseudo-messianic movements, the Hassidic move- 
ment, the Reform movement and Zionism. 

PL 322 Analysis and Criticism of the Arts 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of philosophy. The language used to 
talk about works of art. Form, content, expression, values, the 
ontological status of the art object. 

PL 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a maximum 

of 12. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 



110 



Department of Political Science 

Chairman: Professor Caroline A. Dinegar, Ph.D., Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Assistant Professors: James Dull, M.A., University of Pennsyl- 
vania; Robert D. Harrison, J.D., Yale University; Joshua H. 
Sandman, M.A., New York University. 

A political science major provides the student with an excellent 
foundation for a career in government service on the local, state, 
national, and international levels; for a career in law; for graduate 
school programs in political science, international relations and 
foreign affairs; and for careers in campaign management, com- 
munications, public relations and business. All political science and 
pre-law political science majors or minors should discuss career 
goals and program orientation with a departmental advisor at an 
early stage in order to select relevant courses in a total program. 

Potential law students and graduate school students (in all 
disciplines) are urged to take the special LSAT and GRE prepara- 
tion courses which are available through the Political Science De- 
partment and the Division of Special Studies. 



Requirements for the major 

A political science major is required to take a total of 36 semes- 
ter hours in the Political Science Department, which must include 
PS 121, 122, 261, 461, 462, and 499 or 500. All political science 
students should take PA 301, Principles of Public Administration 
and Statistics (M 128 or P 301) as electives. In addition, pre-law 
political science majors are encouraged to take Introductory Ac- 
counting I, A 111, and/or Human Communications I, CO 103. 



Requirements for the minor 

A student may minor in the Department of Political Science by 
completing PS 121, PS 122 and four other political science courses 
which should be chosen in conjuction with a departmental advisor 
and should be related to the student's area of interest and concent- 
ration. 

Ill 



The Institute of Law and Public Affairs 

The Institute of Law and Public Affairs has been estabhshed to 
provide undergraduates with specific training in the areas of para- 
legal and public affairs. Students with an undergraduate major in 
any of the schools of the university can attain para-professional 
status in legal affairs or public affairs by completing a minor in the 
institute. The term "para-professional" applies to those with special 
training in a professional field but who do not yet possess the 
terminal degree normally required in the profession. In many in- 
stances the para-professional status is a step towards the ac- 
complishment of the final degree. 



Legal Atfairs 

The field of legal affairs prepares students for positions as office 
managers, administrative assistants, legal investigators, data re- 
searchers, legal library assistants and legislative researchers in 
private and public law firms and agencies. Students acquire specific 
skills which will enable them to do important legal work under the 
supervision of practicing attorneys. The legal affairs minor also 
prepares students for positions in the judicial system, and for re- 
search positions and clerkships in the law libraries of the state. 



Public Affairs 

The public affairs minor in the Institute of Law and Public 
Affairs is directed towards providing training for civil service posi- 
tions at the governmental level. The goal of such training is to 
provide more effective public administrators and to introduce 
creativity into the profession of public service. The public affairs 
minor will take a problem solving approach to the discipline as 
students will be conducting basic in-depth research on problems of 
governmental agencies. Students in this minor will be able to de- 
velop valuable insights into the nature of the public process from 
the vantage point of the bureaucracy. 



112 



Courses in Political Science 

PS 121 American Grovernment and Politics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
American political culture and behavior; Constitutional 
framework; Congress and the Presidency; federal judicial system; 
individual liberties, governmental structure; public opinion; politi- 
cal parties; interest groups. 

PS 122 State and Local Government and Politics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Problems of cities, revenue sharing, community power structures, 
welfare, public safety, the state political party, big-city political 
machines, interest groups, state legislatures, the governor, the 
mayor, courts and judicial reform. 

PS 201-202 Women and the Political Process 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The impact of women on the economic, social and political process; 
problems of integration and equalitarianism. 

PS 203 American Political Thought 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Pre-revolutionary and revolutionary political thought; classical 
conservatism, liberalism, Jacksonian democracy, civil disobedi- 
ence, social Darwinism, progressive individualism, pluralism and 
contemporary protest movements. 

PS 216 Urban Government and Politics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Organizational and administrative government at the municipal 
level; special emphasis upon the problems of modern urban America 
in relation to social and political development. 

PS 222 United States Foreign Policy 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Quantitative and qualitative examination of the foreign policy pro- 
cess; strategy and tactics of a super power in the twentieth century 
and the determinants of foreign and military policy. 

PS 232 The Politics of the First Amendment 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PS 121. Examination of the political implications of 
First Amendment freedoms (speech, press, religion); Supreme 
Court's adaptation of the First Amendment to changing political 
and social conditions. 

113 



PS 241 International Relations 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Forces and structures operating in the modern nation state system; 
the foreign pohcy process; decision-making process; the impact of 
decolonization on traditional interstate behavior; economic and 
political developments since World War II. 

PS 243 International Law and Organization 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PS 241. Traditional and modern approach to interna- 
tional law and organization; major emphasis on the contribution of 
law and organization to the establishment of a world rule of law and 
world peace. The League of Nations system and the United Nations 
system are analyzed. 

PS 261 Modern Political Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Introduction to the new approach of political analysis; personality 
and politics; political socialization; role and group theory; decision 
making; systems analysis and political violence. 

PS 264 Political Development of the Third World 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Political climate of new states; problems of political unity and 
national integration, regionalism, nationalism, imperialism; polit- 
ical structures, problems of leadership and decision-making. 

PS 281 Comparative Political Systems: East Asia 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Traditional, modern political and social structures of China, Japan 
and Korea and the functioning of the political system within each 
country. 

PS 282 Comparative Political Systems: Europe 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Political characteristics of modern European states. Emphasis on 
political, social and economic institutions, structures, the impact of 
modern European developments on integration. France, Germany, 
United Kingdom, USSR, Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, Sweden and 
Switzerland. 

PS 283 Comparative Political Systems: Latin America 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Political modernization, development in Latin America, political 
institutions, national identity, leadership, integration, political 
socialization and political ideologies. 

114 



PS 284 Comparative Political Systems: Africa 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Colonial background; constitutional framework. Political institu- 
tions and governmental structures of African states. Nigeria, 
Kenya, Uganda and South Africa. 

PS 285 Comparative Political Systems: Middle East 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Colonial background, legal framework of nationhood; political, so- 
cial and economic structures of development. Turkey, Egypt, Leba- 
non, S3rria, Jordan, Iraq and Iran. 

PS 304 Political Parties 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PS 121. Voting and electoral behavior; pressure 
groups; political party structure and functions of the party system 
in the American political community. 

PS 308 The Legislative Process 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PS 121. Legislative process in the American political 
system; legislative functions; selection and recruitment of candi- 
dates; legislative leadership, the committee system; lobbyists; 
decision-making; legislative norms, folkways and legislative- 
executive relations. 

PS 309 The American Presidency 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The role of the President as Commander in Chief, legislative leader, 
party leader, administrator, manager of the economy, director of 
foreign policy, and advocate of social justice; nature of presidential 
decision making, authority, power, influence and personality. 

PS 331 Political Theory and the Supreme Court 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Writings of prominent judicial theorists and political scientists on 
Supreme Court judicial decision-making; the political impact of the 
Supreme Court; the judge as politician; implementation of judicial 
decisions in the political arena; current cases before the Supreme 
Court utilized. 

PS 332 Constitutional Law 

Credit, 3 semester houj-s. 
Prerequisite: PS 121. Principles and concepts of the United States 
Constitution as revealed in leading decisions of the Supreme Court 
and the process of judicial review. 

115 



PS 390 Political Modernization 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Comparative analysis of political change and development; in- 
cludes the process of political transition, political integration and 
nation-building; institutional developments; political parties; 
military elites, youth, intellectuals, the bureaucracy, economic de- 
velopment and political culture. 

PS 422 State and Local Legislative Politics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A mock legislative assembly running concurrently with the Con- 
necticut State Assembly and dealing with the same issues. This 
legislature will hold committee meetings, public hearings, plenary 
sessions and press coverage using campus media. 

PS 461 Political Theory: Ancient and Medieval 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: HS 111. Foundations of Western political thought, 
Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, 
Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill and Burke. An attempt will be made 
to apply the political thought of these thinkers to contemporary 
political questions. 

PS 462 Political Theory: Modern and Contemporary 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: HS 112. Modern and contemporary political 
ideologies. Major characteristics of ideology, the psychological and 
sociological functions of ideology, nationalism, the nature of to- 
talitarianism, fascism, Nsizism, Marxian theory, communism and 
democratic theory. 

PS 494-498 Studies in Political Science 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Studies in Political Science is intended to cover a variety of current 
problems and specialized areas in the field not available in the 
regular curriculum. 

PS 499-500 Senior Seminar in Political Science 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the department chairman. Construc- 
tion and preparation of an individual research project in political 
science by the student and the presentation of that project in oral 
form within the seminar and in written form as the seminar thesis. 
Required of all political science majors. 

116 



PS 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Directed research on special topics to be decided upon in consulta- 
tion with the chairman of the department. 

Institute of Law and Public Affairs 

Coordinator: Assistant Professor, Robert Harrison, J.D., Yale 
University, 

Political science majors may not take institute courses for polit- 
ical science elective credit with the exception of PS 230 and PS 231. 
Other exceptions may be granted by the director. Institute courses 
may, however, be taken for general elective credit. 

PS 224 Public Attitudes and Public Policy 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A study of the sources of mass political attitudes and behavior and 
their effect on public policy. The course will examine the techniques 
for influencing opinions including propaganda and mass media 
communications . 

PS 225 Political Communications 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The dynamics of preparing effective public messages. The theory 
and application of social science techniques to political persuasion: 
talks to win attention, secure action and overcome prejudice. Other 
topics to be considered are the choice, arrangement and adaptation 
of materials; audience analysis and motivation. 

PS 226 Family Law 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A study of legal relations between husband and wife including 
marriage, annulment, divorce, alimony, separation, adoption, cus- 
tody agreements and basic procedures of family law litigation. 

PS 228 Legal and Public Interest Groups 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
This course will examine, through readings and field trips, various 
institutions in the legal culture. Emphasis on the purpose and 
function of each organization and on vocational opportunities. 
Among the institutions to be studied are the private and public 
interest law firm, administrative agencies, the New Haven Leg£il 
Assistance Corporation, the Public Defender's Office, the state and 
local legislatures and state and federal courts. 

117 



PS 229 Legal Communications 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
This course seeks to familiarize students with the kinds of legal 
documents and written instruments employed by participants in 
the legal process. Students will learn to recognize and understand 
the purpose of writs, complaints, briefs, memoranda, contracts, 
wills and motions. 

PS 230 Anglo-American Jurisprudence 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
This course will survey ideas about the nature of law. Among the 
legal philosophers examined will be Plato, Aristotle, St. Thomas 
Aquinas, John Austin, William Blackstone, Benjamin Cardozo, L. 
A. Hart and Oliver Wendell Holmes. The contribution to legal 
theory made by various schools of jurisprudence (e.g., positivism, 
legal realism) will also be examined. 

PS 231 Judicial Behavior 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Examination of the American court system as a political policy- 
making body. Topics considered include: the structure of the judicial 
system, the influence of sociological and psychological factors on 
judicial behavior and the nature and impact of the judicial 
decision-making process. 

PS 238 Legal Procedure I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
This course is designed to provide a practical knowledge of civil 
procedure for the pre-law and paralegal student. The student will 
follow the complete course of a lawsuit, comparing the procedural 
rules of Connecticut with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. 
Taught from the point of view of a practicing lawyer, pleadings, 
motions and legal definitions will be introduced and examined for 
their practical effect in the conduct of the lawsuit. 

PS 239 Legal Procedure II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The course will examine administrative procedure, following a case 
through an administrative hearing and then through the appeal 
process. The course is designed to enable pre-law and paralegal 
students to understand the informal and non-technical aspects of 
administrative procedure. Procedure II will continue the emphasis 
that Procedure I introduced to deal with processes from a practical 
and problem-solving viewpoint. 

118 



PS 240 Legal Bibliography and Resources 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An introduction to legal bibliographical materials. Students will 
learn how to use various kinds of law books in solving research 
problems incident to advising clients and trying and appealing 
cases. The function of court reports, statutes, codes, digests, citators, 
loose-leaf services and treatises will be discussed. 

PS 315 Political Bureaucracy 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
This course will examine the nature and function of governmental 
bureaucratic organizations with particular emphasis on the deci- 
sion making process. Attention will be paid to the sources and 
consequences of increasing bureaucratization on the ability to gov- 
ern. 

PS 326 Real Estate Law 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Course will provide a variety of legal skills in real estate law. 
Special attention will be given to title work, mortgage, deeds, 
leases, property taxes, closing procedures and documents. 

PS 328 Legal Management and Administrative Skills 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An examination of the procedures and systems necessary to run a 
law office efficiently. Students will learn such administrative skills 
as how to interview clients, conduct legal correspondence and main- 
tain legal records. Proven management techniques for keeping 
track of filing dates and fees, court dockets and calendars will also 
be examined. 

PS 329 Legal Library Skills 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A systematic appraisal of the duties, responsibilities and skills 
required of paraprofessionals employed in law libraries. 

PS 330 Legal Investigation 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Examines skills needed to conduct investigations that are a routine 
part of the practice of law, how to search a title and how to trace 
patent rights. Principles of fact-gathering in a wide range of cases 
(e.g., criminal, divorce, custody, housing) will also be explored. 

119 



PS 406 Public Affairs Research 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Students prepare recommendations on policy problems presented to 
the institute by governmental bodies on the municipal, state and 
federal level or private groups. 

PS 415 Internship in Public Affairs 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Students will be assigned to a specific governmental agency and 
will have the opportunity to work in the field on current problems of 
public administration. 

PS 430 Computers and the Law 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An analysis of the ways in which the advent of the computer has 
affected law and the legal profession. Students will explore methods 
of using computers for legal research, the effects of computers on 
criminology and the administration of justice, the impact of mass 
data banks on the right to privacy and freedom of choice. 

PS 440 Legal Research 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The purpose of this course is to give the student practical experience 
in researching and writing on realistic legal problems. Specific 
written assignments will require students to make use of all the 
library tools. Students will learn how to prepare and analyze legal 
memoranda and briefs. 



Department of Psychology 

Chairman: Professor Dennis M. Courtney, Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

Professor: David Brown, M.A., Columbia University. 

Associate Professors: Robert J. Hoffnung, Ph.D., University of 
Cincinnati; Arnold Hyman, Ph.D., University of Cincinnati; 
Thomas L. Mentzer, Ph.D., Brown University; David Paelet, 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut. 

Psychology faces the questions that are of most immediate 
concern to the individual: problems such as personal identity, the 
social context, normalcy versus deviance and behavior change. As a 
science, psychology is devoted to the understanding, prediction and 
control of behavior. 

120 



Our dedication to these goals requires that we study behavior 
from a number of viewpoints — development, learning, social, 
physiological, abnormal, personality — each fascinating in its own 
right. The student's attention is also drawn to the many settings in 
which behavior occurs, from the family to the laboratory, from the 
clinic to the marketplace. This great diversity ensures that the 
study of psychology will interrelate meaningfully with other 
courses in the humanities and sciences. 

The undergraduate program in the Department of Psychology 
combines basic science and applications to prepare students for 
further professional training in psychology or for careers in the 
health professions, law, business, education and human services 
delivery. Study in psychology is frequently combined with work in 
other programs at the University of New Haven, particularly those 
in sociology, political science, social welfare, management, criminal 
justice, and biology. Courses in business and industrial psychology, 
psychological measurement, and consumer behavior are especially 
useful to students preparing for careers in business or public ser- 
vice. 

The psychology major develops skills in design and analysis of 
research and effective communication through the study of statis- 
tics, experimental methods, psychological measurement and 
psychological theory. Through involvement with behavior therapy 
and community psychology field work, the student can confront 
behavior problems in a more direct, practical fashion. The Psychol- 
ogy Department feels that it is only through a thorough grounding 
in basic skills and principles that the student can effectively realize 
his own goals. 



Requirements for the major 

Major requirements include P 111, P 301, P 305, P 321, P 350 
and 21 hours of advanced psychology courses, SC 121, SC 123, SO 
113, PL 111 or PL 124, and one college-level mathematics course. 
Only two 200-level psychology courses may be counted toward the 
major. Students anticipating graduate study should take P 341 and 
P 342 and should prepare themselves for graduate foreign language 
requirements. 



121 



Requirements for the minor 

The minor in psychology requires P111,P301,P 305, plus two 
300-level electives in psychology. Students in the School of Business 
Administration may substitute BA 216 Statistics for P 301. 



Behavioral Science Club 

Students in psychology have the opportunity to participate in 
the Behavioral Science Club. Its purpose is to provide opportunities 
both to socialize and to develop students' interests in the science and 
profession of psychology. Throughout the year the club sponsors 
guest lecturers and a variety of field trips. All students are welcome 
to join. 



Graduate study in psychology 

The University of New Haven offers the Master of Arts degree 
in Community Psychology and Organizational/Industrial Psychol- 
ogy. For descriptions of those programs, see the Graduate School 
catalog. 



Courses in Psychology 

P 111 Introduction to Psychology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Understanding human behavior. Motivation, emotion, learning, 
personality development, intelligence, as they relate to normal and 
deviant behavior. Applying psychological knowledge to everyday 
personal and societal problems. 

P 212 Business and Industrial Psychology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Pill. Psychological principles and research as they 
apply to the problems of working with people in organizations. 
Analysis of problems and decisions in the use of human resources, 
including selection and placement, criterion measurement, job de- 
sign, motivation. 

122 



P 216 Developmental Psychology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: P 111. Human development over the hfe cycle — 
conception through death; the changing societal and institutional 
framework; key concepts and theoretical approaches; understand- 
ing development through biography; child rearing and socialization 
here and abroad. 

P 220 Consumer Behavior 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: P 111. Principles and methods of understanding con- 
sumer decisions and choices. Internal and external influences on 
consumer behavior; decision processes; relationship between con- 
sumers and both private organizations and public agencies. 

P 240 Undergraduate Practicum in Community Psychology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: Pill and prior written permission of the instructor. 
Introduction to community problems and human needs; dynamics 
of mental health and human services; techniques of observing, 
summarizing and recording human interaction; supervised field 
placement with community agencies and projects. Eight hours of 
field work and three-hour seminar. 

P 251 Behavior Therapies 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: P 111. Principles of therapeutic behavior manage- 
ment. Alteration of maladaptive behavior patterns in institution- 
al, neighborhood, home, educational and social settings by operant 
and respondent reinforcement techniques. Habit management in 
oneself and one's children. 

P 301 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Any college-level mathematics course. Concepts and 
assumptions underlying statistical methods essential to design 
and interpretation of research on human subjects. Fundamental 
descriptive and inferential methods. 

P 305 Experimental Methods in Psychology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Corequisite: P 301. Methods of designing and analyzing psycholog- 
ical experiments. The scientific method as applied to psychology. 
Consideration of research techniques, experimental variables, de- 
sign problems, data analysis. 

123 



P 306 Psychology Laboratory 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: P 305. Group and individual experiments to be C£ir- 
ried out by students. Research techniques for studying learning, 
motivation, concept formation. Data analysis and report writing. 

P 315 Human and Animal Learning 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: P 111. Different types of human and animal learn- 
ing. Learning as an adaptive mechanism. Psychological principles 
underlying learning. Practical applications of learning principles. 

P 321 Social Psychology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as SO 320.) 

Required of psychology majors. 
Prerequisites: P 111 and SO 113. The interdependence of social 
organizations and behavior. The interrelationships between role 
systems and personality; attitude analysis, development and mod- 
ification; group interaction analysis; social conformity; social class 
and human behavior. 

P 336 Abnormal Psychology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Pill. Psychological and organic factors in personal- 
ity disorganization and deviant behavior. Psychodynamics and 
classifications of abnormal behavior. Disorders of childhood, 
adolescence, and old age. Evaluation of therapeutic methods. 

P 341 Psychological Theory I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: P 305 and junior class standing. Contemporary 
theory in psychology. Emphasis on those theories which have most 
influenced thinking and research in sensation, perception, learn- 
ing, etc. 

P 342 Psychological Theory II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: P 341. A continuation of P 341. Contemporary theory 
in motivation and personality. The historical and systematic roots 
of modern psychology. 

P 350 Human Assessment 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Required of psychology majors. 
Prerequisite: P 301. Basic principles of measurement, applied to 
problems of the construction, administration and interpretation of 

124 



standardized tests in psychological, educational and industrial set- 
tings. 

P 361 Physiological Psychology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: P 111, and SC 121, 122 or 123. Endocrinological, 
neural, sensory and response mechanisms involved in learning, 
motivation, adjustment, emotion, and sensation. 

P 370 Psychology of Personality 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: Pill and junior class standing. Theory and method 
in the understanding of normal and deviant aspects of personality, 
theories of Freud, Jung, Rogers, neo-Freudians and others. 

P 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a maximum of 

12. 
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman' of de- 
partment. Opportunity for the student under the direction of a 
faculty member to explore an area of interest to him. The course 
must be initiated by the student. 



Department of Sociology and 
Social Welfare 

Chairman: Associate Professor Walter O. Jewell III, Ph.D., Har- 
vard University. 

Professor: Faith H. Eikaas, Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

Associate Professor: Alfred Bradshaw, Ph.D., Syracuse Uni- 
versity. 

Assistant Professors: Allen Sack, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University; Michael J. Wynne, M.S.S.A., Case Western Reserve. 

Sociology provides the student with a quickened awareness of 
group behavior and expectations. As the youngest of the social 
sciences, sociology, couched in social philosophy and social criti- 
cism, seeks to understand social interaction and its implications. 
Although the discipline anticipates a humanistic orientation, it 
stresses ethical neutrality and regards empirical research as the 
major means of extending knowledge about man and awakening 
insight in predicting social indicators. This awareness becomes a 
useful background for graduate studies in medicine, law, business 

125 



and politics, as well as sociology itself. The sociology major is 
excellent preparation for such related fields as research, gov- 
ernmental service, personnel work, advertising, journalism and 
industry. 

Early in his academic career the student should seek out a 
departmental advisor who will guide him in a program geared to 
best serve his particular interests. Course sequences in social 
planning, social control, organizations, intergroup relations and 
social environment are among the selections he may choose. 



Requirements for the major 

The sociology major must take a total of 33 semester hours 
including Introductory Sociology, SO 113, either Social Problems, 
SO 114, (offered fall semester) or Deviance, SO 214, (offered spring 
semester) Research Methods, SO 250, Social Theory, SO 413, (of- 
fered spring semester) and Senior Seminar, SO 440, (offered fall 
semester) plus one course in statistics. Of the other 15 hours at 
least nine must be taken from the 300 level or above. A student 
may substitute three semester hours of SW (Social Welfare) credit 
for SO credit toward the major. SO 231, 311 and 320 are listed in 
other departments in the university schedules but are designated 
as comparable sociology listings and may be used as credit toward 
the major. 



Requirements for the minor 

A total of 18 semester hours in sociology is required for the 
minor. This must include SO 113, Introductory Sociology; SO 250, 
Research Methods; SO 413, Social Theory, plus three other 
courses, two of which must be at the 300 level or above. For these 
three additional courses the student is encouraged to seek an 
advisor within the department who will suggest a combination of 
courses focused on the student's interests and concerns. 



Anthropology concentration 

Anthropology provides a broad, cross disciplinary background 
and socio-cultural experience in the study of man. It is inter- 
disciplinary in scope with overlapping interests in the humanities, 

126 



social sciences, natural sciences and fine arts. The student, to- 
gether with his advisor works out a program tailored to his par- 
ticular needs and interests. This will include SO 220, Physical 
Anthropology and Archaeology; SO 221, Cultural Anthropology, 
SO 450 or 501, Research Seminar or Practicum; SC 201, Genetics 
and six other courses designated by the student's advisor and the 
course instructor as having sufficient anthropological content and 
focus to warrant credit in anthropology. Under advisement courses 
in political science, public administration, art, music and English 
as well as sociology may be used to fill these requirements. 

Students in anthropology may anticipate working in 
museums, for philanthropic, governmental or social service or- 
ganizations as well as going on to graduate school. A broad base 
such as anthropology provides one with a sound liberal arts core 
for more specialized backgrounds in the professions — medicine, 
law, dentistry, veterinary sciences and journalism. Contact the 
chairman of sociology for an appropriate advisor. 

The minor in anthropology 

A minor in anthropology is also possible. This anticipates a 
total of 18 hours in courses designated by the advisor and instructor 
as supporting the anthropological needs and interests of the stu- 
dent. This work includes SO 220, Physical Anthropology and Ar- 
chaeology; SO 221, Cultural Anthropology; SO 250, Research 
Methods or Research Seminar; plus three other courses in the dis- 
cipline. 



Social Welfare 

Modern society has established a wide variety of social welfare 
programs directed toward enhancing the social functioning of indi- 
viduals, developing and coordinating community services and im- 
proving institutions and processes of constructive social change. 
Services are classified according to the type of social problem or 
client group for which they are intended. Thus, there are agencies 
which deal with mental health problems, medical problems, income 
maintenance problems, marital discord, disturbed parent-child re- 
lationships, specialized services for children or the aged, services to 
offenders and programs for social action. 

The baccalaureate social welfare major is intended to prepare 
an individual for beginning social work practice in any of the above 

127 



settings and institutions. Social welfare workers have been as- 
signed heavy responsibilities in various programs through the prac- 
tice of casework, group work, social treatment, community organi- 
zation, research, administration and policy development. The bac- 
calaureate program is a generic introduction to all these areas, 
preparing the individual for a position in the social welfare system. 
Those intending to continue their social work education on a mas- 
ter's degree level will find the social welfare major an ideal founda- 
tion. 

The social welfare major at the University of New Haven is 
required in his senior year to satisfactorily complete a field place- 
ment in a social service agency in the New Haven area. A profes- 
sional person at the agency trains, supervises and evaluates each 
student. Seminars are held weekly to facilitate the integration of 
the theory learned in class and the practice methods used in the 
field. Such a combination will allow the student to acquire sufficient 
grounding to make an intelligent choice of method specialization, 
and simultaneously to gain perspective on major questions and 
developments occuring in the field and in the profession. 



Requirements for the major 

The social welfare major must take all of the social welfare 
courses listed below, with the exception of Independent Study; a 
total of 27 credit hours. In addition, the major is required to take 
Introduction to Sociology, SO 113; Research Methods, SO 250; 
Statistics, M 128 or P 301; and, either Deviance, SO 214, or Social 
Problems, SO 114. Developmental and Abnormal Psychology are 
recommended; however, they are not required. Other electives 
ought to reflect the personal interests and professional goals of the 
student. These electives should be worked out in consultation with 
an advisor, to whom the student will be assigned when he declares 
social welfare as his major. 



Requirements for the minor 

A total of 18 semester hours in social welfare courses is required 
for the minor in social welfare. This work must include Introduction 
to Social Welfare, SW 220; Group Dynamics, SW 340; Methods of 
Intervention I and II, SW 415-416; and Field Instruction I, SW 401. 

128 



Courses in Sociology 

so 113 Sociology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The role of culture in society, the person and personality; groups and 
group behavior; institutions; social interaction and social change. 

SO 114 Contemporary Social Problems 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113. The major problems which confront the pre- 
sent social order, and the methods now in practice or being consid- 
ered for dealing with these problems. 

SO 155 Women in Society 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An overview of woman's role in the social system. Discussion in- 
cludes myths and realities of sex differences. Areas covered include 
analysis of the relationship of women and the economy, the arts, 
sciences and how these effect the behavior of women in the contem- 
porary world. 

SO 214 Deviance 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of instructor. (Offered spring 
semester.) Centered around deviance as a social product. The prob- 
lematic nature of the stigmatization process is explored in such 
areas as alcoholism, crime, mental illness and sexual behavior. 

SO 218 The Community 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113. (Offered odd years, spring semester.) The 
community and its provision for health, education, recreation, 
safety and welfare; theoretical concepts of community, plus ethno- 
graphic studies of small scale human communities introduce stu- 
dents to fundamental concepts of community. 

SO 220 Physical Anthropology and Archaeology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An introduction to the study of human evolution 8aid of present 
physical variations among mankind. Includes geologic time, pri- 
mate evolution and early man and his culture. 

SO 221 Cultural Anthropology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A systematic study of the culture of preliterate and modern societies 
and of cultural change. Includes analyses of religion, economics, 
language, social and political organization and urbanization. 

129 



so 231 Juvenile Delinquency 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as CJ 221.) 
Prerequisites: SO 113 and Pill. This course is offered as CJ 221 in 
university schedules. An analysis of delinquent behavior in Ameri- 
can society; examination of the theories and social correlates of 
delinquency, and the socio-legal processes and apparatus for deal- 
ing with juvenile delinquency. 

SO 250 Research Methods 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore status. The student develops the concepts 
necessary for selection and formulation of research problems in 
social science, research design and techniques, analysis and in- 
terpretation of research data. 

SO 310 Primary Group Interaction 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113. Exploration of communication in group pro- 
cess, building a group and analyzing group structure and interac- 
tion; the ways people communicate emotionally and intellectually. 

SO 311 Criminology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as CJ 311.) 
Prerequisites: Pill and SO 113. An introduction to the principles 
and concepts of criminology: analysis of the social context of crimi- 
nal behavior, including a review of criminological theory, the na- 
ture and distribution of crime, the sociology of criminal law and the 
societal reactions to crime and criminals. 

SO 312 Marriage and the Family 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113. (Offered fall semester.) The structure and 
function of the family in American society: analysis of social rela- 
tions within the institution. Factors contributing to its successful 
functioning and those leading to alienation and social disorganiza- 
tion. 

SO 313 Sociology of Sport 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of the instructor. (Offered fall 
semester.) A study of the relationships between sport, culture and 
society. Emphasis is on both amateur and professional sports and 
their impact on the larger social order. Course will examine sport 
from a comparative and historical perspective but will also focus on 
problems confronting the world of sport in contemporary American 
society. 

130 



so 315 Social Change 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113. (Offered odd years, spring.) Sources, patterns 
and processes of social change with examination of classical and 
modern theories of major trends and developments as well as 
studies of perspectives on micro levels of change in modern society. 

SO 318 Political Sociology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113. (Offered even years, spring semester.) Con- 
cepts, theories and basic issues in the sociological analysis of politi- 
cal systems, social factors in political attitudes and behavior with 
emphasis on understanding the functional and dysfunctional as- 
pects of socio-political coordination and conflict. 

SO 320 Social Psychology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as P 321.) 
Prerequisites: Pill and SO 113. This course is offered as P 321 in 
university schedules. The interdependence of social organizations 
and behavior. The interrelationships between role systems and 
personality; attitude analysis, development and modification; 
group interaction analysis; social conformity; social class and 
human behavior. 

SO 321 Social Inequality 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113. Organization of social class: status, power and 
process of social mobility in contemporary society. Social stratifica- 
tion, its functions and dysfunctions as it relates to the distribution of 
opportunity, privilege and power in an industrial society. 

SO 322 Sociology of Education 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (Offered odd years, spring semes- 
ter.) 
Effects of education on American society: the organizational struc- 
ture; major emphasis on the interactive roles of students, teachers 
and administrators; particular concern with the relationship be- 
tween education and socio-economic status and problems of organi- 
zational change in the American school system. 

SO 331 Population and Ecology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 1 13 or permission of instructor. (Offered odd years, 
spring.) Societal implications of population changes and trends; 
impact of man as a social animal upon natural resources; cultural 
values and social structures, their influence on environmental 
ethics. 

131 



so 333 Sociology of Aging 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of instructor. (Offered even 
years, fall semester.) The sociological phenomenon of aging in 
America. Analysis of problems of age grading and prejudice; demo- 
graphic components of aging. Systematic review of major theoreti- 
cal and applied studies; special emphasis on medical and psycholog- 
ical institutionalization and problems of the self-managing old. 

SO 337 Human Sexuality 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of instructor. (Offered even 
years, fall.) A scientific study of human sexual behavioral patterns, 
social class attitudes and cultural myths. Topics include productive 
systems, conception, sexual attitudes and behavioral patterns, 
abortion and sexual laws and sexual deviance patterns. 

SO 340 Medical Sociology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of the instructor. (Offered even 
years, spring.) An analysis of a major social institution, the health 
care field. Emphasis placed on socio-cultural aspects of the field; 
general overview of the organization and delivery of health care 
services and the current problems and issues. 

SO 390 Sociology of Organizations 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of the instructor. (Offered even 
years, spring.) Classical sociological theories of organization with 
emphasis on the concepts of bureaucracy, scientific management, 
human relations and decision making theory. The relevance of 
these ideas to concrete organizational contexts, e.g., civil service, 
business, social movements and political parties, charitable institu- 
tions, hospitals. 
SO 400 Minority Group Relations 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SO 113. (Offered fall semester.) An interdisciplinary 
survey of minority groups in this country with particular attention 
paid to those ethnic, religious and racial factors that influence 
interaction. Designed to promote an understanding of sub-group 
cultures. 

SO 410 Urban Sociology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113. (Offered fall semester.) The problems of the 
cities. Residential patterns together with the physical development 

132 



of cities and redevelopment plans. An examination of groups of 
people and their environment and the relationship between the two. 

SO 413 Social Theory 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Nine hours in Sociology. (Offered spring semester.) 
An analysis of the development of sociology in the nineteenth cen- 
tury with particular emphasis on the theories of Comte, Durkheim, 
Simmel, Weber, Marx, de Tocqueville and others. 

SO 414 Sociology of Occupations and Professions 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of the instructor. A sociological 
analysis of the division of labor, occupational groupings, career 
patterns and professional associations in modern society. 

SO 418 Public Opinion and Social Pressure 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SO 113, P 111. (Offered even years, fall semester.) An 
intensive analysis of the nature and development of public opinion 
with particular consideration of the roles, both actual and potential, 
of communication and influence. 

SO 440 Undergraduate Seminar 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of departmental chairman. (Offered fall 
semester.) A detailed examination of selected topics in the field of 
sociology and a critical analysis of pertinent theories with emphasis 
on modern social thought. 

SO 441 Sociology of Death and Suicide 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of instructor. (Offered spring 
semester.) A confrontation with individual mortality and an 
academic investigation of primarily suicidal phenomena are 
explored within a context of crisis intervention. 

SO 450 Research Seminar 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: P 301 or M 128. The student develops and carries out 
an original research project in social science, reporting his proce- 
dure to the class. 

SO 501-502 Practicum 

Credit, 1-6 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the department chairman. Field experi- 
ence in sociology or anthropology. Seminars in conjunction with this 

133 



experience before off-campus field work is undertaken. Contact 
during the field work experience and guidance by the mentor pro- 
vide an opportunity for understanding group and individual 
dynamics and their repercussions. Follow-up seminars and a paper 
are required. 

SO 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a maximum 

of 12. 
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of depart- 
ment. Opportunity for the student, under the direction of a faculty 
member, to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be 
initiated by the student. 



Courses in Social Welfare 

SW 220 Introduction to Social Welfare 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113. An introduction to social welfare services and 
the field of social work. Included is an overview of various theories 
currently used in social work practice, and the situations for which 
they are applicable. 

SW 340 Group Dynamics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SO 113, SW 220 or permission of instructor. (Offered 
fall only.) The theory of small group functioning, and the manner in 
which groups affect the behavior, thinking, motivation and adjust- 
ment of individuals. Students will participate in a group which 
studies itself with the purpose of developing awareness of group 
processes and awareness of one's own functioning in group situa- 
tions. 

SW 350 Social Welfare as a Social Institution I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SW 220. (Offered fall semester only.) The background 
and development of the social services in relation to economic, 
political and social systems; analysis of the organization and deliv- 
ery of social services in an industrial society. 

SW 351 Social Welfare as a Social Institution II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SW 350. (Offered spring semester only.) Analysis of 
social welfare policies and programs including public assistance, 

134 



social insurances, urban renewal, anti-poverty programs, revenue 
sharing and income maintenance. 

SW 401-402 Field Instruction I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the Coordinator of Social Welfare. (SW 
401 offered fall only; SW 402 offered spring only.) Supervised ex- 
perience relevant to specific aspects of social welfare in human 
service agencies, institutions, and organizations at the local, state 
and federal level. Seminars to assist students with the integration 
of theoretical knowledge and field techniques through lectures and 
class presentations. Students are required to spend 8 hours a week 
in the field. 

SW 475 Issues in Social Work 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SW 401. (Offered spring semester only.) Examination 
of current issues of controversy in the field of social work, including 
the changing role of social work in the provision of social services, 
the functions of the baccalaureate social worker, and the respon- 
sibilities of the social worker being hosted in a non-social work 
agency. 

SW 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester; maximum of 12. 
Prerequisite: Consent of faculty member and department chair- 
man. Designed to permit the student to pursue original research of 
interest to him, where it is not already available in the normal 
curriculum. Must be directed by a faculty member. 



Department of Teacher Education 

Director: Professor Philip Olgin, Ed.D., Rutgers University. 

The university offers a minor in teacher education to those 
students who wish to explore teaching as a profession during their 
undergraduate years and desire to develop an additional area of 
expertise to reinforce their major field of study. This service en- 
ables such students to broaden their knowledge of neighboring 
public school systems and to expand their opportunities should 
they later decide on teaching as a career. Many public servants 
retire at an early age and can continue an active professional 
career as teachers in a related field if they are prepared to take 
advantage of such opportunities. 

135 



Many vocational fields require some professional training in 
teacher education for their training officers and for their adminis- 
trators especially in junior college and senior college departments. 
State certification is usually required only in public school systems 
supervised by the State Department of Education. 

The teacher education minor offers several advantages to stu- 
dents in all disciplines enrolled in the various schools at the Uni- 
versity of New Haven. Students may choose courses in this pro- 
gram for credit toward their bachelor's degree in their major field 
and enjoy a stimulating and interesting elective course. All of the 
basic professional courses in this program may be applied toward 
the State of Connecticut Provisional Teaching Certificate. 

These teacher education courses may be incorporated into a 
graduate school program leading to a master's degree and the 
permanent teaching certificate in the State of Connecticut. 

Requirements for the minor 

A total of 15 semester hours in teacher education courses is 
required for a minor. In addition, a basic course in Psychology, P 
111, is recommended. 



Courses in Teacher Education 

ED 225 The Adolescent Student 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Study of the theory and principles of the development of the ado- 
lescent from puberty to maturity. The physical, intellectual, emo- 
tional, social and moral growth and development of the adolescent. 

ED 324 History and Philosophy of Education 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A critical study of philosophical ideas and conflicting philosophies 
of Education viewed from historical perspectives and compared 
with current practices. A major purpose of this course is to develop 
an objective approach to educational points of view accompanied 
by discriminating historical research. Implications for contempor- 
ary educational practice are reviewed. 

ED 346 Directed Observation of the Secondary School 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Three periods weekly plus laboratory to be arranged. Structured as 
a Practicum. Directed visits to selected secondary schools. Labora- 

136 



tory field experiences include participation, tutoring, group meet- 
ings and individual conferences. Emphasis on the principles and 
problems of the secondary schools as developed through group and 
individual laboratory experiences. 

ED 447 Teaching in the Secondary School 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
General methods of teaching, problems confronting the inexperi- 
enced teacher such as discipline, lesson plans, teaching procedures 
and techniques, planning assignments, testing, grading, reporting 
to parents, and co-curricular activities; procedures are adapted to 
the major field of the student. 

ED 465 The Teaching-Learning Process 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Psychological principles underlying teaching procedures in the 
classroom; application of psychological findings and methods to 
educational practice; learning, motivation and individual differ- 
ences as they apply to effective teaching. 



Department of Physical Education 

Chairman: Assistant Professor Donald Wynschenk, M.S., South- 
ern Connecticut State College. 

Associate Professors: Joseph A. Machnik, Ph.D., University of 
Utah; Donald Ormrod, M.S., Southern Connecticut State Col- 
lege. 

Assistant Professors: Donald Burns, M.A., Teachers' College, 
Columbia University; Florindo Vieira, M.S., Southern Connec- 
ticut State College. 

The Department of Physical Education strives to serve stu- 
dents faced with a future abundant in leisure time in the construc- 
tion of healthful alternatives to the sedentary life-style charac- 
teristic of today's society. The university recognizes the impor- 
tance of this mission and requires two semesters of physical educa- 
tion for fulfillment of degree requirements. 

Courses in leisure carry-over activities such as golf, tennis, 
bowling, sailing, swimming-life saving, handball, and paddleball 
are augmented by traditional programs in team sports, volleyball, 
modem dance, slimnastics and the popular leisure living course 
which earns three credits and fulfills all physical education degree 
requirements. 

137 



It is hoped that the increased student interest in oriental 
combatives and courses in recreational outdoor activities such 
as back packing, camping, hiking and skiing will result in further 
development and course offerings. The department, as a service 
program, seeks to remain cognizant of the ever changing leisure 
and recreational needs of university students and encourages 
students to creatively participate in program development. 

In addition to the regular course program. The Department of 
Physical Education conducts a vast program of intramural compe- 
tition for men and women. Tournaments in tennis, basketball, 
volleyball, softball, bowling, touch football, floor hockey, foul 
shooting and paddleball are offered. Participants should avail 
themselves of the instructions in the student handbook concerning 
insurance and use of physical education facilities. 

Courses in Physical Education 

PE 100 Leisure Living 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Three distinct units designed to give the student a strong founda- 
tion of knowledge and skills for dealing with the abundance of 
leisure time and sedentary life style of today's society. Personal 
aspects of healthful living, first aid skill and technique, and an 
indepth study of leisure time activities such as tennis, sailing, golf, 
bicycling, aquatics, skating, bowling and racquet games including 
an examination of their historical, mechanical, physiological, and 
sociological implications are offered. A separate grade is given for 
each one-credit section and completion of the three-credit course 
satisfies degree requirements for physical education. 

PE 111-112 Physical Education 

(No credit, required for graduation.) 
Each section emphasizes a different lifetime of carry-over sport 
designed to give the student the experience of developing ability 
and skill in a physical activity which will help meet the demands 
of a future characterized by an abundance of leisure time. Ac- 
tivities such as tennis, golf, volleyball, paddleball, handball, bowl- 
ing, skating, swimming, sailing, skiing, softball, badminton and 
bicycling are taught in a recreational atmosphere created to en- 
courage the student to continue and further develop his interest 
and skill through involvement in intramurals and community 
recreation programs of a private or commercial nature. Students 
may register for as many sections or semesters of these courses as 
their interests warrant. 

138 



SCHOOL OF 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Warren J. Smith, Dean 
Bachelor of Science degree programs 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Business Data Processing 

Communication 

Criminal Justice 

with programs in 

Criminal Justice Administration 

Forensic Science 

Correctional Administration 
Economics 
Finance 

Hotel Management 
Institutional Management 
International Business 
Management Science 
Marketing 

Operations Management 
Personnel Management 
Public Administration 
Retailing 
Tourism 



139 



Associate in Science degree programs 

Business Administration 
Correctional Administration 
Hotel Administration 
Law Enforcement 
Retailing 



Business Administration 

The School of Business Administration offers programs leading 
to degrees in accounting, business administration, business data 
processing, communication, criminal justice, economics, finance, 
hotel management, international business, management science, 
institutional management, marketing, business/science, opera- 
tions management, personnel management, public administration, 
retailing and tourism. 

Forty to 60 percent of the course work in these programs is in 
the arts and sciences to insure a liberal education in addition to a 
sound preparation for a career in business or administration. The 
student majoring in business administration may select one of 19 
minors in the arts and sciences. This option permits the business 
student to undertake advanced work in an arts or science discipline. 
A junior or senior is required to participate in one of the prac- 
ticums available in the School of Business Administration, such as 
the Small Business Institute or the New Products and Concepts 
Laboratory. These experiences introduce the student to the chal- 
lenge of business realities before graduation. 

The Master of Business Administration, Master of Public Ad- 
ministration, Master of Science in Criminal Justice, Master of Sci- 
ence in Accounting and Master of Science in Taxation are primarily 
professional degree programs in which the major objective is to 
develop practitioners of business and administration. Many men 
and women who are enrolled are at the same time employed in 
various public and private organizations and are working toward 
their degrees on a part-time basis. 

The Executive Master of Business Administration is also of- 
fered by the School of Business Administration. The program is 
designed to enhance the skills and performance of participating 
executives through an integrated and complete educational pro- 
gram at the graduate level and leads to the award of a graduate 
degree. 



140 



Accounting is selected by those who wish to make this their 
career, including possibly ultimate attainment of the Certified Pub- 
lic Accountant license. Accounting has long been recognized as a 
preferred route to management responsibilities in many fields of 
business. The student has the option of selecting the financial ac- 
counting concentration or the managerial accounting concentra- 
tion. 

Business administration is the field generally chosen by 
those students who have not yet developed their career objectives. 

Business data processing provides young professional man- 
agers with a command of computer skills. They are among the col- 
lege graduates most sought after by business today. 

Business economics is selected by those students who wish to 
obtain a firm background in business plus a theoretical base as 
input into decision making. 

Business science programs have strong input from both busi- 
ness and science disciplines and prepare students for entry into the 
chemical, biological, pharmaceutical and related industries. 

Communication provides unlimited opportunities to the 
graduate. A career field may be chosen in any one of several media. 

Criminal justice is a four-year bachelor degree program. 
These programs are planned for high school graduates interested in 
any of the many careers in the administration and operation of 
criminal justice agencies on the Federal, state and local levels of 
government. Three programs are offered: law enforcement, forensic 
science and corrections. 

Finance is one of the disciplines that has extensive application 
to business generally. 

Hotel and restaurant management majors acquire special- 
ized career skills which prepare them for a variety of positions in 
hotel and motel management. 

Institutional management is a field offering opportunities 
in both public and private institutions. The student learns food 
delivery, systems management, personnel management facilities 
and auxiliary service planning, institutional health and education 
facilities planning. 

International business is a comparatively new field of study 
dealing with the problems of developing and adapting business 
practices for the purpose of operating within different economies, 
different political systems and different cultures. 

Management science provides the student with an under- 
standing of the business organization and the concepts underlying 
the managerial processes. The graduate has numerous oppor- 
tunities available to him in many fields of business. 

141 



Marketing is a widely recognized phase of business that pre- 
sents unmatched opportunities to the qualified graduate, whether 
his interests are in the selling, managing or analytical phases. 

Operations management is a growing profession. Its prac- 
tices make increased use of quantitative analysis in the scientific 
management of business. Students with specific interest in data 
processing usually select this field. 

Personnel management is a discipline offering excellent 
C£ireer opportunities for both men and women. Majoring in person- 
nel management affords the student an opportunity to obtain a solid 
foundation in the behavioral sciences within a business administra- 
tion program. 

Public administration is designed to prepare students for 
careers in public affairs (government service, politics), governmen- 
tal research, graduate school, or to give an insight into various 
governmental organizations, functions and methodology which are 
used to both determine and provide services to the people. 

Retailing is an interesting field with career opportunities in 
sales, advertising, merchandising or buying. 

Tourism offers a wide variety of careers in a rapidly expanding 
field. The economic, sociological and cultural aspects of tourism 
are examined. 

Cooperative Program In Economics 

In cooperation with Southern Connecticut State College, stu- 
dents in any program within the School of Business Administration 
at the University of New Haven may take up to 12 semester hours of 
advanced courses in economics offered by the Department of 
Economics at Southern Connecticut State College. The 12 semester 
hours taken at Southern Connecticut State College will constitute 
part of a student's regular work toward a degree at the University of 
New Haven. 

Courses offered by the Department of Economics at Southern 
Connecticut State College which may be of particular interest to 
University of New Haven students include urban economics, man- 
agerial economics, economics seminar and other advanced 
economics courses. 

University of New Haven students interested in taking courses 
offered by the Department of Economics at Southern Connecticut 
State College will be required to register at the University of New 
Haven with their departmental advisor. During Spring and Fall 
registration, faculty advisors and the Office of the Dean, School of 

142 



Business, will have available the catalog of Southern Connecticut 
State College and a current schedule of courses offered by its De- 
partment of Economics. 

Full time students at the University of New Haven taking one 
or more courses at Southern Connecticut State College in any 
semester must register at the University of New Haven and pay the 
University's current tuition charge for full time day undergraduate 
students. 



Minors 

The student majoring in business administration may select 
one of the following minors: 

Applied Design Materials Engineering 

Art Mathematics 

Biology Mechanical Engineering 

Chemistry Music Appreciation 

Civil Engineering Philosophy 

Communication Physics 

Economics Political Science 

Electrical Engineering Psychology 

English Public Administration 

History Sociology 

History- area studies 

With the exception of the prerequisite for the minor that may be 
required in the core, the student enrolled in the School of Business 
Administration will not be allowed any more courses than required 
in the specific minor field. Should he enroll for an extra course in the 
minor, the course will be treated as excess credit. Though a minor is 
granted because it offers a concentration within a discipline above 
the survey level, the business major must maintain as varied a 
selection of liberal arts courses as may be available to him, exclu- 
sive of electives used to fill the minor requirements. Electives that 
remain after the student has completed his minor must be taken in 
other disciplines. 

Only one minor will be recognized, but a student may change 
his minor. 

Before the end of the sophomore year a student must select a 
business major and a minor after consultation with the appropriate 
chairman or other designated advisor. The degree program for the 
student's third and fourth years will be prepared in consultation 
with an advisor. This will involve the selection of electives in addi- 

143 



tion to the required courses. Any university course may be used as 
an elective. 

Courses offered outside of the School of Business Administra- 
tion or the Industrial Engineering Department of the School of 
Engineering consist of not less than 40 percent of all work taken 
toward graduation. A minimum of 120 semester hours is required 
for graduation. 

The junior or senior student may be required to participate in 
one of the programs available in the School of Business Administra- 
tion, such as the Small Business Institute or the New Products and 
Concepts Laboratory. These experiences introduce the student to 
the challenge of business realities before graduation. 



Department of Accounting 

Chairman: Assistant Professor Jeffrey L. Williams, C.P.A., 
M.B.A., University of Bridgeport. 

Associate Professor: Richard Reimer, C.P.A., M.S., Columbia 
University. 

Assistant Professors: Martin Zern, C.P.A., LL.M., New York 
University; Anne Rich, C.P.A., M.B.A., University of 
Bridgeport. 

Instructors: Robert Kravet, C.P.A., M.S., University of Mas- 
sachusetts; Lawrence Logan, C.P.A., M.S.B.A., University of 
Massachusetts. 

Accounting continues to be identified by its overall purpose: 
providing information about economic entities for use by economic 
decision makers. The study of accounting emphasizes the economic 
decision making process as well as the principles and procedures 
which are used to produce the information required by decision 
makers. Accounting promotes an appreciation for not only the na- 
ture of accounting information, but also its use in the complex 
process of decision making by individuals, business firms and gov- 
ernment. The Department of Accounting at the University of New 
Haven seeks to serve the educational needs of those involved in all 
areas of accounting; public, private or governmental. 

On the graduate level, the Department of Accounting offers 
programs leading to the Master of Science in Accounting and the 
Master of Science in Taxation. These programs provide a frame- 
work for a general inquiry into current accounting issues. In addi- 

144 



tion, the programs allow a student, if he wishes, to pursue a con- 
centration in financial accounting or managerial accounting. 

On the undergraduate level, the bachelor's degree program 
reflects the requirements of state regulatory boards and those of 
professional accounting organizations and is designed to prepare 
students for professional status as either financial or managerial 
accountants. 



Requirements for the financial accounting major 

The financial accounting major is selected by those students 
wishing to pursue a career in public accounting leading to the 
Certified Public Accountant (C.P.A.) license. The financial account- 
ing major is required to complete at least 36 semester hours of 
covirse work in accounting. In addition to the fundamentals of ac- 
counting courses (Alll - 112), financial accounting majors are 
required to complete a sequence of course work in cost and manage- 
rial accounting (A223, A224 and A225), a series of courses in finan- 
cial accounting principles (A221, A222, A331 and A332), plus 
course work in taxation (A335-336) and auditing ( A333). Additional 
course work in accounting may be elected by the financial account- 
ing major throughout the program of study. 



Requirement for the managerial accounting major 

The managerial accounting major is selected by students wish- 
ing to pursue a c£ireer in private accounting as management ac- 
countants including the possible attainment of the Certificate of 
Management Accounting (CM. A.). The managerial accounting 
major is required to complete at least 33 semester hours of course 
work in accounting and 12 semester hours in related subjects. 

In addition to the fundamentals of accounting courses (A 111- 
112) managerial accounting majors are required to complete a 
series of cost and managerial accounting courses (A 223, A 224 and 
A 225), a sequence of course work in financial accounting principles 
(A 221, A 222 and A 332) plus course work in taxation (A 335-A 336) 
and auditing (A 333). The managerial accounting major is also 
required to complete course work in economics (EC 3 1 1 and EC 445), 
in quantitative analysis (QA 333), financial management (FI 229) 
and management (MG 350). 

145 



Courses in Accounting 



A 111 Introductory Accounting I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite to all other courses in accounting. A fundamental 
examination of the concepts, principles and procedures embodied in 
the finsmcial accounting system. Emphasis will be placed upon the 
preparation of financial statements for service rendering and mer- 
chandising business concerns through the application of financial 
accounting principles. 

A 112 Introductory Accounting II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 111. An extension of the fundamental examination 
developed in A 1 1 1 to include the application of financial accounting 
principles for manufacturing business concerns. Additional em- 
phasis will be placed upon an introduction to, and application of, 
managerial accounting principles for planning and controlling 
manufacturing operations. 

A 221 Intermediate Financial Accounting I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 112. A rigorous examination of financial accounting 
theory and practice applicable to the corporate form of business 
organization. With an emphasis upon reporting corporate financial 
status and results of operations, the course will include: the princi- 
ples governing, and the procedures implementing, accounting val- 
uations for revenue, expense, gain, loss, current assets, investments 
and funds, fixed assets (tangible and intangible), other assets and 
deferred charges. Throughout, reference is made to the relevant 
publications of professional accounting societies and associations. 

A 222 Intermediate Financial Accounting II ^ 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 221. Continuing the emphasis upon corporate fi- 
nancial reporting established in A 221, the principles and proce- 
dures applicable to accounting valuations for current liabilities, 
long-term liabilities, deferred credits and stockholders equity are 
examined. Special attention is directed to preparing the statement 
of changes in financial position. Additional topics include income 
tax allocation, pensions and leases, accounting changes, price level 
changes, installment sales and consignments. Throughout, refer- 
ence is made to the relevant publications of professional accounting 
societies and associations. 

146 



A 223 Cost Accounting I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 112. An in-depth examination of the financial ac- 
counting principles and procedures underlying the determination 
and reporting of product costs for manufacturing concerns. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the concepts and classifications of product 
costs (direct material, direct labor and manufacturing overhead), as 
well as the recording and accumulating of such costs within job 
order and process cost accounting systems. 

A 224 Cost Accounting II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 223. A continuation of the emphasis on product-cost 
determination established in A 223, integrated with an examina- 
tion of accounting systems for managerial planning and control. 
Topics include budgeting, standard costs, variance analysis, direct 
costing, cost- volume-profit analysis and joint and by-product cost- 
ing. 

A 225 Advanced Managerial Accounting 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 224. A comprehensive analysis of the uses of and 
behavioral implications of managerial accounting information. 
Emphasis will be placed upon the economic and motivational im- 
pact of internal accounting information for planning and control- 
ling operations. Topics include budgets (capital and operating), 
performance reports, responsibility accounting (cost, profit and in- 
vestment centers), transfer-pricing, performance measurement, 
contribution reporting, pricing methods and relevant costs of deci- 
sion making. 

A 230 Fund Accounting 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 221 or permission of the instructor. An examination 
of fund accounting principles based upon the most recent pro- 
nouncements of the National Committee on Governmental Ac- 
counting. The emphasis will be placed on accounting for municipal 
governments, although accounting for other governmental and 
not-for-profit entities may be covered at the option of the instructor. 

A 331 Advanced Financial Accounting I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 222. An examination and evaluation of the litera- 
ture generated by authoritative financial accounting boards to de- 
termine its effect on the structure of financial accounting theory, its 

147 



impact on financial accounting practice and its implications for the 
future role of the accountant. Extensive use is made of the publica- 
tions of professional accounting societies and accounting associa- 
tions. 

A 332 Advanced Financial Accounting II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 222. A concentrated examination of financial ac- 
counting concepts and the principles and procedures applicable to 
partnership and consolidation accounting. Partnership topics in- 
clude: formation and division of income, changes in ownership and 
liquidation. Consolidation topics include comprehensive coverage 
of the cost and equity methods, as well as other issues (purchase 
versus pooling of interests, entity theory, etc.) related to consolida- 
tion accounting. Other financial accounting topics of a specialized 
nature not previously covered can be included at the discretion of 
the instructor. 

A 333 Auditing Principles 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 222. A general examination of the role and function 
of the independent auditor in the performance of the attest function. 
Emphasis will be placed on current auditing pronouncements, the 
audit report, statistical sampling, evaluation of internal control and 
the determination of the scope of an audit. 

A 334 Auditing Procedures 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 333. An examination and evaluation of the detailed 
procedures associated with auditing accounts related to a firm's 
financial position, changes in financial position and operating re- 
sults. An evaluation and documentation of internal control proce- 
dures will be an integral aspect of the evaluation of the fairness of 
accounting balances. A practical audit case will be used to develop 
an appreciation for the application of auditing techniques. 

A 335 Federal Income Taxation I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 112. An introduction to the federal income tax 
laws. Course coverage will be devoted primarily to individual taxa- 
tion, including determination of gross income and adjusted gross 
income, capital gains and losses, deductions, exemptions, withhold- 
ing, estimated tax and tax return preparations. 

148 



A 336 Federal Income Taxation II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: A 335. A continuation of A 335, including coverage of 
installment sales, inventory, tax accounting, taxation of corpora- 
tions and shareholders and tax procedural aspects. A synopsis of 
Social Security and the Federal Estate Gift Taxes is also presented. 

A 341 Financial Decision Making 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: BA 113. The principles and procedures associated 
with optimal decision making within the functional areas of 
finance. Emphasis is placed upon an understanding of the applica- 
tions and limitations of decision models for the investment, financ- 
ing, and dividend decisions of the profit oriented business unit. 



Department of Communication 

Chairman: Gilbert L. Whiteman, Ph.D., Michigan State Univer- 
sity. 

Assistant Professors: Thomas A. Nash, Ph.D., Michigan State 
University; Steven A. Raucher, Ph.D., Wayne State University. 

Words, in and of themselves, have no meaning. Only people 
have meanings. Given a degree of commonality in our life experi- 
ences when words are learned, we strive for understanding. The 
basis for all human understanding is communication. 

The communication programs at the University of New Haven 
allow each student to develop his interpersonal and mass communi- 
cation skills and awareness through a sequentially patterned series 
of course offerings. 

The programs for communication majors are built around excit- 
ing studies designed for students who have a wide range of interests. 
Whether the student envisions his future in communication to be 
that of a television cameraman, an on-the-air news broadcaster, a 
researcher or producer for documentary films or an investigator of 
why people say what they say and the effects of those utterances on 
society, it is our sincere objective to assist the student in attaining 
his goal. 

Since the Department of Communication works very closely 
with many local media and with other departments of the univer- 
sity, development of the "whole person" concept of education is the 
aim. The communication programs allow sufficient flexibility to 
accommodate any communication major's career objective. 

149 



Students majoring in communication at the University of New 
Haven will acquire the pre-professional skills needed to enter the 
field after earning their undergraduate degrees. Communication is 
a crucial and challenging responsibility in today's complex society. 

The department attempts to reach its objective by offering two 
degrees at the four-year level. 



Bachelor of Science Degree 

In this degree program, which is offered within the School of 
Business Administration, the production and technical aspects of 
film and broadcasting are emphasized. The student majoring in this 
program is usually oriented toward programming, production, 
media management and on-the-air skill development. 



Bachelor of Arts Degree 

This program is offered through the School of Arts and Sciences 
and normally carries a strong minor in journalism. It emphasizes 
the aesthetic and creative aspects of the major and travels lightly 
along the technical and production paths. 

In either degree program, the student majoring in communica- 
tion at the University of New Haven will have common programs 
with other communication majors for the first several terms. The 
initial communication courses introduce the students to the general 
field of interpersonal and mass communication and the processes 
involved in the study of human and mass interaction. With this 
initial orientation complete, the student is then better qualified to 
make an intelligent choice of major specialty within the depart- 
ment. 



Requirements for the major 

The communication major, in either the Bachelor of Science or 
Bachelor of Arts program, must take at least 30 semester hours of 
credit in communication (CO) courses. In addition to the most basic 
course, CO 100, entitled Human Communication I, which should be 
taken during the student's first term, all majors must complete 
Fundamentals of Mass Communication, CO 101, and Problems of 
Mass Communication, CO 102. The balance of the program, which 

150 



will depend on one's individual orientation and goals, will be deter- 
mined in individual conference with the student and his advisor. 



Requirements for the minor 

A total of 18 semester hours of communication course credits 
must be earned in order for a student to declare the field as a 
completed minor area of study. This work must include Human 
Communication I, CO 100. The balance of the minor program is 
worked-out in individual conference with the student and his Com- 
munication Department (minor) advisor. 

The Department of Communication enjoys institutional mem- 
bership in the National Association of Educational Broadcasters 
(NAEB) and the Connecticut Broadcasters Association (CBA). Stu- 
dents and faculty have a close liaison with the management and 
staff of WNHU, the campus FM station. Faculty members and some 
of the students belong to such professional organizations as the 
International Communications Association and the professional 
journalistic society, Sigma Delta Chi. The students of the Depart- 
ment of Communication will soon initiate a local chapter of Alpha 
Epsilon Rho, the national honorary radio-television fraternity. 



Courses in Communication 

CO 100 Human Communication I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The basic course in communication. Objectives are to create within 
each student an awareness of the omnipresence of communication 
and the problems surrounding the human communication process. 

CO 101 Fundamentals of Mass Communication 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CO 100. An introduction to the mass media of news- 
papers, film, magazines, radio, television, trade publication and 
public relations. Course emphasizes media's impact upon society. 

CO 102 Problems of Mass Communication 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CO 101. Examines such problems as regulatory con- 
trol of the media, law and ethics and the behavioral aspects of mass 
and interpersonal communication. Students examine the variety of 
media writing and commence writing their own media messages. 

151 



CO 206 Sound Workshop 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Concerned with sound as used in radio, television and film. The 
course entails lectures, demonstrations and lab practice of sound 
production and transmission. Laboratory fee: $10.00. 

CO 208 Introduction to Broadcasting 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The student experiences script writing and voice, diction and articu- 
lation drills. He coordinates with other production team members 
for dramatic and nondramatic presentations. He learns the place of 
each member of the team in attaining the broadcast objectives. 

Laboratory fee: $10.00. 

CO 210 Film Production Theory and Practice 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CO 101 or permission of the instructor. Stresses the 
understanding of film as a creative form of communication. Student 
is introduced to basic techniques of motion picture production 
through lectures, audiovisual activity and small group involve- 
ment. Laboratory fee: $10.00. 



CO 215 Television Production I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CO 208. Introduction to the mechanics, techniques 
and aesthetic elements of television production. This course pro- 
vides the basic grounding in the art and craft of the medium. 

Laboratory fee: $20.00 

CO 216 Television Production II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CO 215. An intermediate course designed to provide 
the student with the opportunity to coordinate the many areas of 
TV production. Video tape and live production techniques are 
employed. Laboratory fee: $20.00. 

CO 220 Film Production I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CO 210. Involves the transformation of an original 
idea into film: initial analysis, proposed treatment plan, sequenc- 
ing, film scripting, pre-production planning, nature of the produc- 
tion process. A short film is produced through team effort. 

Laboratory fee: $20.00. 

152 



CO 230 Film Production II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CO 220. The creative process involved in translating 
advertising copy to film based upon advertising objectives and con- 
sumer motivation, appeals and behavior. Involves production of 
filmed spots by team effort. Laboratory fee: $20.00. 

CO 307 Writing for Television and Radio 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CO 208. A study of drills and exercises in writing 
television and radio news, drama, public service announcements, 
and documentaries. Emphasis is placed in firsthand practical ex- 
perience assignments and criticism of completed copy. 

CO 308 Broadcast JournaUsm 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CO 307. Entails practice in news gathering, editing, 
writing, and use of news services and sources. Creating documen- 
tary and special event programs through film for television news, 
on-the-spot film, and videotape reporting are included. 

CO 315 Advanced Television Production 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CO 216. The perfection of techniques acquired in CO 
215 and CO 216. Essentials of budgeting, marketing, and regula- 
tory policies and rules. Production teams are formed to produce 
sophisticated local television programs under close supervision. 

Laboratory fee: $20.00. 

CO 402 Practical Problems of Mass Communication 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: Communication majors only; upper division stand- 
ing; permission of instructor. A seminar examining current prob- 
lems encountered by various mass media, to include print as well as 
electronic media. Students visit local media managers regularly to 
ascertain real life solutions to media problems. 

CO 410 Management Communication Seminar 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Open to all upper division students, regardless of major. Involves 
structure and function of communication in organizations. Practice 
in understanding and managing interpersonal differences. Em- 
phasizes concepts and principles needed for effective management 
of organizational communication processes. 

153 



CO 415 Television-Radio Studio Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CO 208. Involves the administrative and personnel 
problems of television and radio studio management; broadcast 
engineering; local sales; continuity and programming. Discussions 
will include scheduling and the development of facilities. 

CO 599 Independent Study in Communication 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a maximum 

of 12. 
Prerequisite: Consent of faculty member and chairman of depart- 
ment. Three to six hours are usually reserved for a senior project in 
communication. Opportunity for the student under the direction of 
a faculty member to explore an area of interest. The course must be 
initiated by the student. Independent study credits earned in other 
departments are applied toward the maximum of 12 in Communica- 
tion. 



Division of Criminal Justice 

Chairman: Associate Professor L. Craig Parker, Ph.D., State Uni- 
versity of New York at Buffalo. 

Associate Professors: Robert D. Meier, Ph.D., Columbia Univer- 
sity; Gerald D. Robin, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Assistant Professors: Andrew Kayiira, M.A., State University 
of New York; Henry Lee, Ph.D., New York University; Robert 
Murillo, M.A., University of New Mexico; Edwin C. Pearson, 
LL.M., Harvard University; Belinda Rogers, M.A., State Uni- 
versity of New York. 

Criminal justice is the formal mechanism of social control 
through which a complex society exercises control over its members. 
The study of criminal justice is an interdisciplinary one, involving 
the law, social and behaviorial sciences. It traces the nature and 
genesis of the law, studies crime and the criminal and the reaction of 
society to crime. Criminal justice is studied against the backdrop of 
the greater issue of social justice. 

There is a wide variety of career opportunities available in 
criminal justice at the local, state and federal levels. Because of its 
interdisciplinary approach, the study of criminal justice fills the 
needs of students seeking careers in teaching, research, and law, 

154 



i nd of in-service personnel seeking academic and professional ad- 
vancement. 

The Criminal Justice Division of the University of New Haven 
uses both conventional and innovative techniques to provide stu- 
dents with a wide variety of experiences and insights. These include 
lectures, written assignments, seminars, workshops, internships 
and independent studies. 



Requirements for the major 

The number of required criminal justice courses varies with the 
area of concentration selected by each student. The law enforcement 
major must complete 42 hours of specified criminal justice courses, 
the corrections major is required to complete 48 hours of specified 
criminal justice courses, and the forensic science major has 27 hours 
of specified criminal justice courses. In each program the remaining 
required courses are selected to coincide with the specialized need of 
each major. In addition, each program contains restricted electives 
chosen in consultation with an advisor. All majors have science, 
math, English, research methods and statistics requirements. 
Every student should inform his advisor of his intended major. 



Requirements for the minor 

A total of 18 semester hours are the requirement for a criminal 
justice minor. Students must take Introduction to Criminal Justice 
(CJ 101) and Criminal Law (CJ 102), and the remaining courses will 
be selected to give the student a cross-sectional view of the criminal 
justice system while taking into account the student's general pro- 
gram and career objective. 



Courses in Criminal Justice 

CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A survey of the structures and processes in the administration of 
justice; analysis of the criminal justice sequence including the foun- 
dations of criminal law, the elements and procedures of conviction, 
and the various dispositions available for convicted offenders. 

155 



CJ 102 Criminal Law 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The scope, purpose and definitions of criminal law, including: crim- 
inal liability, major elements of statutory and common law offenses 
(with some reference to Connecticut Penal Code), and the signifi- 
cant defenses. 

CJ 104 Introduction to Police and Law Enforcement 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A general survey course intended to acquaint the student with 
major developments and problems in policing. The course will stress 
the role of police in a pluralistic society from the mid-nineteenth 
century to the present. 

C J 107 Introduction to Corrections 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An introduction and overview of the correctional process, with spe- 
cial attention being given to structures, practices and problems of 
institutional confinement. 

CJ 201 Principles of Criminal Investigation 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An introduction to criminal investigation in the field. Conducting 
the crime scene search, interview of witnesses, interrogation of 
suspects, methods of surveillance and the special techniques em- 
ployed in particular kinds of investigation. 

C J 205 Interpersonal Relations 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Interpersonal psychology as it applies to criminal justice. Empiri- 
cally validated techniques for practice and training. Topics include 
facilitating communication, role playing, self-disclosure, group 
dynamics, crisis intervention and behavioral techniques. 

CJ 209 Correctional Treatment Programs 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Various treatment modalities employed in the rehabilitation of 
offenders. Field visits to various correctional treatment facilities 
such as half-way houses and community based treatment programs. 

CJ 215 Introduction to Forensic Science 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A classroom lecture-discussion session and a laboratory period. 
Topics include the recognition, identification and evaluation of 
hairs, fibers, chemicals, narcotics, blood, semen, glass, soil, finger- 
prints, documents, ballistics and tool marks. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

156 



CJ 217 Criminal Procedure I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An inquiry into the nature and scope of the U. S. Constitution, as it 
relates to criminal procedures. Areas discussed include: the law of 
search and seizure arrests, confessions and identification. 

CJ 218 Criminal Procedure II and Evidence 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Legal doctrines employed in controlling the successive stages of the 
criminal process: rules of law related to wiretapping and lineups, 
pre-trial decision making, juvenile justice and trial. 

CJ 220 Legal Issues in Corrections 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An examination of the legal foundation of correctional practice and 
a review of recent judicial decisions which are altering the correc- 
tional environment. An analysis of the factors and forces which are 
creating a climate of significant reform in corrections. 

CJ 221 Juvenile Delinquency 

Credit, 3 semester hours, (see SO 231). 
Prerequisites: P 111 and SO 113. An analysis of delinquent be- 
havior in American society: examination of the theories and social 
correlates of delinquency, and the socio-legal processes and ap- 
paratus for dealing with juvenile delinquency. 

C J 300 History of Criminal Justice 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An introduction to the historical evolution of the criminal justice 
system in the United States. The development of police, courts and 
corrections in the United Kingdom and other English-speaking 
nations will be traced and compared with the American experience. 

C J 301 Group Dynamics in Criminal Justice 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: P 111 Psychology. An analysis of theory and applied 
methods in the area of group process. Focus on both individual roles 
and group development as they relate to criminal justice issues. 
Experiential exercises are included. 

CJ 302 Behaviorism: Applications in Criminal Justice 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: P 111 Psychology. An examination of behavioral 
theory and its application to criminal justice, exploring token 
economies, aversion therapy, contingency contracting and other 
techniques. Discussion of practical and ethical issues of behavior 
modification. 

157 



C J 303-304 Forensic Science Laboratory I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Greater attention given to specific topics and to laboratory testing 
and identifications than in CJ 215. In the classroom, laboratory 
practical procedures are outlined and discussed. The laboratory 
work involves testing and identification of evidence, and more de- 
tailed procedures are undertaken than in CJ 215. An example 
would be the casting of hairs and fibers for microscopic identifica- 
tion of material which contains a narcotic or blood. 

Laboratory Fee: $15.00 per semester. 

CJ 309 Probation and Parole 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior status required. An in-depth analysis of proba- 
tion, parole and varied alternatives to imprisonment: examination 
of findings of evaluative research of probation and parole and re- 
sults with current and experimental non-institutional correctional 
programs. 

CJ 311 Criminology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An examination of principles and concepts leading to an under- 
standing of criminal behavior, criminological theory, the nature, 
extent and distribution of crime, and legal and societal reactions to 
crime. 

C J 400 Criminal Justice Problems Seminar 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior status required. An examination of theoretical 
and philosophical issues impinging upon the administration of jus- 
tice: the problems of reconciling legal and theoretical ideals in 
various sectors of the criminal justice system with the realities of 
practice. 

CJ 402 Police-Community Relations 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: SO 113. Designed to put the police and community 
into a broad theoretical context. Sociological and environmental 
implications are examined. Attention is given to police practices 
which have caused much public hostility and which have isolated 
law enforcement from the community. 

CJ 405 Seminar In Criminal Justice 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Senior status required. An intensive analysis of vari- 
able topics of critical relevance in the administration of justice: a 

158 



seminar exposing the student to a concentrated learning experience 
conducive to acquiring special expertise in a specific academic area. 

CJ 408 Correctional Counseling 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior status required. Fundamental psychological 
counseling theory as it applies to treatment of offenders. 

CJ 498 Research Project 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Senior status required. The student carries out an 
original research project in a criminal justice setting and reports his 
study. 

C J 499 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a maximum 

of 12. 
Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. An opportunity for the student, 
under the direction of a faculty member, to explore and acquire 
competence in a special area of interest. 

CJ 501 Criminal Justice Internship 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the department 
chairman. This program provides monitored field experience with 
selected federal, state, or local criminal justice agencies or forensic 
science laboratories subject to academic guidance and review. MG 
449 Independent Study may be substituted with approval of the 
chairman. 



Department of Economics 

Acting Chairman: Associate Professor John Teluk, M.A., Free 
University of Munich. 

Professors: Franklin P. Sherwood, Ph.D., University of Illinois; 
Joseph A. Parker, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma; Alan Plot- 
nick, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Associate Professors: Ahmed Mandour, Ph.D., University of Ok- 
lahoma; George Karatzas, Ph.D., New York University; Ward 
Theilman, Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Assistant Professor: Willard Petersen, M.B.A., Dartmouth 
College. 

159 



Economics courses provide a basis for an understanding of 
economic structures, a wide range of domestic and international 
issues and trends in the economic life of modern societies. 
Economics courses offer training in analysis of economic problems 
as an aid to the evaluation of economic policies. 

Our introductory courses are designed to provide the founda- 
tion of economic knowledge that every citizen of a modern complex 
society should have in order to understand the decisions of indi- 
vidual economic units and the operation of a national economy as a 
whole. 

Our advanced courses are designed primarily for economics and 
business majors. They cover in-depth specific economic topics. They 
also attempt to prepare students for economic research and man- 
agement positions in financial institutions, individual organiza- 
tions, government or graduate study and teaching. Thus, the De- 
partment of Economics has two major objectives; it functions as a 
service department for other departments in the School of Business 
Administration, as well as the other schools of the university, and 
gives a specialized education to students majoring in economics. 

The major in economics offers a choice either a Bachelor of 
Science in Business Administration of a Bachelor of Arts. The 
former provides preparation for research or executive positions 
in business or government, whereas the latter is designed for stu- 
dents planning graduate studies. 

The economics major must take at least 24 required credit- 
hours of course in economics. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 
Major in Economics 

The following required courses are necessary for the Bachelor 
of Arts Economics Majors: EC 133, Principles of Economics I; 
EC 134, Principles of Economics II; EC 341, Macroeconomic 
Analysis; EC 342, Economic Thought; EC 340, Microeconomic 
Analysis; EC 410, Econometrice; EC 342, International Economics, 
and an elective offered by the Economics Department. 

An additional three credit hours will be earned by choosing an 
elective offered by any other department. 

Bachelor of Science Degree 
Major in Business Economics 

The following are the required courses for the Business Eco- 
nomics Majors: EC 133, Principles of Economics I; EC 134, Prin- 

160 



ciples of Economics II; EC 336, Money and Banking; EC 420, 
Applied Economics; EC 320, Mathematical Methods in Economics; 
EC 341, Microeconomic Analysis; EC 350, Economics of Labor Rela- 
tions; and an elective offered in the Economics Department. 



Requirements for the minor in Economics 

The following concentration of courses is required for the Minor 
in Economics: EC 133, Principles of Economics I; EC 134, Prin- 
ciples of Economics II, EC 312, Contemporary Economic Problems; 
EC 342 Economic Thought; EC 345, Comparative Economic Sys- 
tems; and QA 216, Statistics. 



Courses in Economics 

EC 133 Principles of Economic I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Foundations of economic analysis, including economic progress; 
resources, technology, private enterprise, profits and the price sys- 
tem. Macroeconomics including national income, employment and 
economic growth. Price levels, money and banking, the Federal 
Reserve System, theory of income, employment and prices, business 
cycles and problems of monetary, fiscal and stabilization policy. 

EC 134 Principles of Economics II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EC 133. Microeconomics including markets and mar- 
ket structure and the allocation of resources. The distribution of 
income, the public economy, the international economy and the 
current economic problems. 

EC 300 Economic History of the U.S. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Development of American economic life in the various stages of 
agriculture, trade, industry, finance and labor. Change of economic 
practices and institutions, particularly in business, banking and 
labor. The changing role of government. 

161 



EC 310 Principles of Economic Geography 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Distribution of resources, industries and population in relation to 
physical, economic and technological factors. Principles of economic 
location and regional development. 

EC 311 Government Regulation of Business 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133-134. An appraisal of public policy toward 
transportation, trusts, monopolies, public utilities and other forms 
of government regulation of economic activity. 

EC 312 Contemporary Economic Problems 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The course concerns selected current economic problems; inflation, 
unemployment, poverty in an affluent society, economic issues in 
health services, the economics of higher education, current issues in 
transportation and population. The purpose is to examine and to 
explore policies to cure these problems. 

EC 314 Public Finance 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133-134. Theory and practice of public taxation. 
The budgetary process at all levels of government. 

EC 315 Economics of Crime 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The application of basic economic concepts to such topics as the 
economic costs of crime, the costs of preventing crime, white collar 
crime, crimes against property, victimless crimes. 

EC 320 Mathematical Methods in Economics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 115 - M 116; or M 115 - M 127; or QA 118 - QA 128. 
Applications of various mathematical concepts and techniques in 
macroeconomic and microeconomic analysis. Special emphasis on 
the design and interpretation of mathematical models of economic 
phenomena. 

EC 336 Money and Banking 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133-134. Nature and functions of money, com- 
mercial banking system. Federal Reserve System and the Treasury, 
monetary theory, financial institutions, international financial re- 
lationships, history of money and monetary policy in the United 
States and current problems of monetary policy. 

162 



EC 340 Microeconomic Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133-134. Study of the determination of the prices 
of goods and production factors in a free market economy and the 
role of prices in the allocation of resources. 

EC 341 Macroeconomic Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133-134, and A 111. An investigation of the 
makeup of the national income and an analysis of the factors that 
enter into its determination; an examination of the roles of con- 
sumption, investment, government finance, and money influencing 
national income and output, employment, the price level and rate 
of growth; policies for economic stability and growth. 

EC 342 International Economics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133-134. The role, importance and currents of 
international commerce; the balance of international payments; 
foreign exchange and international finance; international trade 
theory; problems of balance of payments adjustment; trade restric- 
tions; international control of raw materials; economic development 
and foreign aid. 

EC 345 Comparative Economic Systems 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133-134. A comparative study of the economic 
organization, resource allocation, and growth problems of the 
United States, British and French economic systems and the eco- 
nomic systems of the U.S.S.R., Poland and Yugoslavia. 

EC 350 Economics of Labor Relations 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133-134. History of the union movement in the 
United States, union structure and government, problems of collec- 
tive bargaining, economics of the labor market, wage theories, 
unemployment, governmental policy and control and problems of 
security. 

EC 410 Econometrics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EC 320. The application of mathematical and statisti- 
cal methods to both micro- and macro-economic policy issues. 

163 



EC 420 Applied Economics Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133-134. A study of applied economics involves 
application of the tools of economic analysis to the real-life prob- 
lems of business firms, government agencies and other organiza- 
tions. 

EC 440 Economic Development 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133-134. Economic problems of developing coun- 
tries and the policies necessary to induce growth. Individual pro- 
jects required. 

EC 442 Economic Thought 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133-134. The development of economic doctrine 
from mercantilism and Adam Smith to the thinking of modern day 
theorists. Emphasis upon the main currents of thought with the 
applicability to present-day problems. Individual study and report- 
ing. 

EC 450 Thesis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A written report on a research project. No class meetings, but 
periodic conferences with the thesis supervisor. 



Concentration in Finance 

Chairman: Assistant Professor Jeffrey L. Williams, C.P.A., 

M.B.A., University of Bridgeport. 
Associate Professors: Henry Vasileff, Ph.D., University of 

Toronto; Kai K. Nordlund, D.S.J. , New York Law School. 
Assistant Professor: Robert M. Rainish, M.B.A., Bernard M. 

Baruch College 

Finance, as an area of study, is designed to promote an analjrti- 
cal appreciation of the financial system and the financial decision 
making process in which society through its individuals, business 
firms and governments, is continually engaged. In particular, the 
study of finance provides a structured analysis of the financial 
system and the financial decision making process as determinants 
of the economic wealth of the individual, the business firm and the 
nation. The study of finance enables the student to pursue the 
preparation required for a number of financial decision making 

164 



positions in government and industry including the entire variety 
of financial institutions. 

Given the broad scope of finance and the financial decision 
making process, the Department of Finance provides a comprehen- 
sive offering of courses at both the graduate and undergraduate 
levels of study. The graduate course offerings may be selected to 
comprise a concentration in finance by the student pursuing the 
Master of Business Administration degree. The undergraduate 
course offerings enable the student seeking the Bachelor of Science 
in Business Administration to obtain either a major or minor in 
finance by satisfying the following requirements. 



Requirement for the major 

The finance major is required to complete at least 39 semester 
hours of course work including 2 1 in finance, 9 in economics, 6 in 
accounting and 3 in quantitative analysis. In addition to the basic 
principles course (FI 113), the finance major is required to complete 
a varied selection of 18 semester hours (FI 214, FI 229, FI 230, FI 
325, FI 341 and FI 345); in finance courses, coupled with course 
work in economics (EC 314, EC 336 and EC 445), in accounting (A 
221 and A 222) and quantitative analysis (QA 333). 



Requirement for the minor 

A total of 18 semester hoiu-s of course work is required for 
completion of a minor concentration in finance. The recommended 
coursework includes FI 113, FI 229, FI 230, FI 341 and FI 345 from 
finance, and either EC 314 or EC 336 from economics. However, 
students seeking specialized coursework can select, with the assis- 
tance of a finance advisor, alternative combinations of courses. 



Courses in Finance 

FI 113 Business Finance 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: A 112 and EC 133. An introduction to the principles 
of finance management and the impact of the financial markets and 
institutions on that managerial function. An analjrtical emphasis 
will be placed upon the tools and techniques of the investment, 

165 



financing and dividend decision. In addition, the institutional as- 
pects of financial markets, including a description of financial in- 
struments, will be developed. 

FI 214 Principles of Real Estate 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: FI 113. An introduction to the fundamentals of real 
estate practice and the essentials of the various aspects of the real 
estate business. Emphasis will be placed on brokerage, mortgage 
financing, investments, management and valuation relative to 
commercial and industrial real estate. 

FI 227 Risk and Insurance 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: FI 113. An examination and evaluation of risk in 
business affairs and the appropriate methods for handling them 
from the viewpoint of the business firm. Emphasis will be placed on, 
and extended consideration devoted to, the various forms of insur- 
ance coverage. 

FI 229 Corporate Financial Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: FI 113 and QA 216. A comprehensive analysis of the 
structure of optimal decisions relative to the functional areas of 
corporate financial decision making. Emphasis is placed upon de- 
veloping an understanding of the applications and limitations of 
decision models for the investment, financing and dividend deci- 
sions of the corporation. Topics include: firm valuation, capital 
budgeting, risk analysis, cost of capital, capital structure and work- 
ing capital management. 

FI 230 Investment Analysis and Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: FI 113 and QA 216. An analysis of the determinants 
of valuation for common stocks, preferred stocks, bonds, convertible 
bonds and preferred stock, stock warrants and puts and calls. Em- 
phasis will be placed on the analytical techniques of security 
analysis, portfolio analysis and portfolio selection. 

FI 325 International Finance 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: FI 113. An introduction to the theory and determina- 
tion of foreign exchange rates, mechanisms of adjustment to bal- 
ance of payments disturbance, fixed vs. flexible exchange rates. The 
international reserve supply mechanism and proposals for reform of 
the international monetary system. 

166 



FI 345 Financial Institutions and Capital Markets 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: FI 113 and QA 216. An examination of the relation- 
ship between the financial system and the level, growth and stabil- 
ity of economic activity. Emphasis will be placed upon the theory, 
structure and regulation of financial markets and institutions, 
coupled with the role of capital market yields as the mechanism that 
allocates savings to economic investment. 



Courses in Business Law 

LA 101 Business Law I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Contract law as a foundation for anticipating legal difficulties and 
making the best use of legal advice. Functional and policy problems 
in the legal resolution of a controversy. The origin and development 
of common, statutory and constitutional law and of the functioning 
of the judicial system. 

LA 102 Business Law II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: LA 101. Agencies, partnerships, corporations and 
legal aspects of marketing. 

LA 221 Law of Sales 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: LA 102. This course is an advanced study of Business 
Law comprising: bailments; duties and liabilities of bailees, com- 
mon carriers, and warehousemen; the laws governing the rights 
of parties engaged in the transfer of personal property. Questions of 
title, risks assumed, rights of creditors, express and implied war- 
ranties, buyers and sellers remedies, together with the business 
background out of which such relations arise, are all considered. 

LA 222 Law of Commercial Paper and Bankruptcy 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: LA 221. This course is a study of the Negotiable In- 
struments Law, dealing with negotiable promissory notes, bills 
of exchange, and bank credits with an analysis of their form and 
function in commercial transactions. A brief survey of bankruptcy 
procedure under the federal bankruptcy laws is included. 

167 



Department of Hotel, Restaurant 
Management, Tourism and Travel 

Chairman: Assistant Professor John R. Coleman, Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts 

Assistant Professor: Francis P. McGee Jr., M.P.A., Syracuse Uni- 
versity; Ronald Wentworth, M.S. I.E. University of Massa- 
chusetts 

Hotel Management 

Many personally and financially rewarding careers are avail- 
able in the growing field of hotel management. Currently there are 
about 65,000 hotels and motels in the United States employing 
more than 700,000 people, figures which keep increasing as more 
and more people travel. 

Requirements for the major 

This concentration requires 30 hours of study in hotel ad- 
ministration, food and beverage control, front office procedures, 
properties management, laws of innkeeping and hotel systems and 
operations. Elective courses such as layout and design and hospital- 
ity promotion are also offered. On the-job-training is received 
through an internship program. Culmination of the program is the 
Seminar in Hotel Management. 



Restaurant Management 

The food service industry today is the fourth largest in the 
United States, employing over 2.5 million people. It represents a 
wide variety of career opportunities in management and ownership, 
an opportunity to work with the public. 



Requirements for the major 

In early semesters, the student is introduced to basic business 
courses as well as introductory hospitality industry courses. In 
succeeding semesters, the emphasis is shifted to courses related to 
the hospitality industry and geared to meet the needs and interests 
of the student. 

168 



Tourism and Travel 

Tourism is a major national resource for many nations. Travel 
patterns and transportation often affect the construction and de- 
velopment of new facilities. Most countries and states have major 
programs designed to expand tourism within their boundaries. 

The tourism and travel major studies the growth of the travel 
industry and the effects of increased leisure time on the industry. 
The history, routes, equipment and development of national and 
international carriers are studied along with the application of 
scientific methods of management to a complex international busi- 
ness. 



Requirements for the major 

In the curriculum, international economics, geography and the 
social and cultural patterns that have shaped the development of 
the travel and tourism industry are closely examined. The concen- 
tration of 12 semester hours in travel and tourism offers an intro- 
duction to the field through the study of cultural tourism, the 
economic role of tourism and its development, the sociology of 
tourism and tourism components and supply. 



Courses in Hotel Management 

HM 101 Laws of Inn-Keeping 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: LA 101 or instructor's permission. Historical de- 
velopment of the common inn. The peculiarities of the inn-keeper- 
guest relationship are stressed. Responsibility of inn-keeper and 
use of inn-keeper's lien is emphasized. 

HM 103 Principles of Hotel Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Introduces the student to hotel and restaurant operations. History 
of the industry with special emphasis on current trends. Various 
operations within the industry are analyzed. 

HM 104 Procedures and Techniques in Hotel Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The administrative and management procedures and techniques of 
planning, control, and personnel in the hospitality area. 

169 



HM 150 Management Decision Making 
(Production Management) 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. Presents the current methods 
and principles of food production as practiced by the food service 
industry. Quality control, portion and cost control, menu planning 
are emphasized. 

HM 165 Tourism 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Introduces to the student the numerous aspects of tourism as re- 
lated to the hotel-motel industry. Foreign and domestic tourism and 
business travel are all reviewed. 

HM 166 Touristic Geography 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: HM 165. A course examining the development of the 
touristic areas of every major travel destination. To what areas are 
travelers journeying and what developments are taking place on a 
world wide basis to attract an increasing number of tourists, 
whether individuals, pleasure groups or business conventions. 

HM 201 Front Office Administration 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. To make the student aware of 
the work flow connected with front office procedures. The prepara- 
tion of the night audit is stressed. The student is introduced to the 
art of Inn-Keeping. 

HM 267 Shipping and Cruises 

An analysis of shipping from its earliest developments, including its 
effects on intra-regional and international communications. A 
study of the passenger liner and its emergence as a total vacation 
entity. The growth of the cruise industry and its intra-relationship 
with airlines, hotel and tour operators. 

HM 268 Land Transportation 

An examination of the effects of rail transportation throughout the 
world, including migration, trade, travel trends, development of 
hotels and resorts in the Americas, Europe, Australia, Africa and 
the Pacific. The steady growth of automotive transportation, both 
coach and automobile, is also examined along with its effect on the 
scope of world travel patterns. 

170 



HM 302 Purchasing and Control 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. Introduction to the purchas- 
ing, receiving and issuing of food and beverages. The identification 
of grades and specifications determining quality of purchased items 
is emphasized. Cost control procedures are stressed. 

HM 321 Principles of Hotel and Restaurant Administration 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MG 125. Practices and systems used in hotels and 
restaurants. Controls, use and interpretation of financial state- 
ments. All operations and specialized industry procedures. 

HM 322 Markets and Promotion of Public Services 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MK 105. Aspects of the services market with em- 
phasis on consumer behavior. Internal and external stimulation of 
sales in competitive and non-competitive markets, and the vagaries 
of environmental concept. Experimental techniques embodied in 
industry sponsored sales-blitz activities. 

HM 325 Food and Beverage Control 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Current methods and principles of food and beverage storage, ser- 
vice, merchandising, issuing, as practiced by the hospitality indus- 
try. Phases covered on a rotating basis include menu planning, 
employee training, advertising and promotion, wine-cellar opera- 
tion, music and entertainment, pre-cost procedures, payroll 
analysis. 

HM 369 Travel Agency Management 

A study of the travel business defining the functions of the retail 
travel agent and the wholesale tour operator. The distinction be- 
tween the two entities and their interrelationship within the 
framework of the industry. Also examined is their relationship with 
the principals of the travel industry and the traveling public. 

HM 370 The Airline Industry 

A study of the present and future role and impact of the airline 
industry within the framework of the travel industry principals — 
the hotels, the steamship lines, the railways, automobile/coach 
companies, and tour operators. Includes an examination of the role 
of regulatory bodies in the airline industry in light of the growth 
and the future of the airlines. 

171 



HM 410 Hotel Systems and Operations 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. Analysis and evaluation of 
hotel systems and operations. Emphasis on analytical techniques, 
systems, computer-assisted operations, and ch£inge-induced prob- 
lems. 

HM 411 Equipment, Layout, and Design 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The concept of building management is presented as demonstrating 
the interdependence of planning, construction, equipment, mainte- 
nance, personnel and on-premise customer. Develop layout studies, 
design equipment, estimate budget. 

HM 512 Seminar in Hotel Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A rigorous examination of competing concepts of the role of the 
service organization in society. An integrative course relating the 
individual operation to the production schedule, merchandising, 
environment and the various economic stresses. 

HM 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
With permission from the Chairman of the Department of Hotel and 
Restaurant Administration, students may engage in independent 
research projects and other approved phases of independent study. 



Concentration in 
International Business 

Chairman: Associate Professor John Kakalik, Ph.D., Michigan 
State University. 

Associate Professor: Satish Chandra, J.S.D., Yale University. 

Assistant Professor: Kevin McCrohan, M.B.A., Baruch College. 

International business is an interdisciplinary program which 
draws on areas of marketing, management, finance and economics 
in order to develop a multinational perspective on contemporary 
business opportunities throughout the world. It deals with the prob- 
lems of developing and adapting business practices for the purpose 
of operating within different economies, different political systems 
and different cultures. 

172 



A background in international business prepares the student 
for careers in both the private and public sectors, as well as in 
international non-profit institutions. 



Requirements for the international business major 

The major must take 27 credits in international business 
courses. International Business (IB 312), International Economics 
(EC 342), International Marketing Management (IB 313) and Com- 
parative Management (IB 415) are required of all majors. The 
remaining courses are to be selected after consultation with an 
advisor. 



Courses In International Business 

IB 312 International Business 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Analysis of business environments, with special emphasis on 
similarities and differences between the nations of the world, and 
views toward developing intercultural managerial effectiveness. 

IB 321 Operations of the Multinational Corporation 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Specific problems encountered by multinational firms. Topics in- 
clude investment decisions, planning and control and the social 
responsibilities of firms in host nations. 

IB 549 International Business Policy 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: MK 413, FI 325, MG 415. Identification and relation 
of the elements involved in the dynamics of a company and its inter- 
national environment through case analysis. 



Department of Marketing 

Chairman: Associate Professor John Kakalik, Ph.D., Michigan 
State University. 

Associate Professors: Satish Chemdra, J.S.D., Yale University; 
Bernard Weiner, M.B.A., New York University; Ruth 
Yanover, M.A., University of Wisconsin. 

173 



Assistant Professor: Kevin McCrohan, M.B.A., Baruch College. 

Marketing focuses on a set of business activities which controls 
the flow of goods and services from producers to consumers. As such, 
it is typically viewed as a business discipline. In addition, market- 
ing concepts are widely applied to non-profit institutions, gov- 
ernmental agencies, political campaigns, hospitals and various so- 
cial organizations. 

The study of marketing includes both societal and managerial 
perspectives. Managerial emphasis is placed heavily on the coordi- 
nation of product, promotion, price, and distribution policies that 
are designed to relate the firm to its competitive environment. 
Societal dimensions include issues in consumer protection, legal 
and social responsibilities of the firm, and analysis of marketing's 
contribution to the total society. 

Individual coursework is primarily designed to prepare majors 
for a career in business. Students may specialize in such areas as 
advertising, sales, logistics, and marketing research. 



Requirements for the Marketing Major 

A minimum of 30 credit hours is required for a marketing 
major. Principles of Marketing, MK 105; International Business, IB 
312; Marketing Management, MK 315; and Marketing Research, 
MK 342, are required of all majors. The balance of the program 
consists of six or more additional courses to be selected after consul- 
tation with an advisor. 



Courses in Marketing 

MK 105 Principles of Marketing 

Prerequisite: EC 133. The fundamental functions of marketing 
involving the flow of goods and services from producers to consum- 
ers. Marketing methods of promotion, pricing, product decisions 
and distribution channels. 

MK 205 Analysis of the Buyer 

Prerequisite: MK 105. A study of the principle comprehensive mar- 
keting models which focus on customer decision processes. Topics 
include brand switching decisions, measures of media effectiveness 
and test market techniques. 

174 



MK 302 Industrial Marketing 

Prerequisite: MK 105. Practices and policies in the distribution of 
industrial goods, including purchasing, market analysis, channels 
of distribution, pricing, competitive practices and operating costs. 

MK 307 Advertising and Promotion 

Prerequisite: MK 105. The design, management, and evaluation of 
the various communications programs involved in marketing and 
public relations. 

MK 316 Sales Management 

Prerequisite: MK 105. The management of a sales organization. 
Including recruiting, selecting, training, supervision, and compen- 
sation of sales personnel. 

MK 413 International Marketing Management 

Prerequisites: IB 312, MK 105. Applied marketing decision making 
in international firms. The development of marketing strategy and 
techniques in foreign markets. 

MK 442 Marketing Research and Information Systems 

Prerequisite: MK 105, QA 118, Junior standing. Research as a 
component of the marketing information system. Research design, 
sampling methods, data interpretation, and management of the 
marketing research function. 

MK 460 Consumer Protection 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. The socio-legal framework within 
which consumers make purchase decisions. The focal point of the 
course is to develop an analytical framework for evaluating the 
informational needs of consumers and consistent regulatory 
policies. 

MK 470 Business Logistics 

Prerequisites: MK 105, QA 118, Junior standing. The design and 
administration of systems to control physical product flows. Both 
spatial and temporal constraints are treated in the development of 
transportation, warehousing, and manufacturing systems. 

MK 515 Marketing Management 

Prerequisites: MK 105, MK 442, Senior standing. The analysis, 
planning, and control of the marketing effort within the firm. Em- 
phasis is on case analysis. 

175 



Courses in Retailing 

RT 121 Introduction to Retailing 

Prerequisite: MK 105. Introductory survey course of the problems 
and opportunities in the retail distribution field, including a basic 
understanding of bujdng, selling and promotion for the retail con- 
sumer market. 

RT 212 Textiles 

Prerequisite: RT 121. An indepth study of the technical make-up of 
fabrics, their design, and their application for the future. Emphasis 
is placed on fabric knowledge interpreted in actual design and 
production situations. 

RT 215 Retail Credit Management 

Prerequisite: RT 121. An overview of the forces of credit as they 
apply to stimulating the retailing scene. A philosophical and opera- 
tional approach to the uses of credit together with the respon- 
sibilities and limitations that it imposes on both the grantor and the 
grantee. 

RT 218 Fashions in Retailing 

Prerequisite: RT 121. The history of fashion design in both apparel 
and home furnishings with emphasis on the relationship of the past 
to the present and to the future possibilities of esthetics in mer- 
chandise. Emphasis is placed on understanding what has happened 
so that intelligent evaluations of future events in the area of design 
may be predicted. 

RT 309 Retail Advertising and Sales Promotion 

Prerequisite: RT 121. Intensive review of techniques of retail sales 
promotion, including newspaper, magazine, radio, television, and 
direct mail. Great emphasis placed on store imagery and its appro- 
priateness in a variety of marketing situations. Stress placed on a 
review of current advertising campaigns by major retail organiza- 
tions. 

RT 310 Retail Merchandise Management 

Prerequisite: RT 121. A total review of the profit and loss aspect of 
retailing. The fundamentals of achieving total management per- 
formance in the retail field. The central course in the retail cur- 
riculum. Required for every retailing major. 

RT 313 Retail Buying 

Prerequisite: RT 121. Modern technical evaluation of the highly 
specialized field of purchasing merchandise for resale at the retail 
level, including study and evaluation of the differing techniques 

176 



employed by department stores, chain stores, discount stores, and 
independent merchants. A total review of the techniques of mer- 
chandise buying in all product categories. 

Department of 
Management Science 

Chairman: Associate Professor Wilfred R. Harricharan, Ph.D., 
Cornell University. 

Associate Professors: Irloin Greenberg, Ph.D., New York Uni- 
versity; Shiv Sawhney, Ph.D., New York University. 

Assistant Professors: Gene Brady, Ph.D., University of Oregon; 
Frank K. Flaumenhaft, M.B.A., New York University; Louis 
Silbert, M.B.A., University of Hartford; Ronald N. Went- 
worth, M.S., University of Massachusetts; Paul M. Zingale, 
M.A., University of Minnesota; William Pan, Ph.D., Columbia 
University. 

At a time in history when all of man's systems — governmental, 
technological, societal, educational, industrial, and military as well 
as business — are becoming more sophisticated and complex, the 
need for skilled managers has never been greater. As automation 
frees man from having to deal directly with materials, and the 
computer frees him from the burden of processing data, man is able 
to direct his energies to supervision, administration, control and 
planning: the four major functions of management. 

The Department of Management Science seeks to provide stu- 
dents with the foundations of knowledge and skill necessary for 
moving to positions of responsibility in management. The theories 
and methods of analyzing decisions which are studied also prepare 
students for entry level jobs, as well as sharpening the skills of those 
already holding organizational positions. The underlying concept is 
to combine adequate specialization with the integrative point of 
view required of the manager. 

The Department of Management Science offers degree pro- 
grams in six areas of specialization: an Associate in Science degree 
program in Business Administration, and Bachelor of Science de- 
gree programs in Business Administration, Business Data Process- 
ing, Management Science, Operations Management and Personnel 
Management/Industrial Relations. 

The Department of Management Science sponsors a student 
chapter of the Society for the Advancement of Management (SAM) 

177 



which is open to students interested in the art and science of profes- 
sional management. The student chapter of SAM provides students 
and faculty with a professional and social experience that cannot be 
found in the classroom. Speakers, films, discussion groups and other 
activities are scheduled and are open to all those interested in 
attending. 

The Institute of Management Sciences (TIMS) is also rep- 
resented in the department, although no formal campus chapter has 
been chartered. 



Business Administration 

In order to function effectively in a variety of management 
situations, an administrator should be conversant with all major 
areas of management. Moreover, he should have a thorough under- 
standing of the interrelationships which exist among the different 
functional groups within organizations. This point of view is essen- 
tial for a manager who is to participate effectively with others in the 
administrative group and who is to administer activities in his area 
of responsibility in the best interests of the entire organization. 



Degree Requirements 

Associate in Science Degree 

Sixty credit hours of required courses in the areas of business 
and the arts and sciences are necessary for the awarding of the 
Associate in Science degree. This program of study is referred to as 
"the business core" for students in a baccalaureate program. 



Degree Requirements 

Bachelor of Science Degree 

The business core plus 60 additional credit hours of advanced 
level business courses and electives are required for the Bachelor 
of Science degree. A student wishing to major in business adminis- 
tration should consult with his advisor to develop a specific plan 
of study for the degree. 

178 



Degree Requirements 
Business Data Processing 

Management use of quantitative methods has been increas- 
ingly reinforced by the application of high speed computer technol- 
ogy and techniques in organizations. The advances in simulation, 
mathematical programming, decision theory and computer control 
of systems have generated a need for personnel well trained in both 
the management sciences and the computer and information sci- 
ences. 

Degree Requirements 

Bachelor of Science Degree 

The degree program in business data processing is a unique 
blend of management science and computer science. One hundred 
twenty credit hours are required for the degree. The business core 
plus advanced courses in business and information systems pro- 
vide a thorough education. A student wishing to major in business 
data processing should consult with his advisor to develop a specific 
plan of study for the degree. 



Management Science 

The purpose of this major is to make available to the student a 
program that combines classical education in organizational man- 
agement with modern training in quantitative methods. The fun- 
damental assumption on which the program is based is that it is 
desirable for a student to acquire a knowledge of the content of 
business and management with literacy and experience in the areas 
of quantitative techniques. 



Degree Requirements 

One hundred twenty credit hours consisting of the business 
core, plus 60 credit hours of advanced management courses and 
electives are required for the Bachelor of Science degree. Advanced 
work in management consists of case analysis, small group discus- 

179 



sions, seminars, simulation exercises ("management games"), and 
field studies in actual organizations. A student wishing to major 
in management science should consult with his advisor to develop 
a specific plan of study for the degree. 



Operations Management 

The major in operations management develops the manage- 
ment skills required to analyze, design, implement and control 
operating systems in a variety of organizations, both profit and 
nonprofit. The curriculum provides the student with a working 
knowledge of the nature and function of operating systems and 
emphasizes the use of systems analysis techniques in their man- 
agement. 



Degree Requirements 

One hundred twenty credit hours, consisting of the business 
core plus 60 credit hours of advanced courses in the management 
sciences, production management and electives are required for the 
Bachelor of Science degree. A study wishing to major in operations 
management should consult with his advisor to develop a specific 
plan of study for the degree. 



Personnel Management/Industrial Relations 

The major responsibility of personnel management is to at- 
tract, develop and retain qualified personnel for the organization. 
The major applies the researches of the behavioral and social sci- 
ences in manpower planning, personnel selection, compensation 
motivation, planning adjustment to change and developing organi- 
zational performance. Industrial relations examines the organiza- 
tion of workers and union-management negotiations. Majors in this 
field study established and developing systems for the resolution of 
conflict and the building of viable, accommodative relationships 
between employers and employees. Emphasis is placed upon the 
interaction of labor, management and the government in establish- 
ing wages, hours and conditions of work. The approach is keyed to 
an institutional analysis of collective manpower problems and is- 
sues within an economic and organizational framework. 

180 



Degree Requirements 

One hundred twenty credit hours consisting of the business 
core, plus 60 credit hours of additional courses at the advanced level 
in management, industrial engineering, industrial psychology 
and electives are required for the Bachelor of Science degree. A 
student wishing to major in personnel management/industrial 
relations should consult with his advisor to develop a specific plan 
of study for the degree. 



Courses in Management Science 

MG 125 Management and Organization 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Management systems are studied as they apply to all organizations. 
Emphasized is the universality of managerial functions. Princi- 
ples of management and the quantitative and behavioral aspects of 
the process of management. 

MG 200 Business Systems Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. A survey 
of the use and application of systems analysis to examine problems 
of business enterprises, both profit and non-profit. Topics include 
the origins of systems analysis, the basic concepts of systems, the 
elements of systems and the systems approach. 

MG 205 EDP Communication and Documentation 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. This 
course will provide the necessary skills for documenting computer 
software packages. Emphasis will be on a comparative review of 
documentation methods, systems and standards now being used by 
data processing installations, including the design and preparation 
of program and system user manuals. 

MG 231 Industrial Relations 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. The industrial relations and person- 
nel management systems of the organization are surveyed. An 
integrated behavioral, quantitative and systems approach permits 
a synthesis of: manpower planning-forecasting-information; labor 
marketing; selection-placement; training-development; compensa- 

181 



tion; leadership; government-employer relations; and labor- 
management relations. 

MG 317 Small Business Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. This course is designed to enable the 
student who is considering a career of self-employment to examine 
realistically some of the characteristics, opportunities, risk-taking 
and decision making in new business, new enterprises or self- 
employment ventures. 

MG 324 Development of Management Thought 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MG 125. In-depth study of the evolution of modern 
management and organization theory in order to develop a histori- 
cal perspective of management thought. Research in the field will 
be analyzed as to its applicability to current practices. 

MG 350 Advanced Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MG 125. This course is designed to reinforce the prac- 
tices and principles of management to which the student has been 
exposed in management and organization. It also serves as a basis 
for applying management practices to the functional areas. As an 
intermediate course, it will require the student to pursue current 
research and readings dealing with management functions. Em- 
phasis on the human factor in organizations. 

MG 400 Management Planning and Control Systems 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Exami- 
nation of current concepts, techniques and working practices neces- 
sary to develop and install a system for management planning and 
control. Emphasis will be on the development of tools for systematic 
planning and control, such as PERT, CPM, and other network 
analysis systems. Computer-assisted decision making concepts will 
be examined. 

MG 415 Comparative Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IB 312, MG 125. The analysis and examination of 
business behavior and organizations against a background of 
diversified cultural systems. 

182 



MG 449 Independent Study 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Independent study to be performed in a project of interest to the 
student and under direction of a faculty member to be designated by 
the department chairman. Project, student and faculty director 
must be approved by both the management science department 
chairman and the dean of the business school prior to registration. 

MG 450-454 Special Studies in Business 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. Special studies in business ad- 
ministration and public administration. These classes may take 
any one of the following forms: study and analysis of specific prob- 
lems within units of business or government and application of 
theory to these problem areas; programs of research related to the 
student's specific discipline; or special projects. Several sections 
may run concurrently. 

MG 455 Managerial Effectiveness 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: MG 350, MG 324. Examination of the current prac- 
tices used in the identification and development of effective manag- 
ers. The problems of the organizational environment in which the 
manager operates are identified; approaches used to alleviate these 
problems and develop organizational and managerial effectiveness 
are studied. 

MG 460 Information Systems for Operations 
and Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. The steps 
necessary for the successful design and implementation of an inte- 
grated information system, which can benefit all levels of manage- 
ment, are developed through analysis of information requirements, 
design approaches, processing methods, data management and con- 
trol of operations. Organizational and social implications of 
computer-oriented information systems are discussed with em- 
phasis on the proper level of management involvement and an 
understanding of the manager/computer interaction. Emphasis is 
also placed on planning and control systems, economics of informa- 
tion, critical behavior aspects of decision systems and the role of 
analytical and simulation models and the computer in decision 
making. 

183 



MG 489 Internship Practicum 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department 
chairman. This program provides monitored field experience with 
business and industry, subject to academic guidance and review. 

MG 512 Contemporary Issues in Business and Society 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing. A rigorous examination of competing 
concepts of the role of business in society. A capstone, integrative 
course relating the firm to its environment. Issues arising from 
aggregate social, political, legal and economic factors are stressed. 

MG 515 Management Seminar 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: MG 324, MG 350, MG 455. The course will 
familiarize the students with contemporary publications and the 
findings of research studies reports. The focus of instruction will be 
to analyse, interpret and determine the impact of these publications 
and research findings on the theory and practice of management. 

MG 550 Business Policy 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing. Policies for the organization are 
examined from the viewpoint of top-level executives. Develops 
analytical frameworks for achieving the goals of the total organiza- 
tion. Integrates the student's general business knowledge with the 
required business administration courses. Emphasizes oral and 
written skills by the discussion of cases. 

MG 556 Operations Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
This course encompasses the design, implementation, operation 
and control of productive enterprises, private or public, profit or 
non-profit. Emphasis is placed on the integration of system 
analysis, management, science, operations research and manage- 
ment and organizational theory in the management of operations. 

MG 560 Business Systems Simulation 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
This course concerns the design, development and application of 
computer simulation models as a tool of analysis for business, 
economic and electronic computer systems. GPSS and DYNAMO 
will be the principle simulation languages used. The course will 
examine methods for constructing deterministic and stochastic de- 
cision models and computer simulation models to examine many of 

184 



the practical, theoretical and philosophical problems which arise in 
constructing and implementing simulation experiments. 

Courses in Quantitative Analysis 

QA 118 Business Mathematics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
This course emphasizes basic mathematical techniques as they 
apply to business. Topics include: number systems; fractions and 
decimals; ratios, proportions, and percentages; functions; discount- 
ing, depreciation and depletion; simple and compound interest; 
investments and bonds; insurance concepts; and taxes. 

QA 128 Quantitative Techniques in Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: QA 118. This course places emphasis on more rigorous 
applications of quantitative techniques in business. Topics include: 
linear functions, systems of linear equations and inequalities, ma- 
trix algebra, graphical linear programming solutions, quadratic 
functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, probability con- 
cepts and probability theory. 

QA 216 Probability and Statistics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: QA 128 or equivalent. A course in elementary proba- 
bility and statistical concepts with emphasis on data analysis and 
presentation, frequency distributions, probability theory, probabil- 
ity distributions, sampling distributions, statistical inference, 
hypothesis testing, and the T, chi-square and F distributions. 

QA 250 Quantitative Techniques II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: QA 128. A course stressing advanced applications of 
quantitative techniques for the solution of business problems. To- 
pics include: sequences and limits; differential calculus and applica- 
tions; integral calculus and applications; linear programming — 
the simplex algorithm, duality, parametric programming and sen- 
sitivity analysis; expectations, decisions and games; discrete and 
continuous probability distributions; simulation and Monte Carlo 
techniques. 

QA 314 Field Research in Business and Government 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: MK 105 and QA 128. Methods of determining cus- 
tomer reaction to goods and services offered in the marketplace and 

185 



to business establishments. Topics include: the nature and rol 
sampling; characteristics of sampling procedures; design of san 
surveys; development of survey designs; procedures used in in 
viewing, tabulation, data analysis and presentation of rese£ 
results; and the appraisal of performance to be expected from sui 
designs. 

QA 333 Statistics II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: QA 216. A course stressing advanced statistical i 
cepts and statistical methods relating to business. Topics incli 
regression and correlation, multiple regression, analysis of 
iance (ANOVA), index numbers, time series analysis, seasonal 
cyclical variations and forecasting methods. 



Department of Public Administration ar 
Institutional Management 

Chairman: Assistant Professor Francis P. McGee Jr., M.I 
Syracuse University. 

Associate Professor: Gene F. Brady, Ph.D., University of Orej 

Assistant Professors: John R. Coleman, Ph.D., Universit 
Massachusetts. Jack Werblow, Ph.D., University of Cincinn 



Public Administration 

The public administration program is designed to prepare 
dents for public service responsibility as government program 
ministrators, civic leaders and managers of private busine 
deeply involved in governmental affairs. Stressed are the orgar 
tion of government services, the behavior of public officials, 
manner in which government raises revenue, the nature of pi 
personnel systems, the role of collective bargaining in the pi; 
sector, the manner in which decisions on public expenditures 
made and public administrative procedures. 

An understanding of public administration is also essentia 
people preparing for careers in law, journalism and every aspe 
business. Public administration training can be easily combi 
with highly specialized career programs at the University of 1 
Haven. 



186 



Public administration students are strongly encouraged to sys- 
tematically develop their public speaking, group discussion and 
writing skills through specialized instruction and as a part of their 
regular public administration course requirements. 

Requirements for the major 

Public administration majors must take basic courses such as 
Introduction to Public Administration, PA 101; Collective Bargain- 
ing in the Public Sector, PA 408; Public Administration Systems 
and Procedures, PA 302; and Administrative Law, PA 390. The 
balance of the program is tailored to the student's particular in- 
terests such as urban planning and management, health adminis- 
tration and personnel management. 



Requirements for the minor 

The public administration courses referred to as requirements 
for the major constitute the minor core. This core and two additional 
public administration courses which the student chooses constitute 
the minor. 



Institutional Management 

In the Institutional Management career field, opportunities 
are available in both private and public institutions in health and 
education. Students learn the basic skills for designing, analyzing 
and installing food service distribution systems, transportation 
and materials distribution systems, and other primary and ancil- 
lary service department and systems needs to provide the institu- 
tions services. Also include are facility planning and institutional 
planning. 

Requirements for the major 

Institutional management as a major includes courses in food 
service management, institutional methodology, budgeting, execu- 
tive housekeeping and materials and supplies management. 

Twelve semester hours of study of the organization, develop- 
ment and control of the operations of institutions, hospitals and 
schools are required in this interdisciplinary program. 

187 



Courses in Public Administration 

PA 101 Introduction to Public Administration 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The nature of and problems involved in the administration of public 
services at the Federal, state, regional and local levels. 

PA 302 Public Administration Systems and Procedures 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Stressed are the major staff management functions in government: 
planning, budgeting, scheduling and work analysis. 

PA 305 Institutional Budgeting and Planning 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Budgeting as an institutional planning tool, as a cost control device 
and as a program analysis mechanism is stressed. Attention is 
given to the salary expense budget, the revenue budget, the capital 
budget and the cash budget. 

PA 307 Urban and Regional Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Methods and analysis of decision-making related to urban and 
regional problems. Topics include housing, land use, economic de- 
velopment, transportation, pollution, conservation and urban re- 
newal. 

PA 308 Health Care Delivery Systems 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: PA 302 and QA 314. A comparative analysis of 
health care delivery systems and the application of systems 
analysis and design concepts for designing and evaluating health 
care delivery systems. 

PA 315 Metropolitan Planning 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Analysis of population and public expenditure, dis-economies of 
scale, development of new communities. Land-use controls, planned 
unit development and urban growth policy are discussed. State and 
Federal policies affecting urban growth are stressed. 

PA 316 Urban Housing 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Encompassed are the subjects of housing management, planning, 
finance and policy. Specific topics such as the provision of low- 
income housing, the use of mortgage insurance, interest subsidies, 
site planning, rent controls, code enforcement, mortgage markets 
and the rise in housing abandonment are stressed. 

188 



PA 320 Municipal Finance and Budgeting 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
This course involves the analysis of fiscal policy at the municipal 
level. The financing and budgeting of services and improvements by 
local government. 

PA 390 Administrative Law 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Suggested prerequisite: PS 332. The basic legal arrangement of 
administrative organization; rules governing the use of administra- 
tive powers; legal procedures for enforcement of executive respon- 
sibilities. 

PA 405 Public Personnel Practices 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Study of the civil service systems of the federal, state and local 
governments including a systematic review of the methods of re- 
cruitment, evaluation, promotion, discipline, control and removal. 

PA 408 Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Analysis of collective bargaining in the public sector, with emphasis 
on legislation pertaining to government employees. 

PA 449 Independent Study 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A project of interest to the student under the direction of a faculty 
member and approved by the department chairman prior to course 
registration. 

PA 490 Public Health Administration 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An examination of public health activities, including public health 
organization, environmental health, disease control, use of infor- 
mation systems and social services. 

PA 491 Public Health and Environmental Law 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The role of the law in public health and environmental protection. 
Emphasized are the legal tools and administrative techniques used 
in the enforcement and administration of public health and en- 
vironmental control policy. 

PA 512 Seminar in Public Administration 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing. Selected topics related to public ad- 
ministration are chosen. 

189 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Konstantine C. Lambrakis, Ph.D., Dean 
Bachelor of Science Degree 

Majors in: 

Civil Engineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 
Materials Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Computer Technology 

Associate in Science Degree 

Majors in: 

Engineering Science 
Engineering 
Aeronautical Technology 



Engineering 

The field of engineering offers a student bright career prospects 
in the future. Increasingly complex technology and the need to 
m£ike better use of the earth's dwindling resources, while still meet- 
ing the needs of a growing urban society, make the role of engineer- 

191 



ing important to society and rewarding to the engineer well trained 
to meet the challenges of the future. 

The School of Engineering at the University of New Haven 
offers both superb facilities and a superior faculty for training in the 
engineering field. The School of Engineering maintains close ties 
with business and industry in the area, a relationship that allows 
students to study practical applications of the theoretical knowl- 
edge learned in classroom and laboratory. 

The School of Engineering offers undergraduate programs 
leading to bachelor's degrees in civil, materials, electrical, industri- 
al, mechanical engineering and computer technology, Both the As- 
sociate in Science degree and the Bachelor of Science degree may be 
earned by full time study or by part time study in the Evening 
College. 



Associate in Science 

This program provides students with the first two years of a 
standard four-year engineering program. Since the University of 
New Haven's courses are fully accredited, the student will be in a 
position to transfer with advanced standing to the four-year 
bachelor's program, to the Evening College or to another institu- 
tion. Upon satisfactory completion of the prescribed two-year cur- 
riculum in any engineering major for the Bachelor of Science de- 
gree, graduates may receive the Associate in Science in Engineering 
Science degree. 



Interdisciplinary Programs 

The following programs offered in conjunction with the School 
of Business will be found in other sections of the catalog: 

Criminal Justice — Law Enforcement Administration major 
Criminal Justice — Correctional Administration major 
Business Administration — Operations Management major 

The following programs offered in conjunction with the School 
of Arts and Sciences will be found in other sections of the catalog: 

Occupational Safety and Hygiene 
Fire Science Technology 

In addition, students in a liberal arts or business major may 
elect a minor in an engineering discipline. It is also possible for 

192 



students majoring in engineering to elect a minor in other disci- 
plines. For details see the chairmen of the departments involved. 



Engineering Co-op Program 

A cooperative program offered by the School of Engineering is 
designed to give practical work experience in area industries to 
students working toward a bachelor's degree. With proper arrange- 
ment of courses, students are able to work two full semesters and 
still graduate in four years. Most students hold positions as assis- 
tant engineers or laboratory technicians and earn full-time wages 
while acquiring six semester hours of academic credit for their 
work. 

Because of the flexible nature of this program, a student major- 
ing in any area of engineering can sign up and complete degree 
requirements in either four or five years. Approximately 30 area 
companies take part in the engineering co-op program. 



Admission 

An applicant for admission to the engineering programs should 
be a graduate of a secondary school of approved standing and should 
present 15 acceptable units of secondary school work. These should 
include four units of English, two units of algebra, one of plane 
geometry, one half of trigonometry, and one unit each of physics and 
a second science. Deficiencies in English, mathematics, and/or sci- 
ence may be satisfied by summer school attendance, or by an exten- 
sion of the stated curriculum for one or two semesters chosen to fit 
the student's need. 

Satisfactory placement in tests covering scholastic aptitude, 
mathematics, and English, as given by the College Entrance 
Examination Board (S.A.T.) or American College Testing Program 
(A.C.T.), is required. 



Matriculation 

Students who have completed at least two semesters or equiva- 
lent (30 academic credit hours) with a minimum quality point ratio 
of 2.00 may apply for matriculation for the bachelor's degree. Ad- 
mission will be limited to applicants who have given evidence of 
capacity and motivation adequate for upper division work as deter- 

193 



mined by the chairman of the department. A cumulative quality 
point ratio of at least 2.00 is required in Bachelor of Science stu- 
dents' major field. 



Professional Accreditation 

The School of Engineering's civil, electrical, industrial and 
mechanical Engineering curricula are accredited by the Engineers' 
Council for Professional Development (ECPD). 



Bachelor of Science Program 
Core Freshman Year 

The bachelor of science program in the various engineering 
majors contains a common freshman year with minor variations in 
the sophomore year. Students in engineering should choose their 
major by the beginning of the sophomore year. Students who are 
accepted with deficiencies must remove them before entering the 
sophomore year. 

All students enrolled in the School of Engineering must take 
the following courses in their freshman year: English Composition, 
E 113; World Literature I, E 201; Mathematical Analysis I, M 115, 
and Calculus I, M 117, or M 117 and Calculus II, M 118, for those 
students sufficiently prepared; HS 121, the History of Science; ES 
107, Introduction to Engineering; Introduction to Computers, IE 
102; Mechanics, Heat, and Waves with laboratory, Ph 150; Intro- 
duction to General Chemistry, CH 103, or General Chemistry I, CH 
105, and CH 110, Environmental Chemistry; and PE 111-112, Phys- 
ical Education I and II, or PE 100, Living with Leisure, in their 
junior or senior year. 



Department of Civil Engineering 

Chairman: Associate Professor Ross M. Lanius, Jr., M.S., Univer- 
sity of Connecticut; Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Mas- 
sachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island. 

Professors: Richard A. Mann, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; 
Professional Engineer, Wisconsin. John C. Martin, M.E., Yale 
University; Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Colorado, New 
York, Pennsylvania, North Carolina. 

194 



Associate Professor: M. Hamdy Bechir, Sc.D., Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology. 

Assistant Professor: George R. Carson, M.S.C.E., Columbia Uni- 
versity; Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Massachusetts, 
New York, New Jersey; Landscape Architect, Connecticut; Land 
Surveyor, Massachusetts, Connecticut. 

Civil engineering deals with planning, designing and con- 
structing facilities serving mankind. These services are diversified 
and include the reduction of air and water pollution; transportation 
of man, materials and power; renewal of older sections of cities; 
development of new communities and development of water supply 
and power generating facilities. Providing these facilities requires 
construction of buildings, bridges, dams, harbors, highways, pipe 
and power lines, railroads and tunnels; all with the least distur- 
bance to the environment. 

A civil engineer must have a solid background in math, basic 
science, communication skills, engineering science, engineering 
design and humanities. The curriculum is designed to meet these 
basic criteria. 

The first two years are essentially common to all engineering 
disciplines and include math, basic sciences and communication 
skills. The junior year is common to all civil engineers and provides 
a basic background in engineering science. In the senior year, con- 
centrated engineering design courses are available in the environ- 
mental, structural, surveying and transportation fields. Through 
the senior project and independent study, an indepth study of a 
specialized field is available. Humanities are included at all levels. 
The curriculum is accredited by the Engineers' Council for Profes- 
sional Development. 

There is a student chapter of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers at the university. The chapter sponsors technical lec- 
tures, field trips and social activities. 

Requirements for the degree 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

A total of 128 to 132 credits is required for the Bachelor of 
Science degree in Civil Engineering. The freshman year curriculum 
is common to all engineering disciplines and has been stated previ- 
ously. 

Required courses include the following: in mathematics, M 118, 
Calculus II; M 203, Calculus III; M 204, Differential Equations; and 

195 



a technical elective in an advanced mathematics course. World 
Literature II, E 202, is required, as well as PH 205, Electromag- 
netism and Optics with Laboratory; IE 204, Engineering 
Economics; EC 133, Principles of Economics I; and, Basic Circuits/ 
Numerical Methods. 

Mechanical engineering courses are required £is listed: ME 101, 
Engineering Graphics; ME 204, Dynamics; and ME 301, Ther- 
modynamics I. 

Civil engineering courses are required as follows: CE 201, Stat- 
ics; CE 202, Mechanics of Materials I; CE 203, Elementary Survey- 
ing; CE 301, Transportation Engineering; CE 302, Building Con- 
struction; CE 312, Structural Analysis; CE 304, Soil Mechanics; CE 
306, Hydraulics; CE 315, Environmental Engineering and Sanita- 
tion; CE 317, Structural Design Fundamentals; CE 319, Civil En- 
gineering Laboratory; CE 407, Contracts and Specifications; and 
CE 501, Senior Project. 

Also required are one free elective, one elective in science, three 
technical electives, and two electives from the humanities or social 
sciences. 



Requirements for the minor 
Civil Engineering 

A total of 18 semester hours of work in civil engineering is 
required for a minor in civil engineering. 

The following are required courses: CE 203, Elementary Sur- 
veying; CE 301, Transportation Engineering; CE 302, Building 
Construction; also. Environmental Engineering and Sanitation, CE 
315; City Planning, CE 403; and Contracts and Specifications, CE 
407. 

Engineering majors may substitute other civil engineering 
courses for a minor. 



Courses in Civil Engineering 

CE 201 Statics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: PH 150 and M 118 (Note: M 118 may be taken 
concurrently). Composition and resolution of forces in two and three 
dimensions. Equilibrium of forces in stationary systems. Analysis 

196 



of trusses. Centroids and second moments of areas, distributed 
forces, friction, shear and bending moment diagrams. 

CE 202 Mechanics of Materials I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CE 201. Elastic behavior of structural elements under 
axial, flexural, and torsional loading. Stress in and deformation of 
members, including beams. Lectures supplemented with laboratory 
demonstrations . 

CE 203 Elementary Surveying 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Theory and practice of surveying measurements using tape, level 
and transit. Field practice in traverse surveys and leveling, 
traverse adjustment and area computations, adjustment of instru- 
ments, error analysis. 

CE 205 Statics and Strength of Materials 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: PH 150 and M 118 (M 118 may be taken concur- 
rently). This course is a study of force systems in equilibrium. Also, 
basic machine and structural elements under tensile compressive, 
bending and torsional loads are analyzed for strength (stress) and 
for deformation (strain). Laboratory work is included. This course is 
an alternate to CE 201 and CE 202 in those engineering programs 
requiring CE 205. 

CE 301 Transportation Engineering 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A study of planning, design and construction of transportation 
systems including highways, airports, railroads, rapid transit sys- 
tems and waterways. 

CE 302 Building Construction 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Initiation into the planning and anatomy of buildings, materials 
available and their uses, some principles of construction proce- 
dures, general estimating of costs and relative merits of various 
types of construction, 

CE 304 Soil Mechanics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 203 and CE 202. Structural composition of the 
earth's crust and the mechanics of its formation. Soil classifications 
and physical properties are related to the principles underljdng the 
behavior of soils subjected to various loading conditions. Sub- 
surface exploration and laboratory exercises. 

197 



CE 305 Highway Engineering 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CE 301 or permission. Study of traffic, methods of 
making traffic surveys, safety and accident records and methods of 
traffic control. Emphasis on planning of major highways, intersec- 
tions, and urban streets. Study of pavements, drainage and general 
administration and operation. 

CE 306 Hydraulics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: ME 204. The mechanics of fluids and fluid flow. Fluid 
statics, laminar and turbulent flow. Impulse and momentum. Flow 
in pipes and open channels. Orifices and weirs. 

CE 309 Structural Design — Timber 

Credit, IV2 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CE 202. Study of the structure of wood and its growth, 
preservation and fire protection. The analysis and design of struc- 
tural members of timber including columns, beams, tension mem- 
bers, trusses and connections. Study of laminated members. 

CE 310 Structural Design — Masonry 

Credit, IVi semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CE 202. The structural design and analysis of brick 
and concrete masonry structures including unreinforced and rein- 
forced load bearing walls. 

CE 311 Structural Design — Timber and Masonry 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CE 202. This is a combination of CE 309 and CE 310. 

CE 312 Structural Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CE 202 and IE 102. This course presents basic struc- 
tural engineering topics on the analysis and design of structures. 
Topics studied are load criteria and influence lines; force and deflec- 
tion analysis of beams and trusses; analysis of indeterminate struc- 
tures by approximate methods, superposition and moment distribu- 
tion. Familiarization with framing systems will be gained by study- 
ing existing structures. 

CE 315 Environmental Engineering and Sanitation 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Introduction into hydrology; population and water demand projec- 
tions; water and wastewater transport systems. Problems concern- 
ing public health, water and wastewater treatment, solid waste 

198 



disposal, air pollution, and private water supply and sanitary dis- 
posal systems. 

CE 316 Code Indoctrination 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Study of codes and regulations prepared and enacted for the public 
and employee safety along with codes and regulations imple- 
mented to develop a uniform and balanced land development and 
usage program. A review of the legal control and administration 
of such codes as the Uniform Building Code, Life Safety Code, 
health codes, Occupational Safety and Health Code, labor laws, 
zoning regulations, planning regulations, wetlands regulations 
will be covered during the study of codes. 

CE 317 Structural Design Fundamentals 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CE 312, which may be taken concurrently, or permis- 
sion, and IE 102. Fundamentals of structural behavior of members, 
connections and structural systems made of steel, concrete, timber 
and other materials. Effect on members of a variety of loading 
conditions varying from dead load through overloads producing 
failure. 

CE 318 Route Surveying 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CE 203. A continuation of elementary surveying cov- 
ering principles of route surveying, stadia surveys, triangulation, 
trilateration, aerial photography, adjustment of instruments, field 
problems related to classwork and computer application to survey- 
ing problems. 

CE 319 Civil Engineering Laboratory 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Second semester Junior status. Experiments and 
laboratory investigations covering the fields of steel, concrete, soils, 
water and non-destructive testing. Emphasis placed on organiza- 
tion, representative sampling, testing technique, sources of error 
and presentation of data. Laboratory Fee: $8.00 

CE 320 Civil Engineering Practice 

Credit, 1 semester hour. 
Prerequisite: Second semester junior or first semester senior status. 
Students are exposed to the phase of actual engineering projects by 
visiting an engineering office during the semester on a regular 
schedule. 

199 



CE 401 Foundation Design and Construction 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CE 304 or permission. Application of soil mechanics to 
foundation design, stability, settlement. Selection of foundation 
type — shallow footings, deep foundations, pile foundations, mat 
foundations. Subsurface exploration. 

CE 402 Water Supply and Power 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CE 306 and CE 315. Study of principles of water 
resources engineering including surface and ground water hydrol- 
ogy. Design of water supply, flood control and hydroelectric reser- 
voirs. Hydraulics and design of water supply distribution and 
drainage collection systems including pump and turbine design. 
Principles of probability concepts in the design of hydraulic struc- 
tures. Study of water and pollution control laws. 

CE 403 City Planning 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Engineering, social economics, political and legal aspects of city 
planning. Emphasis placed on case studies of communities in Con- 
necticut. Zoning. Principles and policies of redevelopment. 

CE 404 Sanitary Engineering 

Credit, 3 semester horn's. 
Prerequisites: CE 306, CE 315 and IE 102. Study of physical, chemi- 
cal, biological and bacteriological aspects of water quality and pol- 
lution control. Study of unit processes and operations of water and 
waste water treatment including industrial waste and sludge pro- 
cessing. Design of water treatment and sewage treatment systems 
including sludge treatment and incineration. General construction 
and operation of treatment plants. 

CE 405 Indeterminate Structures 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: ME 307 or CE 312. The analysis of statically indeter- 
minate structures. Topics include approximate methods, moment 
distribution, conjugate beam, energy methods, influence lines and 
an introduction to matrix methods. 

CE 407 Contracts and Specifications 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Principles of contract formation, execution and termination. Study 
of specifications and practice in their preparation. Other legal mat- 
ters of importance to engineers. 

200 



CE 408 Steel Design and Construction 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CE 317. Analysis, design and construction of steel 
structures. Design of frames, members, connections and other re- 
lated topics. Tension members, compression members, beams, gird- 
ers, trusses and rigid frames. Fabrication and erection, including 
shop practice. 

CE 409 Concrete Design and Construction 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CE 317. Analysis and design of reinforced concrete 
beams, columns, slabs, footings, retaining walls. Basic principles of 
prestressed and precast concrete. Fundamentals of engineering 
drawings of concrete elements. 

CE 410 Land Surveying 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Permission. A study of boundary control and legal 
aspects of land s\u*veying, including deed research, evidence of 
boundary location, deed description and riparian rights. Theory of 
measurement and errors, position precision. 

CE 501 Senior Project 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Open to senior with chairman's approval. Supervised 
individual or group project. The project may be the preparation of a 
set of contract documents for the construction of a civil engineering 
facility, research work with a report or a project approved by the 
faculty advisor and department chairman. 

CE 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hom-s. 
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of depart- 
ment. Opportunity for the student under the direction of faculty 
member to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be 
initiated by the student. He must have the consent of the faculty 
director and the faculty director's chairman. 



201 



Department of Electrical Engineering 

Chairman: Professor Gerald J. Kirwin, Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

Associate Professors: Daniel O'Keefe, Ph.D., Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute; Stephen Grodzinsky, Ph.D., University 
of Illinois; Kantilal K. Surti, Ph.D., University of Connecticut. 

Assistant Professor: Darrell W. Horning, Ph.D., University of 
Illinois. 

Electrical engineering is fundamentally concerned with energy 
and information. The principles of electrical phenomena are applied 
to the generation, distribution and control of energy. Information 
systems including computers, radio and television communications 
systems, as well as apparatus for data processing, are a result of the 
application of electrical phenomena to specific tasks. Examples 
abound of both of these activities and include the nuclear power 
plant, the high voltage transmission line, the automated manufac- 
turing plant, the digital computer and the satellite communications 
system. 

The principal function of the graduate electrical engineer is to 
design apparatus and systems. He often develops new concepts and 
procedures by applying well established design principles to new 
situations or by the discovery of basic phenomena having im- 
mediate technological application. There are many instances in 
which a whole new technology has resulted from a successful re- 
search effort. The electronic hand calculator, for example, is the 
result of design and fabrication techniques that have been de- 
veloped only within the recent past. The integrated circuitry in the 
hand calculator is equivalent to tens of thousands of discrete trans- 
istors. 

An undergraduate program in electrical engineering must pre- 
pare the student for a professional career that will extend over a 
time span in excess of 40 years after graduation. Consequently, in a 
field where new developments occur at a continuous and rapid rate, 
it is imperative that the new graduate be thoroughly trained in 
basic principles which do not change and which form the foundation 
of electrical engineering. The program of studies at the University 
of New Haven includes a balanced concentration on basic engineer- 
ing analysis and design principles. Modern applications of these 
techniques are presented in laboratory and design courses. Since 
the origins of engineering methods are based in the sciences of 
chemistry, mathematics and physics, courses in these areas are an 
important part of the program. 

202 



The digital computer is of great importance in engineering for 
analysis and design. Electrical engineering students become com- 
petent in the use of computers for numerical applications and op- 
timizing engineering design. The computer is also studied as an 
element in a system where it is used to monitor and control complex 
industrial processes. 

Electrical engineering students have direct access to the de- 
partment computer laboratory which presently includes a Digital 
Equipment Corporation DEC lab 11/1 ID computer system. 

Electrical engineering students should possess good analytical 
abilities including sound mathematical competence. They should 
also have a natural curiosity about the multitude of technical de- 
vices encountered in everyday life, a willingness to learn the princi- 
ples that make these devices possible, and a desire to create new 
devices and methods of solving problems. 

The Electical Engineering Department has an active student 
section of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 
(IEEE). This organization sponsors visiting lecturers and field trips 
to surrounding industrial sites. Eta Kappa Nu, the national honor- 
ary society for electrical engineers, has the Zeta Rho Chapter of the 
university to honor superior students and to encourage high 
scholastic achievements. 



Requirements for the degree 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

A total of 126 to 130 credits are required for the Bachelor of 
Science degree in Electrical Engineering. The freshman year cur- 
riculum is common to all engineering disciplines and has been 
stated previously. 

Required courses include the following: in mathematics; M 118 
and M 203, Calculus II and III; M 204, Differential Equations, and 
one math elective in an advanced course. World Literature II, E 202, 
is required, as well as PH 205, Electromagnetism and Optics with 
laboratory, CE 205; Statics and Strength of Materials; Dynamics, 
ME 204; Principles of Economics I, EC 133; and IE 204, Engineering 

Economics. 

The following electrical engineering courses are required: EE 
201, Basic Circuits/Numerical Methods, EE 202; Network Analysis 
I; EE 253 and EE 349; Electrical Engineering Laboratory I, and II, 
EE 301; Network Analysis II, EE 347 and EE 348; Electronics I and 
II, EE 355, Digital Systems I; EE 361; Electromagnetic Theory; EE 

203 



302; Systems Analysis, EE 363; Energy Conversion, EE 420; Statis- 
tical Systems Analysis, EE 453; Electrical Engineering Laboratory 
III; and EE 462, Electromagnetic Waves. 

Electives required for graduation are: one elective in physics, 
one elective from the humanities or social sciences, one free elective, 
and four technical electives. Technical electives must be selected 
with the consultation of the advisor and approval of the department 
chairmgm. Generally, technical electives must be junior and senior 
level courses in the areas of engineering, mathematics or physics. 



Requirements for the minor 
Electrical Engineering 

The student electing a minor in electrical engineering must 
take the following courses: EE 201, Basic Circuits/Numerical 
Methods; EE 202, Network Analysis I; EE 347, Electronics I; EE 
355, Digital Systems I; EE 253, Electrical Engineering Laboratory 
I; and one electrical engineering elective. 



Prerequisites 

Students must complete the prerequisites for a course before 
registering in that course. Waivers from prerequisite requirements 
must be obtained in writing from the department chairman. 



Courses in Electrical Engineering 

EE 201-202 Basic Circuits/Numerical Methods 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IE 102, M 117, PH 150. Ideal circuit models, resis- 
tance, capacitance, inductance, active devices, voltage sources, and 
current sources. KirchofPs Laws, loop and node variables, resistive 
networks. Differential systems, forced and natural responses, 
analytic and numerical solutions. Sinusoidal steady state £ind three 
phase systems. 

EE 253 Electrical Engineering Lab I 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Laboratory exercises and projects include resistance, capacitance 
and inductance measurement, diode, transistor and operational 

204 



amplifier characteristics. Measurement of electrical parameters. 
Characteristics and applications of basic electrical laboratory ap- 
paratus. Note: Part time students are charged for a standard three 
semester hour course. 

EE 301 Network Analysis II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EE 202, M 203. Properties of transfer functions; 
frequency response curves, bandwidth and quality factor. Mutual 
inductance and two port parameters. Power, energy and harmonic 
phenomena in polyphase systems. Fourier series and Fourier trans- 
form, ideal filter properties. 

EE 302 Systems Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EE 301, M 204. Linear System Theory, Laplace 
transforms. State variables, transition matrix. Analjrtical and 
numerical solution techniques. Feedback systems, stability, obser- 
vability, controllability. 

EE 336 Electrical Engineering Systems 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EE 201. Single phase and three phase power systems 
properties. Characteristics of rotating machines and transformers. 
Diodes, transistors and other solid state devices amplif3dng and 
wave shaping circuits. Electrical instrumentation techniques. This 
course is intended for non-majors. 

EE 341 Digital Computer Techniques 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 203, EE 202. Numerical analysis techniques with 
applications to engineering problems. Design and execution of digi- 
tal computer algorithms. Digital simulations of djmamic systems. 

EE 344 Electrical Machines 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EE 202. Fields, forces, torques in magnetic systems. 
Theory, characteristics and applications of direct current and alter- 
nating current machines, including transformers and s5aichronous 
and induction machinery. 

EE 347-348 Electronics I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EE 202. Principles and applications of electronic de- 
vices including diodes, rectifiers, transistors, FETs and integrated 
circuits. Device models, parasitic effects. Single and multistage 

205 



power and voltage amplifiers, frequency responses. Feedback and 
stability effects. Design considerations. 

EE 349 Electrical Engineering Lab II 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EE 347. Laboratory exercises and projects. Measure- 
ment of diode, transistor and operational amplifier parameters. 
Amplifying, integrating and oscillating circuits. Design of logic 
elements. Transformers and electromechanical systems. Part time 
students are charged for a standard three semester hour course. 

EE 352 Physical Electronics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: PH 205, M 204. Basic principles of operation of 
semiconductor devices including diodes, transistors, LED's, photo- 
diodes, FET's, UJT's, tunnel diodes and lasers. Physical processes in 
semiconductors — drift, diffusion, carrier generation, conduction, 
light emission and absorption. 

EE 355-356 Digital Systems I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Fundamental concepts of digital systems. Boolean algebra and its 
application to logic design. Map and tabular techniques of minimi- 
zation. Synchronous and asynchronous sequential systems analysis 
and design. Applications to logic design problems of digital comput- 
ers. 

EE 361 Electromagnetic Theory 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 203, PH 205. Basic electromagnetic theory includ- 
ing static fields of electric charges and the magnetic fields of steady 
electric currents. Fundamental field laws. Maxwell's equations, 
scalar and vector potentials, Laplace's equation and boundary con- 
ditions. Magnetization, polarization, time varying electric and 
magnetic fields, field plotting. 

EE 363 Electromechanical Energy Conversion 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EE 361 and M 204. Introduction to electromechanical 
devices, lumped parameter electromechanics; introduction to rotat- 
ing machinery, equilibrium and stability, fields in moving matter; 
energy conversion dynamics. 

EE 420 Statistical Systems Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EE 301. The elements of probability theory. Continu- 
ous random variables. Characteristic functions and central limit 

206 



theorem. Stationgiry random processes and auto correlation. Power 
density spectrum of a random process. 

EE 437 Industrial Power Systems Engineering 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EE 202. Study of the components forming a power 
system, its economic operation; symetrical components and se- 
quence impedances in the study of faults and load-flow studies. 

EE 438 Electric Power Transmission 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EE 437. The fundamentals of electric generation, 
transmission and distribution. Transmission line analysis and per- 
formance, circle diagrams. Load-flow studies. Power system stabil- 
ity. 

EE 445 Communications Systems 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 420. The analysis and design of com- 
munication systems. Signal analysis, transmission of signals, 
power density spectra, amplitude, frequency and pulse modulation. 
Performance of communications systems and signal to noise ratio. 

EE 446-447 Pulse and Digital Circuits I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EE 301, EE 347. A study of circuits used for digital 
computers and pulse applications. Linear and non-linear wave- 
shaping, digital logic circuits, switching circuits, multi-vibrators, 
voltage comparators, negative resistance switching circuits, volt- 
age and current sweep circuits. Emphasis in the second course on 
integrated circuit technology and special topics of current interest. 

EE 450-451 Analysis and Design of Active Networks I and II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EE 301, EE 347. Techniques in the analysis and 
design of active and passive networks. S3nithesis of passive net- 
works, the operational amplifier, second-order active networks. 
Analog, Butterworth, and Chebyshev filters. Digital signal process- 
ing and additional selected topics. 

EE 453 Electrical Engineering Lab III 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing in Electrical Engineering. Laborato- 
ry exercises and projects. This course typically includes work with 
digital circuitry, analog circuitry, feedback controls, microwave 
devices. Note: Part time students are charged for a standard three 
semester hour course. 

207 



EE 455 Control Systems 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EE 302. Analysis of systems employing feedback. 
Performance criteria including stability. Design of compensation 
networks. Techniques of root locus, Routh-Hurwitz, Bode and 
Nyquist. Introduction to modem control theory including the con- 
cept of state. 

EE 462 Electromagnetic Waves 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EE 361. Electromagnetic wave propagation and re- 
flection in various structures, including coaxial, two wire, and 
waveguide systems. Various modes of propagation in rectangular, 
circular and coaxial waveguides. The dipole antenna. Smith chart 
techniques. 

EE 471 Computer Engineering I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EE 355. A study of the structure and organization of 
the digital computer. Addressable memory, instruction sets, 
machine language operating systems, compilers. Input/output 
devices, coding, A/D and D/A conversion techniques, multiplexing. 

EE 472 Computer Engineering II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EE471. Applications of computers to physical systems 
for monitor control functions. General interface design. Case 
studies may include: synchronous motor transient studies, shock 
wave phenomena, dynamic chemical reaction monitoring and con- 
trol, signal processing, FFT and digital filtering techniques, 
sampled data control system compensation techniques. Students 
must complete a project. 

EE 500 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Instructor's consent (May be repeated for credit). 
Open to seniors in Electrical Engineering. Special topics in the field 
of electrical engineering. Supervised independent study. Arranged 
to suit the interest and requirements of the student. 

EE 504 Laboratory Thesis. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. Open to seniors in electrical en- 
gineering. Students must submit approved proposal. Advanced 
laboratory problems. Students work on problems of their selection 
with the approval of the instructor. 

208 



Department of Industrial Engineering 

Chairman: Associate Professor William S. Gere, Jr., Ph.D., 
Carnegie-Mellon University. 

Professors: Edward T. George, D. Eng., Yale University; Alexis N. 
Sommers, Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Associate Professors: Joseph J. Arnold, M.S., Southern Connec- 
ticut State College, Francis J. Costello, M.S.M.E., New Jersey 
Institute of Technology; Ned B. Wilson, Ph.D., Ohio State 
University. 

Assistant Professors: Frank M. Clifford, M.B.A., University of 
New Haven; Ronald A. Haberman, M.S.O.R., Florida Institute 
of Technology; Richard A. Montague, M.S.I.E., Columbia Uni- 
versity. 



Industrial Engineering 

The study of industrial engineering prepares a student for a 
successful career in the manufacturing, research and service indus- 
tries. Based on a broad engineering background, the professional 
program taken in the last two years offers a perspective which 
enables the graduate to cope with complex problem situations en- 
countered in modern industry. Special attention is given to prepar- 
ing the student for the intelligent use of computers in modern 
industrial practice. Upon satisfactory completion of the prescribed 
four-year curriculum, graduates will receive the Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree in Industrial Engineering. 



Computer Technology 

The program in computer technology is designed to produce a 
graduate who h£is the ability to take control of a computer complex. 
Programming in several languages, and the organization and as- 
sociation of computer machinery are treated in depth. A strong base 
in mathematics, physics and general business techniques and prac- 
tices enables the graduate to work intelligently in either a business 
or engineering environment. Graduates are awarded the Bachelor 
of Science degree in Computer Technology. 

209 



Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree 
Industrial Engineering 

The industrial engineering major must complete 33 semester 
hours in specific Industrial Engineering courses. In addition to 
specific courses, the major student must complete 12 semester hours 
of course work, the specific nature of which will be determined in 
consultation with the student. The major student may slant his 
course of study in one of three directions: 1) industrial management, 
2) operations research, 3) computer science. 



Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree 
Computer Technology 

Majors in computer technology are required to complete 39 
semester hours of work in courses that are specifically related to 
computer technology. In addition to the above, the student is re- 
quired to complete an additional 18 semester hours in the industrial 
engineering discipline. 

Student Chapter AIIE 

Students in the industrial engineering major maintain a stu- 
dent chapter of the American Institute of Industrial Engineers. The 
student chapter operates under its own management but is af- 
filiated with the local senior chapter. Students often attend the local 
meetings of the professional chapter, developing their sense of pro- 
fessional identity. 

Requirements for the degree 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering 

A total of 128 to 132 credits are required for the Bachelor of 
Science degree in Industrial Engineering. The freshman year cur- 
riculum is common to all engineering disciplines and has been 
stated previously. 

Required courses include the following: in mathematics; M 118 
and M 203, Calculus II and III; M 204, Diff'erential Equations, or M 
231, Linear Algebra; and one mathematics elective which may be 
either IE 347, Probability Analysis, or any 300 or 400 series 
mathematics course. 

210 



Also required are PH 205, Electromagnetism and Optics with 
Laboratory; CE 201, Statics; E 202, World Literature II; Mechanics 
of Materials I; CE 202, D5Tiamics; ME 204, Engineering Graphics; 
ME 101, and gin elective in physics. 

Economics courses are required as follows: EC 133, Principles 
of Economics I; and EC 350, Economics of Labor Relations. In 
electrical engineering, students must take the following courses: 
EE 201, Circuits/Numerical Methods; and EE 336, Electrical En- 
gineering Systems. 

Industrial engineering courses are required as follows: IE 204, 
Engineering Economics; IE 224, Advanced FORTRAN Program- 
ming; IE 243, Work Analysis; IE 346, Statistical Analysis; IE 214, 
Management Theory; Production Control; EE 234, Operations Re- 
search; IE 502, Cost Control; IE 233, IE 443, Facilities Planning; 
and IE 504, Laboratory Thesis. 

Electives are required as follows: four technical electives, one 
free elective, and two electives from the humanities or the social 
sciences. Technical electives must be selected with consultation of 
the advisor and approval of the department chairman. Generally, 
technical electives must be junior or senior level courses in the areas 
of engineering, mathematics or physics. 

Requirements for the minor 
Industrial Engineering 

A total of 18 semester hours in the industrial engineering 
discipline is required for the minor. These courses must be taken: 
IE 102, Introduction to Computers; IE 204, Engineering Economics; 
IE 243, Work Analysis; IE 234, Production Control; IE 233, Cost 
Control; and IE 443, Facilities Planning. 

Engineering majors may substitute other industrial engineer- 
ing courses for a minor. Prerequisites for these courses must be met 
by all students pursuing the minor. 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree 
Computer Technology 

A total of 124 to 130 semester hours is required for the Bachelor 
of Science degree in Computer Technology. The freshman year 
curriculum in computer technology is not the same as most other 
engineering disciplines and is included in the following descrip- 
tion of required courses. 

211 



Required courses include the following: in mathematics; M 115, 
Math Analysis I (unless the student has sufficient preparation to be 
placed directly into Calculus I), and M 117 and M 118, Calculus I 
and II; English Composition, E 113; E 201 and E 202. World Litera- 
ture I and II, and E 220, Writing for Business and Industry, are 
required courses. HS 121, History of Science; ES 107, Introduction 
to Engineering; ME 101, Engineering Graphics; Pill, Psychology; 
and SO 113, Sociology, are also required courses. 

Physical Education I and II, PE 111 and PE 112, are required 
courses for which no credit is given. In lieu of PE 111 and PE 112 
students may elect to take course PE 100, Living with Leisure, for 
three semester hours credit. 

Two physics courses are required: PH 150, Mechanics, Heat, 
and Waves with Laboratory; and PH 205, Electromagnetism and 
optics with Laboratory. Digital Systems I and II, EE 355 and EE 
356, are courses required from the electrical engineering program. 
The following economics courses must be completed: EC 133, Prin- 
ciples of Economics I; and EC 350, Economics of Labor Relations. 

The following industrial engineering courses must be taken: IE 
105, Introduction to Computers: COBOL; IE 107, Advanced Data 
Processing; IE 225, Advanced COBOL Programming; IE 102, Intro- 
duction to Computers: FORTRAN; and IE 224, Advanced FOR- 
TRAN Programming. Also required are: Management Theory, IE 
214; Statistical Analysis, IE 346; Engineering Economics, IE 204; 
Cost Control and Production Control, IE 233 and IE 234; IE 332, 
PL/1, IE 321, Terminal and Remote Job Entry Systems; and IE 334, 
Assembler Language. 

Further industrial engineering requirements are: Hardware 
Operation, IE 336; Operations Research, IE 502; Operating Sys- 
tems, IE 320; APL/Basic RPG, IE 325; Simulations and Applica- 
tions, IE 335; IE 420, Computer Facilities Design; and IE 404, 
Computer Systems Design. 

Nine semester hours of electives are required, all from the 
humanities or the social sciences. 



Requirements for the minor 
Computer Technology 

Students may satisfy requirements for the minor in computer 
technology by completing 18 semester hours as follows: IE 102, 
Introduction to Computers; IE 224, Advanced FORTRAN Pro- 
gramming; IE 225, Advanced COBOL Programming; IE 334, As- 
sembler Language; IE 336, Hardware Operation; and Terminal and 

212 



Remote Job Entry Systems, IE 231. 

Other computer courses may be substituted by engineering 
majors who wish a minor in computer technology. Prerequisites for 
the courses must be met by all students pursuing the minor. 



Courses in Industrial Engineering 

IE 102 Introduction to Computers: FORTRAN 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 109 or equivalent. An introductory course in com- 
puters and FORTRAN for the Engineering and science students. 
The student is taught the basics of the FORTRAN language. The 
role of problem analysis, program analysis and programming 
techniques are presented. Several problems are programmed and 
debugged by the student and run on the campus computer facility. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 104 Computer Systems Design 

Credit, 3 semester hours 
Introduction to methods of evaluating corporate computer facility 
needs as a result of defined job type and job mix. Techniques are 
examined for effective determination of vendor offerings in terms 
of hardware and software capabilities to accommodate corporate 
needs. Laboratory Fee: $10.00 

IE 105 Introduction to Computers: COBOL 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 109 or equivalent. An introductory^ course in the 
application of the computer to the needs of today's society for busi- 
ness, social science and art students. Student use of data processing 
facilities of the campus computer center, problem solving, logic 
theory and the understanding of software packages are put into 
practice. Student learns how to develop flow charts and writes and 
debugs programs in COBOL. Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 106 Safety Organization and Management 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Pill. History and development of safety movement, 
nature and extent of problem, development of workmen's compen- 
sation, development of safety program, cost analysis techniques, 
locating and defining accident sources, analysis of the human ele- 
ment, employee training, medical service and facilities and the 
what and how of the Occupational Safety and Health Act. 

213 



IE 107 Introduction to Data Processing 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Introduction to the concepts, capabilities and limitations of elec- 
tronic data processing. Use of network systems, software packages 
and computer services. Project oriented — no programming re- 
quired. (For programming techniques and the above refer to IE 
105.) 

IE 119 Industrial Safety and Hygiene 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: IE 214 or MG 125. Not to be taken by students major- 
ing in occupational safety and health. A basic course in industrial 
accident prevention and industrial hygiene, covering: managerial 
accident prevention functions and responsibilities; injury data de- 
velopment, usage, and validity; machine guarding techniques and 
guard development, including point-of-operation drives; personal 
protective equipment; fire prevention and control, including 
flammable solvents, dusts, and their characteristics; electrical 
hazards, hand tools, power and manual; employee training; com- 
munications; hazard analysis; accident investigation. Industrial 
hygiene problems caused by solvents, dusts, noise, radiation are 
studied, as well as regulatory bodies, laws and catastrophe hazards. 

IE 201 Accident Conditions and Controls 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: IE 106. Mechanical hazards, machine and equipment 
guarding, boilers and pressure vessels, structural hazards, mate- 
rials handling hazards and equipment use, electrical hazards, per- 
sonal protective equipment. 

IE 204 Engineering Economics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 116 or M 117. A quantitative analysis of applied 
economics in engineering practice; the economy study for compar- 
ing alternatives; interest formulae; quantitative methods of com- 
paring alternatives; intangible considerations; selection and re- 
placement economy for machines and structures; break-even and 
minimum cost points; depreciation; relationship of accounting to 
the economy study; review of current industrial practices. Promotes 
logical decisions through the consideration of alternative courses of 
action. 

IE 214 Management Theory 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. Provides insight into the ele- 
ments of the managerial process and develops a rational synthesis 

214 



of the mass of detail comprising the subject matter of management. 
Focusing largely upon the complex problems of top and middle-level 
management, this course investigates what managers do under 
given circumstances, yet stresses the on-going activities of man- 
agement as part of an integrated, continuous process. 

IE 216 Elements of Industrial Hygiene 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IE 106, PH 103-104, CH 103. Analysis of toxic sub- 
stances and their effect on the human body, analysis and effect of 
chemical hazards, physical hazards of electromagnetic and ionizing 
radiation, abnormal temperature and pressure, noise, ultrasonic 
and low frequency vibration: sampling techniques including detec- 
tor tubes, particulate sampling, noise measurement, and radiation 
detection; governmental and industrial hygiene standard codes. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 217 Industrial Safety Auxiliary Functions 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IE 106, IE 201. All aspects of the legal constraints 
applicable to the occupational safety field are examined. Included 
are OSHA, federal laws not under OSHA jurisdiction, selected 
state legislation, current and pending product liability laws, en- 
vironmental protection laws and fire safety codes. Consideration 
will be made for emphasizing particular legal areas as requested. 

IE 223 Personnel Administration 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: IE 214 or MG 125. Provides a foundation in funda- 
mental concepts and a general knowledge of techniques in the 
administration of personnel relations. The nature of personnel ad- 
ministration, the handling of personnel problems, employee at- 
titudes and morale. Techniques of personnel administration: re- 
cruitment, interviews, placement, training, employee rating, as 
well as wage policies and administration. In order to secure breadth 
and depth in the approach to personnel problems, simple case 
studies are used at appropriate points throughout the course. 

IE 224 Advanced FORTRAN Programming 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IE 102 and M 115. Introduces the student to ad- 
vanced FORTRAN programming and encourages student use of the 
campus computer facility and its peripheral devices. Various typi- 
cal engineering and scientific computer applications are discussed 
and demonstrated. Problem solving innovations are presented. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

215 



IE 225 Advanced COBOL Programming 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: IE 105. Introduces the student to advanced techniques 
in programming and debugging programs written in COBOL for the 
campus computer. Various typical systems, analyses and applica- 
tions are discussed and demonstrated. Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 231 Terminal and Remote Job Entry Systems 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: IE 102 or IE 105. Introduction to the philosophy of 
terminal usage and remote job entry systems. Appropriate de- 
velopment of control, protection and integrity of programs and files 
accessible by a multitude of users. Review of data communications 
network. Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 233 Cost Control 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 115. Basic analysis of cost control techniques. De- 
signed to give members of the management team the underlying 
rudiments of cost control systems they will be using and by which 
they will be measured and controlled. Theory of standard costs, 
flexible budgeting, and overhead handling techniques emphasized 
by analytical problem solution. 

IE 234 Production Control 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EE 214 or MG 125; and M 115. The basic principles 
that govern production control in £in industrial plant. These princi- 
ples are worked out in the problems of procuring and controlling 
materials, in planning, routing, scheduling and dispatching. 
Familiarizes the student with present and new methods used in this 
field, including O.K. techniques. 

IE 243 Work Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 115. An introductory course in motion analysis, 
methods analysis, and work measurement. Motion and methods 
analysis techniques include the principles of motion economy, pro- j 
cess analysis charting, operations analysis, activity analysis, and I 
work design layout analysis. Students are required to design a work 
place project which will be filmed on CCTV for analysis. 

Work measurement includes an introduction to time study 
fundamentals and predetermined time systems. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

216 



IE 320 Operating Systems 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IE 102 or IE 105, IE 336. Introduction to operating 
systems, job control language and general structure of operating 
systems. Priority control structure and input/output routines with 
interrupt level and cycle-stealing philosophy also included. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 325 APL/Basic/RPG 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: IE 231. Exposure to the use of languages developed 
specifically for terminal use in an attempt to acquaint the student 
with instantaneous programming and problem solving via a cen- 
tralized computer facility. Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 332 PL/1 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IE 102, IE 105. Development of the use of PL/1, a 
combination business-oriented and scientific/engineering-oriented 
high level computer language. Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 334 Assembler Language 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IE 102, IE 105. Description of the functional charac- 
teristics of a computer main storage and peripheral unit structure 
along with the monitoring system control function via the use of the 
Assembler Language. Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 335 Simulations and Applications 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IE 224, IE 225. Evaluation of mathematical model- 
ing of a system (business or scientific/engineering-oriented) geared 
towards program simulation. Canned simulation programs (e.g.; 
Business Games, GASP, GPSS) will be evaluated and run. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 336 Hardware Operation 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IE 224, IE 225. Hands on computer operation of 
programs written by the student. Use of all I/O devices will be 
included along with description of disk monitoring system control. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 344 Advanced Work Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: IE 243. A course extending the principles introduced 
in the prerequisite course including the development of standard 

217 



data systems, formula construction in standard data, methods- 
time-measurement and master standard data predetermined time 
systems, work sampling, standards on indirect work, wage payment 
plans, and the use of closed circuit TV as a methods training tool. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00 

IE 346 Statistical Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 118. Provides an introduction to the application of 
statistical techniques to industrial and engineering problems, 
probability and distribution theory, measures of central tendency 
and dispersion in relation to population and samples, as well as 
applications of algebraic methods in industrial practice, including 
advanced statistical methods. 

IE 347 ProbabUity Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: QA 216 or IE 346. Develops the theory of probability 
and related applications. Introduces such relevant areas as: combi- 
nations and permutations, probability space, laws of large numbers, 
random variables, conditional probability, Bayes' Theory, Markov 
chains and stochastic processes. 

IE 420 Computer Facilities Design 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: IE 233, IE 243, IE 502. Introduction to the design and 
evaluation of corporate computer facilitates installations and phys- 
cial utilization. Analysis techniques including facilities layout, 
work flow, environmental design and human factors are utilized in 
the development of typical computer installations. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 436 Quality Control 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: IE 346. Economics of quality control; modern methods 
used by industry to achieve quality of product; preventing defects; 
organizing for quality; locating chronic sources of trouble; coor- 
dinating specifications, manufacturing, and inspection; measuring 
process capability, using inspection data to regulate manufacturing 
processes; control charts; selection of modern sampling plans. 

IE 443 Facilities Planning 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IE 243, IE 204. Factors in plant location, design, and 
layout of equipment. The basic principles of obtaining information 
essential for carrying out such investigations. Survey of such prac- 

218 



tices as material handling, storage and storeroom maintenance and 
use of service departments in modern factories. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

IE 502 Operations Research 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: QA 216 or IE 346. The operations research area is 
oriented to various mathematical and near- mathematical methods 
for getting answers to certain kinds of business problems. Simula- 
tion including Monte Carlo, queuing, the Flood method for assign- 
ing jobs, the transportation method, and linear programming in- 
cluding the simplex method with both algebraic solution and tab- 
leaus. 

IE 504 Laboratory — Thesis 

Credit, 3 or 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Senior LE. status. Advanced laboratory testing and 
special problems. The student works on problems of his own selec- 
tion which have been outlined by him and have received approval. 
They may be in the form of a semester thesis or a series of original 
experiments. 

IE 507 Systems Analysis (General) 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior status required. Presents the analytical and 
conceptual techniques upon which systems analysis and develop- 
ment is based, and applications to non-business as well as business 
operations. Development of case studies and their applications in- 
dependently oriented to the student's major area of interest. 

IE 508 Systems Analysis (Business and Engineering) 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IE 214 or MG 125, and M 115. Presents the analytical 
and conceptual techniques upon which systems analysis and de- 
velopment is based, and applications to business and industrial 
fields. Development of case studies and their applications indepen- 
dently oriented to the student's major area of interest. 

IE 510 Business Games 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: IE 214 or MG 125; and QA 216 or IE 346. The busi- 
ness games area gives the student the opportunity of correlating his 
entire course of study in a management simulation framework. 
These training games make use of simulation models that explore 
specific management areas in depth. Operations research 
techniques of scientific management are developed. The purposes of 

219 



these games are as follows: (1) to serve as a framework for training 
sessions in basic management principles; (2) to serve as an introduc- 
tion to the problem of manufacturing management; (3) to serve as a 
focal point for management development discussion of long-range 
planning and decision assisting tools; (4) to show the student the use 
of modern electronic computer methods. 

Departments of Mechanical Engineering, 
Materials Engineering and Aeronautical 
Technology 

Acting Chairman, Mechanical Engineering: Associate Professor, 
Richard J. Greet, Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Coordinator, Aeronautical Technology, Instructor Richard H. 
Strauss, B.A., Hawthorne College. 

Professors: Konstantine C. Lambrakis, Ph.D., Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute; Konstantine C. Lambrakis, Ph.D., Rensse- 
laer Polytechnic Institute; Ivan Lobay, M.E., Central University 
of Venezuela, Professional Engineer, Connecticut; Thomas C. 
Warner, Jr., M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
Professional Engineer, Connecticut. 

Associate Professor: Buddy B. Saleeby, Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Assistant Professor: Jerry W. Berglund, Ph.D., Polytechnic In- 
stitute of Brooklyn. 

Mechanical Engineering 

The Department of Mechanical Engineering has a long history 
of success in producing outstanding graduates in the fields of ther- 
mal sciences, fluids and design. To insure that graduates will con- 
tinue to distinguish themselves in either graduate school or the 
practice of engineering, increased emphasis is placed on the scien- 
tific foundation of the curriculum and on the breadth and scope of 
the professional courses. Implicit in this emphasis is a demand for a 
high level of maturity and flexibility on the part of the student. 

The rapid advances in science and technology require that 
mechanical engineers, as generalists among engineers, not only 
have a thorough understanding of basic scientific principles, but 
also have an appreciation for human values and an awareness of 
the effects of their contribution to the social, professional, economic 
and ecological climate in which they work. 

220 



Several options for concentration at the senior year are avail- 
able which a student may pursue. At that level, restricted elective 
courses may be selected, with the help of the student's faculty 
advisor, that offer the opportunity for further learning in areas such 
as fluids, energy, design, heat transfer, numerical analysis and 
computers, aerospace sciences and control systems. Plsins to extend 
the curriculum to incorporate studies in nuclear and chemical en- 
gineering are under consideration. 

Exceptional students having an overall average of 3.5 or better 
may join the Delta Zeta Chapter of Pi Tau Sigma Honorary Frater- 
nity which provides the opportunity for closer relations with the 
faculty and other prominent individuals in the field for the purpose 
of further professional development, involvement in faculty re- 
search and varied social and intellectual activities. 

Membership in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers 
student section is open to all mechanical engineering students of 
good standing and provides the opportunity for field trips to local 
industrial establishments, social activities and reading of interest- 
ing professional literature. 



Materials Engineering 

The performance of virtually every electrical, mechanical and 
structural device is limited ultimately by the materials from which 
it is made. The materials engineer is the expert on materials selec- 
tion. He must weigh the relative merits of metals against plastics, 
and specify materials for everything from ceramic magnets to 
aerospace composite fiber materials. The materials engineer is also 
the controller of materials processing during manufacture. This 
might include such diversity as powder metallurgy, plastic extru- 
sion, metal heat treatment and vapor deposition, to name but a few 
fabrication techniques. 

The Bachelor of Materials Engineering degree program pro- 
vides a broad core curriculum to develop an understanding of the 
fundamental principles common to all materials. It also incorpo- 
rates elective courses to enable the student to specialize in a particu- 
lar materials engineering field. Students in other disciplines may 
take a minor in materials engineering. 

A student chapter of the American Society for Metals permits 
students to keep abreast of the professional developments in mate- 
rials. 

221 



Aeronautical Technology 

An Associate in Science degree in Aeronautical Technology 
provides students interested in a career as a professional pilot or as 
a worker in the aerospace field with college level training in avia- 
tion and the related technologies. Since there is an increasing de- 
mand for specialists with higher degrees in this field, the program is 
being organized to incorporate the basic prerequisites to facilitate 
the transferring of its graduates into one of the bachelor of science 
programs in technology. Details of the program will be furnished 
upon request. 



Requirements for the Associate in Science degree 
Aeronautical Technology 

A total of 71 semester hours of credit is required for the As- 
sociate in Science degree in Aeronautical Technology. The program 
is designed to be completed within two years if the summer between 
the freshman and last years is utilized for two aeronautics courses. 

The courses required in addition to the aeronautics courses 
listed below depend upon the option that the student chooses and 
are established in consultation with the student's department 
chairman. 

The following aeronautics courses must be completed: AE 101, 
Primary Flight; AE 102, Orientation and Basic FAA Rules for 
Private Pilots; AE 111, Private Flight; AE 112, Aviation Meteorol- 
ogy; AE 121 and AE 131, Commercial Flying I and II; AE 122 and 
AE 132, FAA Commercial Requirements I and II; AE 133 and AE 
134, Aeronautics I and II; Aircraft Systems and Components, AE 
135; Instrument Flying, AE 141, Lectures on Navigation and In- 
strument Flying; AE 142, and Aircraft Powerplants, AE 143. 



Requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree 
Materials Engineering 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Materials Engineering re- 
quires 123 to 130 semester hours of credit for completion. The 
freshman year curriculum is the same for most engineering pro- 
grams and has been stated previously. 

Requirements for the second, third, and fourth year are as 
follows: in mathematics; M 1 18 and M 203, Calculus II and III, and 

222 



M 204, Differential Equations; in chemistry; CH 105, General 
Chemistry I, and an elective in chemistry; ME 101, Engineering 
Graphics, E 202, World Literature II, PH 205, Electromagnetism 
and Optics with Laboratory, EC 133, Principles of Economics I, and 
IE 204, Engineering Economics. 

Also required are: CE 201 and CE 202, Statics and Mechanics of 
Materials I; ME 204, Dynamics; ME 301, Thermodynamics; EE 201, 
Circuits/Numerical Methods; and EE 336, Electrical Engineering 
Systems. 

The following metallurgy courses must be taken: MT 219, 
Physical Metallurgy; MT 309 and MT 310, Materials Laboratory; 
MT 331, Non-Ferrous Metallurgy; MT 220, Electronic Materials; 
Mechanical Behavior of Materials, MT 304; Steels and Their Heat 
Treatment, MT 342; and Research Project, MT 500. 

Elective courses must be chosen as indicated: one physics elec- 
tive, two materials electives, two restricted electives, two electives 
from the humanities or the social sciences, and one free elective. 
Each student will meet with the materials engineering chairman 
during the spring term of his sophomore year to select the restricted 
electives which will result in a program of maximum benefit to the 
student. 



Requirements for the minor 
Materials Engineering 

A total of 18 semester hours of credit is required for a minor in 
materials engineering as follows: MT 219, Physical Metallurgy; MT 
309 and MT 310, Materials Laboratory; MT 331, Non-Ferrous 
Metallurgy; or MT 342, Steels and Their Heat Treatment; and three 
electives from metallurgy. 

Any transfer credit to be applied toward a minor in materials 
engineering must be approved by the materials engineering de- 
partment coordinator. 



Requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree 
Mechanical Engineering 

A total of 129 to 133 semester hours of credit is required for the 
Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. The 
freshman year curriculum is the same core program as most other 
engineering disciplines and has been stated previously. 

223 



Required courses are as follows: in mathematics; M 118 and M 
203, Calculus II and III; M 204, Differential Equations, and an 
elective in mathematics; in physics, PH 205, Electromagnetism and 
Optics with Laboratory, and a physics elective; E 202, World Litera- 
ture II; CE 201 and CE 202, Statics and Mechanics of Materials I; 
EE 201 and EE 336, Circuits/Numerical Methods and Electrical 
Engineering Systems; MT 200, Engineering Materials; EC 133, 
Principles of Economics I; and Engineering Economics, IE 204. 

Mechanical engineering courses are required as listed: ME 101, 
Engineering Graphics; ME 204, Dynamics; ME 301 and ME 302, 
Thermodynamics I and II; ME 307, Mechanics of Materials II; ME 
311, Machine Elements; ME 315, and ME 415, Mechanical En- 
gineering Laboratory I and II; ME 321, Fluid Mechanics; ME 344, 
Mechanics of Vibration; ME 312, Mechanical Design, or ME 322, 
Introduction to Gas Dynamics; Heat and Mass Transfer, ME 404; 
and Turbomachinery, ME 406. 

Six additional electives are required as follows: one free elec- 
tive, three technical electives, and two electives from the 
humanities or the social sciences. Technical electives must be 
selected with the consultation of the advisor and approval of the 
department chairman. Generally, technical electives will be chosen 
from the following courses: ME 312, Mechanical Design; ME 322, 
Introduction to Gas Dynamics; ME 343, Mechanisms; ME 401, 
Mechanical Systems Analysis; ME 403, Introduction to Flight 
Propulsion; ME 408, Advanced Dynamics; and ME 512, Senior 
Seminar. 



Requirements for the minor 
Mechanical Engineering 

A total of 18 semester hours of course work is required for the 
minor in mechanical engineering as follows: ME 204, Dynamics; 
ME 307, Mechanics of Materials II; ME 301 and ME 302, Ther- 
modynamics I and II; ME 312, Mechanical Design; and an elective 
in mechanical engineering. Any transfer credit to be applied toward 
a minor in mechanical engineering must be approved by the 
mechanical engineering department chairman. 



224 



Aeronautical Technology Courses 

AE 101 Primary Flight 

Credit, 1 semester hour. 
An introduction to the airplane. Flight and ground instruction to 
develop the student's proficiency for solo flight. Includes 10 hours of 
dual aircraft instruction, 3 hours of solo flight, 4 hours of discussion 
and 2 hours of Link Trainer. 

AE 102 Orientation and Basic FAA Rules for Private Pilots 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Basic ground instruction in aircraft systems and controls, FAA 
regulations, air traffic control, communications, weight-balance, 
meteorology, navigation, radio facilities and utilization, flight com- 
puter. This course is mandatory preparation for the FAA private 
pilot written exam. 

AE 111 Private Flight 

Credit, 1 semester hour. 
Flight and ground instruction to meet the requirements for the FAA 
private pilot certificate. Includes 12 hours of dual, 13 hours of solo, 8 
hours of discussion. 

AE 112 Aviation Meteorology 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Discussion of moisture, heat, circulation, stability, fronts, local 
weather, seasonal changes, general weather patterns, aviation 
forecasts; reports. 

AE 121 Commercial Flying I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Continuation of flight instruction received in AE 111 for the pur- 
pose of developing a higher degree of judgment and coordination 
through additional experience in more advanced maneuvers and in 
cross country flying. 

AE 122 FAA Commercial Requirements I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: AE 111, Corequisite: AE 121. Further ground instruc- 
tion in navigation, flight computer, radio navigation and aircraft 
engines in preparation for the FAA written examination. 

AE 131 Commercial Flying II 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: AE 121. Basic training in instrument and night fly- 
ing. Cross country flying and transition into high performance 
complex single engine aircraft. 

225 



AE 132 FAA Commercial Requirements II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: AE 122. Advanced topics pertaining to the prepara- 
tion for the FAA written examination. 

AE 133 Aeronautics I 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Theory of flight, types of aircraft, subsonic, transonic and super- 
sonic. Airplane structure, aviation physiology and high altitude 
phenomena. 

AE 134 Aeronautics II 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Theory of flight, types of aircraft, subsonic, transonic and super- 
sonic. Airplane structure, aviation physiology and high altitude 
phenomena. 

AE 135 Aircraft Systems & Components 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Theory of operation and analysis of problems associated with air- 
craft components and systems, involving light as well as jet aircraft. 

AE 141 Instrument Flying 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: AE 131. Preparation for the FAA instrument rating 
exam, involving 30 hours of instrument flight in addition to ground 
practices. 

AE 142 Lectures on Navigation and Instruments 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Corequisite: AE 141. Lectures on FAA regulations, navigation, 
meteorology, radio, navigational instruments and instrument 
flight procedures. 

AE 143 Aircraft Powerplants 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
The fundamentals of design and performance of aircraft engines 
including methods of construction, lubrication, carburation, engine 
operating procedures and control. 

Engineering Science Courses 

ES 103 Technology in Modern Society 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Scientific and technological developments and their implications 
for the future of society. Prospects and problems in communications, 

226 



energy sources, automation, transportation and other technologies. 
Use and control of technological resources for public benefit. 

ES 107 Introduction to Engineering 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Overview of the problems, perspectives and methods of the en- 
gineering profession. Modeling of real world problems for purposes 
of optimization, decision making and design. Practical techniques of 
problem formulation and analysis. 



Mechanical Engineering Courses 

ME 101 Engineering Graphics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An introduction to the principles and techniques of graphical com- 
munication. Fundamentals of orthographic projections; sections; 
applied geometry; auxiliary views; analysis of point, line, and plane 
relationships; detail and assembly drawing of simple machine 
parts. 

ME 102 Engineering Drawing and Design 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: ME 101. For technical students and draftsmen, cover- 
ing layout of assembly drawings; detailing of their parts, properly 
dimensioned, for interchangeable manufacture; use of ASA tables 
of metal fits for machine parts; use of threads and fasteners with the 
use of tolerances and limits. 

ME 124 Mechanical Processes 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Mill and manufacturing processes. The casting of metals, pattern 
making, £ind mold preparing. Fabricating, metal cutting, and weld- 
ing. Demonstrations, laboratory and inspection trips to local man- 
ufacturing plants. 

ME 204 Dynamics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CE 201, and M 1 18 or M 137 (M 1 18 or M 137 may be 
taken concurrently). Kinematics and dynamics of particles and 
rigid bodies with emphasis on two dimensional problems. Vector 
representation of motion in rectangular, polar and natural coordi- 
nates. Impulse-momentum and work-energy theorems. Rigid 
bodies in translation, rotation and general plane motion. 

227 



ME 301 Thermodynamics I 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 118 or M 137. Classical thermodynamics treat- 
ment of first and second laws. Thermal and caloric equations of 
state. Closed and open systems, and steady flow processes. Absolute 
temperature, entropy, combined first and second laws. Introduction 
to statistical thermodynamics: particle distributions, statistical 
concept of entropy, and relation to macroscopic properties. 

ME 302 Thermodynamics II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: ME 301, and M 203 (M 203 may be taken concur- 
rently). Extensions and applications of first and second laws: avail- 
ability, combustion processes, phase and chemical equilibrium, 
ideal gas mixtures. Maxwell's relations. Steam power and refriger- 
ation cycles. Internal combustion engine and gas turbine cycles. 
Irreversible thermodynamics. 

ME 307 Mechanics of Materials II 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CE 202. Elastic and plastic behavior of structural 
elements such as beams, columns, and shafts under direct and 
combined loading. Ultimate strength design, theory of failure, com- 
posite member design and an introduction to statically indetermi- 
nate structures. 

ME 311 Machine Elements 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CE 202. Analysis and design of machine elements to 
meet specified operating conditions. Stresses, deformations and 
other factors in design of machine parts. Application to machine 
elements such as joints, shafts, gears, couplings, brakes, clutches 
and flexible power-transmitting elements. 

ME 312 Mechanical Design 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: ME 307 or instructor's consent. Continuation of ME 
311. Design projects selected individually developed by the student. 

ME 315 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory No. 1 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CE 202, ME 204. Students conduct selected tests in 
the fields of mechanics of materials and vibrations. Emphasis 
placed on organization of the experiment, measurement techniques, 
sources of error, and organization of the report. Students are re- 
quired to design, conduct, and present one experiment of their own. 

228 



Note: Part time students are charged for a standard 3 semester hour 
course. 

ME 321 Fluid Mechanics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: ME 204 and M 203. Fluid kinematics: continuity 
equation, vector operations. Momentum equation for frictionless 
flow: Bernoulli equation with applications. Irrotational flow: veloc- 
ity potential, Laplace's equation, dynamic pressure and lift. Steam 
function for incompressible flows. Rotational flows: vorticity, circu- 
lation, lift, and drag. Integral momentum analysis. Navier Stokes 
equation: stress tensor, Newtonian fluid. Boundary layer approxi- 
mations, 

ME 322 Introduction to Gas Dynamics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: ME 302 and ME 321 (ME 321 may be taken concur- 
rently). Compressible fluid flow with emphasis on one-dimensional 
ducted steady flows with heat transfer, frictional effects, shock 
waves, and combined effects. Introductory considerations of two and 
three dimensional flows. Occasional demonstrations will accom- 
pany the lectures. 

ME 335 Tool Design 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: CE 201 and ME 124 (ME 124 may be taken concur- 
rently). Basic techniques of tool design, methods, analysis, drill jig 
design, tolerances and allowances, cutting tools, die design, gauges, 
and fixtures. 

ME 336 Tool Engineering 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: ME 335 or Instructor's Consent. A continuation of ME 
335 with emphasis on economics, estimating, and process planning. 
Students design projects requiring the complete planning and de- 
signing necessary to manufacture machine parts. 

ME 343 Mechanisms 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: ME 204. Graphical and analytical methods for deter- 
mining displacements, velocities, and accelerations of machine 
components. Application to simple mechanisms such as linkages, 
cams, gears. 

229 



ME 344 Mechanics of Vibration 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: ME 204. The mathematical relationships necessary 
for the solution of problems involving the vibration of lumped and 
continuous systems; damping; free and forced motion; resonance, 
isolation; energy methods; balancing; single, two and multiple de- 
grees of freedom; vibration measurement. 

ME 401 Mechanical Systems Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: ME 204, M 204. Dynamical systems and their 
characterisitics. Analogy of electrical, mechanical, and other sys- 
tems. Mixed systems — Dimensional Analysis — Design considera- 
tions. 

ME 403 Introduction to Flight Propulsion 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: ME 322 and Instructor's consent. A senior course 
designed for those students who intend to work or pursue further 
studies in the aerospace field. Among the topics covered are: Deto- 
nation and deflagration, introductory one-dimensional non-steady 
gas flows, basic concepts of turbo-machinery, and survey of the 
contemporary propulsive devices. Shock tubes, supersonic wind 
tunnels and flame propagation demonstrations will accompany the 
lectures. 

ME 404 Heat and Mass Transfer 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: ME 302, ME 321, and some knowledge of differential 
equations (ME 321 may be taken concurrently). Conduction in 
solids, solution of multi-dimensional conduction problems, un- 
steady conduction, radiation, boundary layer and convection. Intro- 
duction to mass transfer. The lectures will include occasional dem- 
onstrations of convection, radiation, heat exchangers. 

ME 405 Advanced Mechanical Design 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: ME 321. Selected and advanced topics related to the 
design of machine elements such as hydrodynamic theory of lubri- 
cation and principles of hydraulic machines with application to 
hydraulic couplings. 

ME 406 Turbomachinery 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: ME 302 and ME 321. Review of basic Ther- 
modynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Dimensional analysis. Specific 

230 



speed. Classification of turbomachines. Cavitation. Losses. Defini- 
tions of efficiency. Theories of turbomachines. Design considera- 
tions for stator blades and rotor blades. Computer aided design. 

ME 407 Solar Energy Thermal Processes 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: ME 321, ME 404 (concurrently). Introduction to the 
fundamentals of solar energy thermal processes including solar 
radiation, flat plate and focusing collectors, energy storage, hot 
water, heating, cooling and auxiliary system components. Em- 
phasis on the design and evaluation of systems as they pertain to 
commercial and residential buildings. 

ME 408 Advanced Dynamics 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: ME 204, M 204. Plane and spatial motion of particles 
and rigid bodies, inertia tensor, relative motion, gyroscopes, central 
force motion, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods. 

ME 410-411 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering I & II 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 204. The fundamental scientific and engineering 
principles of nuclear reactor systems. Reactor design and behavior 
related to fission process, its associated radiations and engineering 
principles. 

ME 415 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory No. 2 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: ME 302, ME 321, and ME 404. A survey of experi- 
ments and laboratory investigations covering the areas of fluid 
mechanics, thermodynamics, heat transfer and gas dynamics. 
Note: Part time students are charged for a standard 3-semester- 
hour course. 

ME 512 Senior Seminar 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Open to seniors with chairman's approval. An independent design, 
theoretical analysis, or laboratory investigation as chosen by the 
student and approved by the chairman of the department. The work 
is performed by the student with frequent critiques by the responsi- 
ble faculty member. 



231 



Materials Engineering Courses 

MT 200 Engineering Materials Spring Term 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A study of the properties of the principal engineering materials of 
modern technology: Steels and non ferrous alloys and their heat 
treatment, concrete, wood, ceramics, and plastics. Gives engineers 
sufficient background to aid them in selecting materials and setting 
specifications. 

MT 219 Physical Metallurgy Fall Term 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 105. Introduction to the relationships between 
atomic structure and macroscopic properties such as mechanical 
strength and ductility. Atomic bonding, crystallography, phase 
equilibrium and phase transformations are among the topics con- 
sidered. 

MT 220 Electronic Materials Spring Term 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PH 205. Study of transport and rearrangement of 
charge to determine electric and magnetic properties of solids. 
Semiconductors, superconductors and magnetic materials are 
among the topics considered. 

MT 301 Welding Metallurgy 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MT 219. Study of welding and brazing procedures of 
ferrous and nonferrous alloys, with consideration of macro and 
microstructures of welded members. 

MT 302 Polymeric Materials 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: CH 105. Chemistry and physical properties of rubber 
and plastic materials. Consideration of both fundamental principles 
and engineering applications. 

MT 304 Mechanical Behavior of Materials Spring Term 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MT 219. Detailed study of elastic and plastic deforma- 
tion of materials at room temperature and elevated temperatures. 
Dislocation theory and micro-plasticity models considered. 

232 



MT 309 Materials Laboratory: Metallography 

Credit, IV^ semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MT 219. Laboratory preparation of both ferrous and 
nonferrous samples for microscopic investigation, including photo- 
microscopy with metallograph microscope. 

MT 310 Materials Laboratory: Heat Treatment 

Credit, 1\^ semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MT 219. Laboratory documentation of the effects of 
heat treatment in annealing and hardening both ferrous and non- 
ferrous materials. 

MT 324 Nuclear Metallurgy 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MT 219. Consideration of nuclear reactors, the pro- 
duction and fabrication of metals gmd alloys used as reactor compo- 
nents, nondestructive testing and radiation damage of materials. 

MT 331 Non ferrous Metallurgy Fall Term 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MT 219. The physical metallurgy of aluminum, cop- 
per, magnesium, and other nonferrous metals. Alloying, fabrication 
and consideration of materials properties which make nonferrous 
metals competitive with steels. 

MT 342 Steels and Their Heat Treatment Fall Term 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MT 219. Fundamentals of ferrous physical metallurgy 
such as iron-carbon phase diagram, transformation diagrams, har- 
denability, and the effects of alloying elements. Heat treating dis- 
cussed in terms of resulting microstructures and physical proper- 
ties, 

MT 400 Materials Reactions 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MT 219. Consideration of chemical reactions in the 
liquid and solid state of importance to the field of materials en- 
gineering. Topics to include extractive metallurgy, internal oxida- 
tion, surface treatment and recycling of secondary materials. 

MT 401 Materials Analysis 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 204 (may be taken concurrently), MT 219. 
Mathematical treatment of selected topics of diffusion, phase trans- 
formations and mechanical and electrical properties of materials. 

233 



MT 500 Research Project 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: MT 331, MT 342, plus senior status. An independent 
design, theoretical analysis or laboratory investigation, chosen by 
the student and approved by the chairman of the department. The 
work is performed by the student with frequent critiques by a 
faculty member. 

MT 599 Independent Study 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a maximum 

of 12. 
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty supervisor and approval of de- 
partment chairman. Independent study provides an opportunity for 
the student to explore an area of special interest under faculty 
supervision. The project must be initiated by the student, have the 
consent of the faculty director and the approval of the department 
chairman. 



234 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



Norman I. Botwinik, 

Chairman 

President, Botwinik Brothers, Inc. 

Robert M. Gordon, 

Vice Chairman 

President, Raybestos-Manhattan, 
Inc. 

George R. Tiernan, Secretary 

Attorney at Law 

Hubert C. Hodge, Assistant 
Secretary 

President, American Buckle 

Company 

James Q. Bensen 

Resident Manager, Bethlehem Steel 
Corporation 

Roland M. Bixler 

President, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 
Mrs. Kingman Brewster, Jr. 
Mrs. J. F. Buckman 
Ann Capecelatro 
Peter H. Comstock 

Chairman of the Board and President, 
Pratt-Read Corporation 

Charles H. Costello 

Chairman of the Board, C. Cowles and 
Company 

Arlene Cullen 

Day Student, University of New 
Haven 

Elizabeth G. Curren 

New Haven Register 



Abbot H. Davis, Jr. 

Vice President, Marketing, The 
Southern New England Telephone 
Company 

Robert B. Dodds 

President, Safety Electrical Equip- 
ment Corporation 

Edward J. Drew 

Manager, Quinnipiack Club 
Joseph F. Duplinsky 

President, Connecticut Blue Cross, 
Inc. 

John E. Echlin, Jr. 

Account Executive, Bache and Com- 
pany, Inc. 

Frederick G. Fischer 

Partner, Ernst & Ernst 

John A. Frey 

President, Hershey Metal Products, 
Inc. 

EUiot Gant 

Investment Banker 

Stephen J. Grasso 

Evening Student, University of New 
Haven 
Herman Grier 

Evening Student, University of New 
Haven 
Stephen E. Grodzinsky 

Associate Professor, University of 
New Haven 

Nathan Hamilton 

Attorney at Law 



235 



Phillip Kaplan 

President of the University 

William F. Leonard 

Vice President, Civic and Govern- 
ment Relations, Olin Corporation 

Ellis C. Maxcy 

Formerly President, The Southern 
New England Telephone Company 

Timothy Mellon 

President, Eleven Thirty, Inc. 

George I. Mordecai 

The Southern New England Tele- 
phone Company 

Herbert H. Pearce 

President, H. Pearce Company 

Rosemarie A. Polidoro 

Day Student, University of New 
Haven 
Mary Quinlan 

Adjunct Professor, University of New 

Haven 
Mrs. William F. Robinson, Sr. 
Shir lee S chaffer 

Writer and Commentator, WELI 



Franklin B. Sherwood 

Associate Professor, University of 
New Haven 
Janice M. Sypek 

Day Student, University of New 

Haven 
Edward D. Taddei, GRI 

President, The Barrows and Wallace 

Co., Realtors 
Leon J. Talalay 
Robert M. Totton 

General Manager, New Haven Office, 

New York Life Insurance Company 
F. Perry Wilson, Jr. 

Vice President, Corporate Division, 

The First New Haven National Bank 
Charles B. Womer 

Director, Yale-New Haven Hospital 

FeUx Zweig 

Professor of Engineering and Applied 
Science, Yale University 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

Executive Mr. Botwinik, Chairman; Mr. Gordon, Vice Chairman; Messrs. Ben- 
sen, Davis, Dodds, Fischer, Hodge, Kaplan, Mrs. Robinson, Messrs. Talalay, 
Tieman. 

Finance Mr. Fischer, Chairman; Mr. Bensen, Vice Chairman; Messrs. Dodds, 
Duplinsky, Echlin. 

Fund Raising Mr. Bensen, Chairman; Mr. Fischer, Vice Chairman; Messrs. 
Bixler, Comstock, Dodds, Leonaird, Mordecai, Talalay. 

Nominating Mr. Pearce, Chairman; Mr. Gant, Vice Chairman; Messrs. C. Cos- 
tello, Frey, Mrs. Robinson. 

Personnel Mr. Talalay, Chairman; Mr. Taddei, Vice Chairman; Mrs. Brewster, 
Mr. Totton. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

Buildings and Grounds Mr. Botwinik, Chairman; Mr. Talalay^ Vice Chair- 
man; ^fessrs. Drew, Mordecai, Miss Sypek, Messrs. Taddei, Zweig. 

Development Mr. Bixler, Chairman; Mr. Maxcy, Vice Chairman; Mrs. Brews- 
ter, Messrs. Davis, Leonard, Mellon, Miss Quinlan, Mrs. Schaffer, Messrs. Tad- 
dei, Talalay, Zweig. 

Public and Industrial Relations Mr. Davis, Chairman; Messrs. Com- 
stock, Drew, Gant, Grasso, Hamilton, Pearce, Mrs. Schaffer, Mr. Womer. 



236 



ADMINISTRATION 

Office of the President 

Phillip Kaplan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., President 

Dalen A. Bowles, Assistant to the Chairman of the Board and 

to the President 
Mary Mento, Executive Secretary 

Office of the Provost 

Alexis N. Sommers, B.M.E., M.S., Ph.D., Provost 
Ned B. Wilson, B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D., Assistant Provost 
Buddy B. Saleeby, B.S.M.E., M.A.M.E., Ph.D., Associate Dean 

for University of New Haven at New London 
George A. Schaefer, B.S., M.B.A., Associate Dean for 

Administration 
Marion I. DePalma, Executive Secretary 

Office of the President Emeritus 

Marvin K. Peterson, B.S. in Econ., M.Ed., L.H.D., President 
Emeritus and Special Assistant to the President 

Dalen A. Bowles, Assistant to the Chairman of the Board and 
to the President 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF 
THE UNIVERSITY 

Academic Council, Dr. Sommers, Chairman 
Academic Standing and Admissions, Dr. Sommers, Chairman 
Board of Athletic Control, Dr. Jewell, Chairman 
Board of Faculty Welfare, Dr. Dinegar, Chairman 
.Board of Security Control, Chairman, To be elected 
Commencement and Convocations, Dr. Jewell, Chairman 
Committee on Internal A^airs, Dr. Kaplan, Chairman 
Deans' Council, Dr. Sommers, Chairman 
Development, Dr. Kaplan, Chairman 
Faculty Senate, Chairman, To be elected 
Library, Mr. Beiker, Chairman 

237 



Personnel Policy, Mr. Shattuck, Chairman 

Sabbatical Leave Committee, Chairman, To be announced 

Student Aid and Services, Mr. Ghoreyeb, Chairman 

Student Affairs, Mr. Ghoreyeb, Chairman 

Teacher Education Advisory, Dr. Olgin, Chairman 

Tenure and Promotion, Dr. Dinegar, Chairman 



ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION 

Academic Divisions 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Douglas Robillard, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Dean 
Ralf E. Carriuolo, B.S., M.M., Ph.D., Chairman of Humanities 
Kee W. Chun, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Chairman of Physics 
Dennis Courtney, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chairman of Psychology 
Peter J. Desio, B.S., Ph.D., Chairman of Chemistry 
Caroline Dinegar, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chairman of Political 

Science 
Bruce A. French, B. A., M. A., Coordinator of Foreign Languages 
Johnnie M. Fryer, B.A., M.S., Chairman of General Studies 
Walter O. Jewell, III, A.B., Ph.D., Chairman of Sociology 
Thomas Katsaros, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Chairman of History 
Paul Marx, B.A., M.F.A., Ph.D., Chairman of English 
Elizabeth J. Moffitt, B.F.A., M.A., Chairman of Fine Arts 
Philip Olgin, B.S., Ed.M., Ed.D., Director of Teacher Education 
Richard M. Stanley, B.E.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chairman of 

Mathematics 
H. Fessenden Wright, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Chairman of Science 

and Biology 
Michael J. Wynne, B.A., M.A., Coordinator of Social Welfare 
Donald Wynschenk, B.S., M.S., Chairman of Physical 

Education 
Edna Paul, Executive Secretary 
Marjorie Bertolini, Faculty Secretary 
Lucille Faccadio, Faculty Secretary 
Genevieve Lysak, Faculty Secretary 
Irene North, Faculty Secretary 

* Louise Allen, Faculty Secretary 

* Cornelia Mas, Faculty Secretary 
*Julie Wood, Faculty Secretary 

238 



School of Business Administration 

Warren Smith, B.A., M.B.A., Dean 

John KakaUk, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Dean, Chairman of Mar- 
keting and International Business 

John Coleman, B.S.E., M.S. I.E., Chairman of Public Administra- 
tion and Hotel Administration 

Wilfred Harricharan, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chairman of Management 
Science and Operations Management 

John Teluk, B.S., M.S., Chairman of Economics 

Gilbert Whiteman, A. A., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Chairman of Communi- 
cation 

Jeffrey L. Williams, B.S., M.B.A., Chairman of Accounting 

Collette Foley, Executive Secretary 

Lois Anderson, Faculty Secretary 

Jean Bensen, Faculty Secretary 

Dorothy Berman, Faculty Secretary 

Clarador Feldman, Faculty Secretary 

Eleanor Roppo, Faculty Secretary 

School of Engineering 

Konstantine C. Lambrakis, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean 

William S. Gere, Jr., B.S.M.E., M.S.I.E., M.S., Ph.D., Chairman of 
Industrial Engineering 

Richard J. Greet, B.E.E., M.S., Ph.D., Acting Chairman of 
Mechanical Engineering 

Gerald J. Kirwin, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chairman of Electrical En- 
gineering 

Ross M. Lanius, Jr., B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., Chairman of Civil En- 
gineering 

Richard H. Strauss, B.A., Coordinator, Aeronautical Technology 

Viola Dunnigan, Executive Secretary 

Irene Asprelli, Faculty Secretary 

Maria DeLise, Faculty Secretary 

Nancy Glass, Faculty Secretary 
* Lucille Lamberti, Faculty Secretary 

Graduate School 

Gwendolyn E. Jensen, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean 
Henry E. Voegeli, B.A., Ph.D., Associate Dean 
John Kakalik, B.A., Ph.D., Director of the Executive Master of 

Business Administration 
Dennis L. Kalma, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Coordinator of Environmental 

Studies 

239 



Frank McGee, Jr., A.B., M.P.A., Coordinator of Public Adminis- 
tration 

Geraldine K. Dorman, Executive Secretary 
* Karen Muller, Secretary 
*Doreen S. Griffith, Receptionist 



Continuing Education 

Richard M. Lipp, B.S., M.B.A., Director 
J. Matthew Connery, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Director 
Muriel MacKay, A.S., Continuing Education Registrar 
Mary Ann Mikosky, A.S., B.S., Executive Secretary 

*Delma Hueffman, Admissions Secretary 

*Florence Poppendick, Registration Secretary 

* Karen Taragowski, Secretary- Receptionist 

*Barbara Weber, Secretary-Receptionist 



Management Center 

Warren J. Smith, B.S., M.B.A., Acting Director 
Collette Foley, Executive Secretary 

Special Studies 

Virginia M. Parker, A.B., Director 
L. Claire Cappiello, Secretary 

Office of Academic Development 

Joseph Chepaitis, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director 
Marion I. DePalma, Executive Secretary 



STUDENT AFFAIRS ADMINISTRATION 

Office of the Dean 

John W. Ghoreyeb, B.A., M.A., Dean 
Dorothy I. Levitsky, Executive Secretary 

Admissions 

John E. Benevento, B.S., M.A., Director 

Earl O. Hamel, Jr., A.B., Director of Scheduling 



240 



Robert A. Campbell, B.A., M.A., Assistant Director of Admissions 

Jeanne M. D'Ambruoso, B.A., Admissions Counselor and Assis- 
tant Director of Scheduling 

Thomas Bell, B.S., M.A., Admissions Counselor 

Robert Petrashune, B.A., Admissions Coordinator for the Univer- 
sity of New Haven at New London 

Eva Widger, Executive Secretary 

Adele Olivi, Admissions Records 

Beatrice Cordone, Secretary 

Yolando Costanzo, Secretary 
* Jane Campbell, Secretary- Receptionist for the University of New 

Haven at New London 
*Nancy DeMartino, Secretary- Receptionist 

Career Development 

Christian F. Poulson, B.A., M.B.A., Director 
Marlene Wajnowski, Secretary 

Chaplains 

The Reverend Ernest Bodenweber, Jr., First Congregational 

Church, West Haven 
The Reverend Paul F. McLaughlin, St. Paul's Roman Catholic 

Church, West Haven 
Rabbi Leon Mirsky, Congregation Sinai, Inc., West Haven 

Counseling 

Michael W. York, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director 
Lynn H. Monahan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Counselor 
Vivian Nash B.A., Ph.D., Counselor 
Jerome P. Weber, B.A., Counselor 
Ann Massini, Secretary 

Financial Aid 

David DuBuisson, B.A., Director 

Robert Branch, Jr., B.B.A., Assistant Director 

Evelyn Sherwood, Secretary 

Foreign Students 

David DuBuisson, B.A., Advisor 
Bruce A. French, B.A., M.A., Counselor 



241 



Housing and Health 

Philip S. Robertson, B.A., M.S., Director 
Shelia Wade, B.A., Rathskellar Manager 
Jon M. Fessel, M.D., University Physician 
Ida Cuzzocreo, R.N., Head University Nurse 
*Agnes Quinn, R.N., University Nurse 

Minority Student Affairs 

Peter A. Rogers, B.S., Director 

Radio Station WNHU 

Richard L. Gelgauda, B.S., General Manager 

Student Records 

Joseph Macionus, B.S., M.P.A., Registrar 

Frank A. S. Elliot, B.S., Coordinator of Registration Systems 

Mary Burdick, Recorder 

Mary Klump, Assistant Registrar 

Marjorie Manfreda, Recorder 

Helen Carey, Transfer Credit Analyst 

Ann Chernick, Secretary 

Ellen Leuzzi, Secretary 

Veterans' Affairs 

George A. Schaefer, B.S., M.B.A., Coordinator 
Eleanor Jorczyk, Secretary 

Women's Affairs 

Carole Aiken, B.A., M.A., Director 

General University Administration 

Business and Finance 

Treasurer's Office 

Frank G. Hull, B.S., Treasurer of the University 
* Elsie Calandro, Secretary 

Business Office 

Olga C. Griffeth, A.B., Director and Secretary of the University 
Mary Lou D'Addio, Accounts Receivable 
Marjorie Deobil, Payroll 

242 



Lucille DeStefano, Accounts Payable 
Julie Hylwa, Accounts Receivable 
Rose King, Accounts Payable 
Francis MacMillan, Accounts Receivable 
*Lois Ucas, Accounts Receivable 

Data Center 

Edward T. George, B.S., M.S., D.Engr., Director 
David DiVincenzo, B.S., Programmer Operator 
Susan Hung, B.A., Analyst Programmer 
Cynthia Kranyik, B.A., M.S., Academic Operations 
Raymond Pulaski, B.S., Manager Hardware Operations 
Salvatore Votto, Jr., B.S., Administrative Systems 
Mark Weber, B.S., Programmer Operator 
Audrey Kushner, Unit Record Operator 
Roberta C. Peccerillo, Secretary 

* Robert Schuster, Computer Operator 

Procurement, Buildings and Grounds 

Ralph D. Byard, M.B.A., Director 

Theodore F. Kunkel, B.S., Assistant to the Director 

Helen Rothfuss, Executive Secretary 

Anastasia Avgerinos, Administrative Aide 

Harry Flore ntino. Supervisor of Maintenance 

Reno Mercado, Supervisor of Custodians 

General University 

Audio Visual 

Walter F. Hurd, Coordinator 

Development and Alumni Relations 

Lawrence C. Parker, A.B., M.A., Director 
Janet Seymour, Executive Secretary 
Sara Haddad, Alumni Secretary 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Joseph A. Machnik, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Director 

* Jack Larocca, Director of Sports Information 
Margaret Bertolini, Secretary 

Barbara McGill, Secretary 



243 



Grants Office 

Ahmed R. Mandour, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Grants Officer 
* Elsie Calandro, Secretary 

Language Laboratory 

Bruce French, B.A., M.A., Coordinator 
Paul Marx, B.A., M.F.A., Ph.D. 

Library 

Samuel M. Baker, Jr., B.A.A, B.S., M.A., University Libr£irian 
Rita B. Conroy, Adminis. Asst. to University Librarian 

Dorothy S. Lockrow, B.A., M.A., Assistant University Librarian 
Edith C. Lissey, Library Technician: Ordering 
D. Jeanne Martin, Library Technician: Ordering 
Elizabeth Kuchinski, Library Technician: Cataloging 
Annette Greenhouse, Library Technician: Cataloging 
Patricia Taylor, Library Technician: Cataloging 
Lorraine C. Burke, Library Technician: Circulation 
Carol D. Depgen, Library Technician: Circulation 
Lillian B. Goldsmith, Library Technician: Circulation 
Jane F. Joseph, Library Technician: Circulation 

Eric W. Johnson, B.S., M.S., Reference/Documents Librarian 
Larola F. B. Gamble, Library Technician: Documents 
AUena T. MacDougall, Library Technician: Documents 

Dorothy M. Rawlins, B.A., M.L.S., Reference/Serials Librarian 

Barbara B. Caine, Library Technician: Serials 
*Annabelle J. D'Amicis, Library Technician 

* Jessie E. Delahanty, Library Technician 
*Maryann H. Dinneen, Library Technician 
*Ulma S. Faulkner, Library Technician 
*Ann R. Gaunya, Library Technician 
*Anna L. Hohl, Library Technician 

* Joyce C. McVey, Library Technician 

* Sybil J. Merritt, Library Technician 

Office of Equal Opportunity 
Title IX Coordinator 

Carole Aiken, B.A., M.A., Director 

Personnel Office 

James H. Shattuck, B.S., B.A., Director 
Georgianne DeMaio, Secretary 

244 



Public Relations 

Thornton B. Smallwood, A.B., Director 
Joseph J. Cieplak, B.S., Associate Director 
Elizabeth T. Bennett, Staff Assistant 
Richard K. Noyes, B.A., M.A., Staff Assistant 
*Dolores D'Agostino, B.A., Secretary 

Security 

Donald R. Scott, Director 

Richard Baker, Assistant to the Director 

John Amato, Patrolman 

Nestor Delmonte, Guard 

Eldridge Hatcher, Patrol Supervisor 

Ted Kastancuk, Guard and Dispatcher 

Kevin Lash, Security Guard 

Arcadio Rodriguez, Patrol Supervisor 

Arthur Sheehan, Patrolman 

Oscar Stanley, Patrolman 

Ronald Whittaby, Security Officer 

* Andrew Chin, Dormitory Guard 

* Patrick Garatoni, Security Guard 
*Rosemarie Giannotti, Secretary 

Services 

Joyce Bennett, Switchboard Operator 

Frances Erba, Secretary, Day Student Government 

David Gralnick, Mail 

Stephanie Magliola, Switchboard Operator 

Leo Pacquette, Locker Rooms 

Irene Perry, Receptionist 

* Dolores Board, Switchboard Operator 
*Celia DiNello, Clerical and Duplication 
*James Sullivan, Mail 

*Earl Walker, Mail 

*Mary Yurczk, Clerical and Duplication 



* Part-Time 

245 



ADVISORY COUNCILS 

ALUMNI ADVISORY COUNCIL 



John A. Frey, '44, President 
President 

Hershey Metal Products, Inc. 
Ansonia, Connecticut 

Elizabeth G. Curren, '68, Vice 
President 

Society Editor 

New Haven Register 

New Haven, Connecticut 

Patricia L. Zarnowski, '71, 
Secretary 

John Hurley Company 

Norwich, Connecticut 

Stanley Gniazdowski, '72, 
Treasurer 

Associate 

James Moniello Associates, Inc. 

East Haven, Connecticut 

John F. Beckert, '72 

Assistant to President 

First Federal Savings & Loan 

Association of Madison 
Madison, Connecticut 

William C. Bruce, '74 

Yale University Law School 

New Haven, Connecticut 
George J. Conkling, '35 

Retired 

Hamden, Connecticut 
Frederick L. Cronan, '39 

Purchasing Agent 

City of New Haven, Connecticut 

James M. DeFilippo, '70 

Deputy Inspector 

New Haven Police Department 
John N. Deming, '48 

Directory Sales Manager 

Southern New England Telephone 
Company 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Richard J. Drew, '75 

Self-employed 

Boston Noble Texaco Station 

Bridgeport, Connecticut 



John N. Duffy, '73 

Plant Manager 
Miles Laboratories, Inc. 
West Haven, Connecticut 
Joseph F. Duplinsky, '41 

President 

Connecticut Blue Cross, Inc. 

North Haven, Connecticut 

Stanley F. Durfee, '35 

Corporate Secretary 

Charles S. Leete Company, Inc. 

West Haven, Connecticut 

Eric S. Eklof, '73 

Engineer 

Stratton Corporation 

Stratton, Vermont 

Leslie C. Findell, '51 

President-General Manager 
Wilson Auto Sales, Inc. 
Branford, Connecticut 
Herman I. Galvin, '34 

Partner 

Axton-Cross Company 

North Haven, Connecticut 06473 
Martha Hargett, '70 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Michael J. Jackson, '73 

Field Engineer 

General Electric Company 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Arthur G. LaMontagne, Jr., 
'72 

Associate 

Arthur G. LaMontagne Realtors 

Branford, Connecticut 

Walter P. Macauley, '37 

Vice President 

Wyatt, Inc. 

New Haven, Connecticut 

George I. Mordecai, '55 

Senior Engineer 

Southern New England Telephone 

Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 



246 



John Perun, '62 

Jaymax Precision Products, Inc. 
Prospect, Connecticut 

Thomas B. Peterson, '52 

Vice President 

Connecticut Hard Rubber Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 
Thomas G. Piscitelli, '52 

Assistant Vice President and 
Hamden Brsinch Manager 
Union Trust Company 
Hamden, Connecticut 
Philip Ricciardi, '40 

President 

Refractory Metals Electrofinishing 

Corporation 
White Plains, New York 



Arthur G. Roetting, '36 

Retired 

Woodbridge, Connecticut 06525 

Eugene J. Rosazza, '39 

Retired 

North Haven, Connecticut 

Edward D. Taddei, GRI, '46 

President 

The Barrows and Wallace Company 

Hartford, Connecticut 

Frank H. Woodman, '47 

President 

Ives Division, Leigh Products, Inc. 

New Haven, Connecticut 

Charles E. Woods, '51 

President 

New Haven Water Company 

New Haven, Connecticut 



ENGINEERING ADVISORY COUNCIL 

The purpose of the Engineering Advisory Council is to act in an 
advisory and consultative capacity to the engineering departments 
of the university. 



R. J. Ottenheimer, Chairman 

Director, Engineering 
Armstrong Rubber Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 

Richard J. Greet, Secretary 

Acting Chairman 

Department of Mechanical 
Engineering 

University of New Haven 
John L. Banks 

Senior Staff Engineer 

Avco-Lycoming 

Stratford, Connecticut 
Jorn Berg- Johnsen, Jr. 

Sales Engineer 

Grodfrey & Associates 

Hamden, Connecticut 

Samuel S. Board, Jr. 

Engineer, Research and 

Development 
Farrel Corporation Division 

U.S.M. 
Ansonia, Connecticut 



William O. DoU 

Vice President 

Cahn Engineering, Inc. 

Wallingford, Connecticut 

Clarence W. Dunham 

Associate Professor Emeritus, 

Civil Engineering 
Yale University 
New Haven, Connecticut 

WilUam S. Gere, Jr. 

Chairman 

Department of Industrial 
Engineering 

University of New Haven 
La"wrence B. Grew 

Professional Engineer 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Robert F. Hasler 

Chief Engineer 

American Cyanamid Co. 

Wallingford, Connecticut 



247 



Gerald J. Kirwin 

Chairman 

Electrical Engineering 

Department 
University of New Haven 

Konstantine C. Lambrakis 

Dean 

School of Engineering 

University of New Haven 

Ross M. Lanius, Jr. 

Chairman 

Department of Civil Engineering 

University of New Haven 

George A. Meinsen 

Manager of Industrial Engineering 
Cerro Wire & Cable Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 

Kenneth E. Neff 

Manager of Engineering 
The H. Wales Lines Co. 
Meriden, Connecticut 

John Salomon 

Superintendent of Production 
United Illuminating Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 

Paul F. Rivers, Jr. 

Engineering Manager 

Conrac Corporation 

Old Saybrook, Connecticut 

Howard Sawatzki 

Entoleter, Inc. 

New Haven, Connecticut 

Norbert E. Smyth 

Manager of Nuclear Engineering 

Analysis 
Electric Boat Division of Greneral 

Dynamics 
Groton, Connecticut 



Alexis N. Sommers 

Provost 

University of New Haven 
Ralph A. Spang 

City Engineer 

City of West Haven, Connecticut 
Russell G. Warner, Jr. 

Vice President 

C. Cowles & Company 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Thomas C. Warner, Jr. 

Professor 

Department of Mechanical 

Engineering 
University of New Haven 
Jack F. Weiffenbach 
Vice President 
Research and Engineering 
Olin Corporation 
New Haven, Connecticut 

Frank E. Wollensack 

General Manager of Engineering 
Southern New England Telephone 

Co. 
New Haven, Connecticut 

Felix Zweig 

Professor of Engineering and 

Applied Science 
Yale University 
New Haven, Connecticut 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT ADVISORY 
COUNCIL 



Joseph Amendola 

Vice President 

The Culinary Institute of America, 

Inc. 
Hyde Park, New York 



Louis Bartenbach 

Research Chef 

General Foods Corporation 

Tarrytown, New York 



248 



Betty Bentz 

Co-Administrator 

New York Hotel/Motel Trades 

Council and Hotel Association 
New York, New York 

Salvatore Calenese 

Educational Director 
Industry Training Program 
New York, New York 

Robert V. Canning 
Vice President 
Connecticut Steel Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 

Edward Drew 

Manager 

Quinnipiack Club 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Alfred Goldsmid 

Consultant 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Dr. Doris Johnson 

Consultant 

Hamden, Connecticut 



Robert Meyer Jr. 

Yankee Silversmith Inn 

Wallingford, Connecticut 
Arno B. Schmidt 

Executive Chef 

The Waldorf-Astoria 

New York, New York 
Fred A. Smith, Director 

Saga Food Service 

University of Vermont 

Burlington, Vermont 

Joseph P. Tonetti 

Food Management Consultant 

Torrington, Connecticut 
Brother Herman E. 
Zaccarelli, C.S.C. 

Director of Educational Research and 

Development 
Cahners Books 
Boston, Massachusetts 



MANAGEMENT CENTER ADVISORY 
COUNCIL 



Geoffrey Etherington, 

Chairman 

President 

Etherington Industries 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Warren Smith, Secretary 

Acting Director 

Management Center 

University of New Haven 
Charles J. Anderson 

President, First Federal Savings and 
Loan Association of New Haven 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Alexander S. Basil 

Vice President 

Cerro Wire and Cable Division Cerro 
Corporation 

New Haven, Connecticut 



Walter J. Coleman 

Manager of Industrial and 

Community Affairs 
New Haven Chamber of Commerce 
New Haven, Connecticut 
Thomas E. Gunnoud, Jr. 
Personnel and Training 

Administrator 
The Anaconda American 

Brass 
Company 
Waterbury, Connecticut 

James Haury 

Assistant General Foreman 
Farrel Company 
Division of USM Corporation 
Ansonia, Connecticut 



249 



Phillip Kaplan 

President 

University of New Haven 
Ann M. Massimino 

Training Director 

United Illuminating Company 

New Haven, Connecticut 



William J. McGonagil 

General Manager 
Joseph T. Ryerson and Son, Inc. 
Wallingford, Connecticut 
Charles J. Sobolewski 
Vice President and CJeneral Manager 
Winchester Western Division Olin 

Corporation 
New Haven, Connecticut 



NEW PRODUCTS AND CONCEPTS 
LABORATORY ADVISORY COUNCIL 



Jim Mann, Director 

New Products and Concepts 
Laboratory 

University of New Haven 

President, Jim Mann and Associates 

Ramsey, New Jersey 
David Brumbaugh 

Executive Vice-President (Retired) 

Time, Inc. 
David Culbertson 

President 

Xerox Education Group 

Xerox Corporation 
Georges Didisheim 

Chairman of Board 

Waltham Watch Company 

Joseph Fahey, Jr. 

President 

State National Bank 
Paul Garrity 

President 
Garrity Industries 
Ted Gordon 

President 

The Futures Group 
Anderson S. Hewitt 

Consultant 

Founder of Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson 
and Mather Agency 

James Lynch 

Vice-President 
Associated Merchandising 
Corporation 



Clarence (Bud) MacNelly 

Portrait Artist 

Former Publisher of the 
Saturday Evening Post 
Charles Mapes 

President 

COMPLAN 
William Ogden 

Executive Vice-President 

Chase-Manhattan Bank 
Theodore J. Olsen 

Vice-President for Administration 

Olin Corporation 

Fred Papert 

Chairman of Board 
PKL Companies, Inc. 
Founder of Papert, Koenig, and Lois 
Advertising Agency 
H. Ford Perine 

President 

Brand Names Foundation 
Frank Rich 

President 

F. D. Rich Construction Company 
Ed Smith 

President 

Threshold Technology, Inc. 
Sylvester (Pat) Weaver 

Communications Consultant 
Former Chairman of Board, NBC 



250 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION ADVISORY 
COUNCIL 



Roger W. Boyd, Chairman 

President 

Connecticut Association of Municipal 

Development Commissions 
Vice President 
Union Trust Co. 

John Coleman, Secretary 

Chairman 

Department of Public Administration 

and Institutional Management 
University of New Haven 
Robert H. Franklin 
Executive Director 
Connecticut Public Expenditure 
CouncU, Inc. 

Frank Mc Coy 

President 

Connecticut Conference of Mayors 

Mayor 

Town of Vernon 

Phillip Kaplan 

President 

University of New Haven 
Francis J. Kelly 

Controller 

City of New Haven 
Joseph I. Lieberman 

Attorney 

State Senator, 11th District 

New Haven 

Donald Pogue 

Chairman 

New Haven Central Labor Council 
Education Committee 



Norris C. Andrews 

Executive Director 
Regional Planning Agency of South 
Central Connecticut 
Richard Custer 

President 

International City Manager's 

Association 
Town Manager 
Town of West Hartford 

Leroy Jones 

Executive Director 
New Haven Redevelopment 
Authority 

John Harkins 

President 

Connecticut Town and City 

Managers' Association 
Town Manager 
Town of Tolland 
Dennis Rezendes 
President 
Community Research and 

Development Corporation 
Hartford, Conn. 
Belden H. Schaffer 
Director 

The Institute of Public Service 
University of Connecticut 

Sandra Biloon 

Deputy Personnel Commissioner 
State of Connecticut 
Orest T. Dubno 

Deputy Tax Commissioner 
State of Connecticut 



SOCIAL WELFARE ADVISORY COUNCIL 



Lynne M. Healy 

Executive Director 

NASW Connecticut Chapters, 

Hartford, Connecticut 



Walter O. Jewell, III 

Chairman 

Department of Sociology and 

Social Welfare 
University of New Haven 



251 



Thomas Jordan 

Director of Community Services and 

Training 
Greater Bridgeport Regional 

Narcotics Program 
Bridgeport, Connecticut 

Pauline Lang 

Director of the Division of 

Social Work 
Southern Connecticut State College 
New Haven, Connecticut 

Thomas Reyes 

Student 

Social Welfare Concentration 

University of New Haven 



Douglas Robillard 

Dean 

School of Arts and Sciences 

University of New Haven 
Peter A. Rogers 

Director of Minority Student Affairs 

University of New Haven 
Alexis N. Sommers 

Provost 

University of New Haven 
Michael J. Wynne 

Coordinator 

Social Welfare Concentration 

University of New Haven 



WNHU ADVISORY COUNCIL 



Joseph J. Cieplak, 

Co-chairman 

Associate Director of Public Relations 

University of New Haven 
James DuU, Co-chairman 

Assistant Professor 
Political Science Department 
University of New Haven 
Radio Commentator 
New Haven, Connecticut 

Richard L. Gelgauda 

General Manager 

WNHU 

University of New Haven 
John W. Ghoreyeb 

Dean of Students 

University of New Haven 
Thomas D. Gilfort 

Chief Engineer 

WNHU 

University of New Haven 

Carl Grande 

General Manager 
WNHC 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Susan Granger 
Professional Broadcaster and Writer 
New Haven, Connecticut 



Robert Herpe 

General Manager 
WPLR 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Gerald J. Kirwin 
Chairman 

Electrical Engineering Department 
University of New Haven 

Frank Moore 

General Manager 

WELI 

New Haven, Connecticut 

Al Pellegrino 

General Manager 
WPOP 

Hartford, Connecticut 
Maureen T. Piatt 

Chairman 

Communications Board 
University of New Haven 

Ted Quayle 

General Manager 

WCDQ 

Hamden, Connecticut 

Vinny Roberts 

General Manager 

WFIF 

Milford, Connecticut 



252 



Shir lee S chaffer 

Commentator and Writer 

WELI 

New Haven, Connecticut 

Member of the Board of Governors 

University of New Haven 

Richard P. Schumeyer, Jr. 

Chief Engineer 

WAVZ 

New Haven, Connecticut 



J. Russell Sharpe 

Station Manager 

WNHU 

University of New Haven 

George R. Tiernan 

Attorney at Law 
New Haven, Connecticut 
Secretary of the Board of Governors 
University of New Haven 
Laurel Vlock 
Television Producer 
New Haven, Connecticut 



FACULTY 

FACULTY ORGANIZATION 



General Committee 

Chairman of the Faculty 
Secretary of the Faculty 
Chairman, Board of Faculty Welfare 



To be elected 
Donald M. Smith 
Caroline Dinegar 



Faculty Senate 

Chairman 

Vice Chairman 

Secretary 

Chairman of Senate Committees: 

Academic Standards 

Budget and Development 

Commencement and Convocations 

Curriculum 

Faculty-Student Relations 

Instruction 

Library 

Non-Academic Affairs 



To be elected 

Stephen Grodzinsky 

Donald M. Smith 

Daniel O'Keefe 

Gerald J. Kirwin 

Walter O. Jewell, III 

Robert T. Howling 

Allen Sack 

To be appointed 

Bertrand M. Mathieu 

Donald Wynschenk 



Board of Faculty Welfare 

Chairman 
Secretary 



Caroline Dinegar 
Dennis Courtney 



Sabatical Leave Committee 

Chairman 



To be appointed 
253 



Tenure and Promotion Committee 

Chairman Caroline Dinegar 

Secretary to the Faculty Carol Munro 

FACULTY 1975-1976 

Arnold, Joseph J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Baker, Samuel M., Jr., Associate Professor, English 

B.A., Guilford College; B.S., M.A., University of North Carolina 

Bechir, M. Hamdy, Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., Cairo University; M.A. Sc, University of Toronto; Sc.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Beeken, Ramona, Assistant Professor, English 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State College; M.A., Trinity College 

Bell, Srilekha, Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., M.A., University of Madras; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin 

Berglund, Jerry W., Assistant Professor, Mechanical 
Engineering 

B.S., Cooper Union; M.S., Columbia University; Ph.D., 

Polytechnic of Brooklyn 

Bernard, Joseph F., Jr., Assistant Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola University; M.A., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Yale 
University 

Blaskey, Joel W., Instructor, Science and Biology 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State College; M.A., Fairfield 
University; M.S., University of Bridgeport 

Bradshaw, Alfred, Associate Professor, Sociology 
B.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Brown, David, Professor, Psychology 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.A., Columbia University Con- 
sulting Psychologist (Licensed, Conn.) 

Burns, Donald, Assistant Professor, Physical Education 
B.S., University of Connecticut; M.A., Teachers' College, 
Columbia University 

254 



Carriuolo, Ralf E., Associate Professor, Humanities 
B.A., Yale University; M.M., Hartt College; Ph.D., Wesleyan 
University 

Carson, George R., Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., City College, New York; M.S.C.E., Columbia University; 
Professional Engineer (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, 
New Jersey) Landscape Architect (Connecticut) 

Chandra, Satish, Associate Professor, International Business 
B.A., University of Delhi; M. A., Delhi School of Economics; LL.B. , 
Lucknow Law School, India; LL.M., J.S.D., Yale University 

Chepaitis, Joseph, Associate Professor, History 
A.B., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 

Chin, Deborah, Instructor, Physical Education 

B.S.E., State University of New York at Courtlant; M.S.P.E., 
University of North Carolina 

Chun, Kee W., Professor, Physics 
A.B., University of Pennsylvania; A.M., Princeton University; 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Clifford, Frank M., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.B. A., University of New Haven 

Cole, Carroll P., Associate Professor, English 
B.A., Principia College; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University; 
M.F.A., D.F.A., Yale University 

Coleman, John, Assistant Professor, Management 
B.S.E., University of Connecticut; M.S.I.E., University of 
Massachusetts 

Collinson, John, Professor, Humanities 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University; A.M., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

Connery, Matthew, Instructor, Management Science 

B.S., M.S., Hofstra University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Costello, Francis J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Newark College of Engineering 

Courtney, Dennis, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Wayne State University; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University; Consulting Psychologist (Licensed, Connecticut) 

255 



Desio, Peter J., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

Devine, John E., Instructor, Fine Arts 
B.A., M.F.A., Yale University 

Dinegar, Caroline, Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Dull, James, Assistant Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Wilkes College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Eikaas, Faith H., Professor, Sociology 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Elliott, Frank, A.S., Instructor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S., University of New Haven 

Farrow, William R., Instructor, Physical Education 
B.S., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., Southern 
Connecticut State College 

Ferringer, Natalie, Assistant Professor, Political Science 
B.S., Temple University; M.A., University of Virginia 

Fidler, Howard, Assistant Professor, Hotel Management 

B.S., New York University; M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Flaumenhaft, Frank, Assistant Professor, Management Science 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., New York University 

French, Bruce A., Assistant Professor, English 

A.B., University of Missouri; M.A., Western Reserve University; 
M.A., Middlebury College; M.A., Harvard University 

Fryer, Johnnie, Assistant Professor 

B.A., University of Connecticut; M.S., Southern Connecticut 
State College 

Gangler, Joseph M., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia 
University 

George, Edward T., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; D. Engr., Yale 
University 

Gere, William S., Jr., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S.M.E., M.S.I.E., Cornell University, M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie 
Mellon University 

256 



Ghoreyeb, John W., Associate Professor, Arts and Sciences 
B.A., Yale University; M.A., Columbia University 

Greet, Richard J., Associate Professor, Materials Engineering 
B.E.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Grodzinsky, Stephen, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 
S.B., S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois 

Haberman, Ronald A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S.A.E., Pennsylvania State University; M.S.O.R., Florida 
Institute of Technology 

Hamel, Earl O., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 
A.B., Marietta College 

Harricharan, Wilfred, Associate Professor, Political Science 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Harrison, Robert D., Assistant Professor, Political Science 

A.B., Amherst; M.A., Columbia; J.D., Yale University; Ph.D., 
Columbia University 

Hoffnung, Robert J., Associate Professor, Psychology 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., 
University of Cincinnati 

Horning, Darrell W., Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 
B.S.E.E., S.D. School of Mines; M.S.E.E., Ph.D., University of 
Illinois 

Howling, Robert T., Professor, English 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., 
Penn. State University 

Hull, Frank G., Associate Professor, Accounting 
B.S., Yale University 

Hyman, Arnold, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; M.S., City College of New York; 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Jensen, Gwendolyn E., Associate Professor, History 

B.A., University of Hartford; M.A., Trinity College; Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

Jewell, Walter O., Ill, Associate Professor, Sociology 
A.B., Harvard College; Ph.D., Harvard Graduate School 

257 



Jordan, Camille, Visiting Assistant Professor, English 
B.A., Dillard University; A.M., University of Chicago 

Kakahk, John, Associate Professor, Marketing/International 
Business 

B.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Kalma, Dennis L., Assistant Professor, Science and Biology 
B.A., Knox College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 

Kaplan, Nathaniel, Professor, English 
A.B., Randolph-Macon College; M.S., Southern Connecticut State 
College 

Kaplan, Phillip S., Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University; 
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

Karatzas, George, Associate Professor, Economics 
B.A., Manchester University; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Katsaros, Thomas, Professor, History 

B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Kirwin, Gerald J., Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Northeastern University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Kranyik, Cynthia, Instructor, Industrial Engineering 

B.A., University of Bridgeport; M.S., University of New Haven 

Kravet, Robert, Instructor, Accounting 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State College; B.S., University of 
New Haven; M.S., University of Massachusetts, C.P.A. 
(Connecticut) 

Lambrakis, Konstantine C, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., University of Bridgeport; Ph.D., Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute 

Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 
B.S.C.E., University of Delaware; M.S.C.E., University of 
Connecticut Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Lee, Henry, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

A. A., Manhattan Community College; B.A., Taiwan Central 
Police College; B.S., John Jay College of Criminal Justice; M.S., 
Ph.D., New York University 

258 



Lemaire, Henry, Associate Professor, Chemistry 
S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., California 
Institute of Technology 

Lobay, Ivan, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
Dipl., Ing., Institute of Technology, Brno, Czechoslovakia; M.E., 
Central University of Venezuela, Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Logan, Larry, Instructor, Accounting 
B.A., Holy Cross College; M.S.B.A., University of Massachusetts, 
C.P.A. (Conn.) 

Machnik, Joseph A., Associate Professor, Physical Education 
B.S., M.S., Long Island University; Ph.D., University of Utah 

Maifeo, Edward J., Assistant Professor, Fine Arts 
B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design; M.A., Columbia 
University 

Maillard, Charles A., Jr., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
A.B., Southwest Missouri State College; J.D., St. Louis 
University (on sabbatical 1975-1976) 

Mandour, Ahmed R., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., American University of Cairo; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of 
Oklahoma 

Mann, Richard A., Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S., Northwestern University; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Professional Engineer 
(Wisconsin) 

Martin, John C, Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.E., M.E., Yale University, Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Marx, Paul, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., 
New York University 

Mathieu, Bertrand M., Associate Professor, English 
B.A., Nasson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Arizona 

McCrohan, Kevin, Assistant Professor, Marketing/International 
Business 

B.S., New York University; M.B.A., Baruch College; Certificate 

of Philosophy, City University of New York 

McGee, Frank, Jr., Assistant Professor, Public Administration 
A.B., Merrimeck College; M.P.A., Maxwell School, S5rracuse 
University 

259 



Meier, Robert D., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.S., Ursinus College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Mentzer, Thomas Lee, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.S., Penn State University; M.S., Ph.D., Brown University 

Meyer, John C, Jr., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., State University of New York, Stony Brook; M.A., State 
University of New York, Albany 

Millen, Roger N., Associate Professor, Management Science 
B.S., M.S., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Purdue 
University 

Moffitt, Elizabeth J., Associate Professor, Fine Arts 
B.F.A., Yale University; M.A., Hunter College 

Monahan, L)nin, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., McGill University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oregon 

Montague, Richard A., Assistant Professor, Industrial 
Engineering 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.S. I.E., Columbia University 

Morrison, Richard C, Professor, Physics 

A.B., Princeton University; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 

Murillo, Robert, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.A., M.A., The University of New Mexico 

Naccarato, David, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., St. Mary of the Plains College; M.A., Wichita State 
University 

Nsish, Thomas, Assistant Professor, Communication 

B.S., John Brown University; M.A., Michigan State University 

Nordlund, Kai K., Associate Professor, Finance 

LL.B., University of Helsinki; LL.M., Columbia University; 
D.J.S., New York Law School 

Nyce, William H., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.S.Ch.E., University of Pennsylvania; M.S., Southern 
Connecticut State College 

O'Keefe, Daniel, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 
B.E.E., City College of New York; M.S.E.E., Carnegie Mellon 
University; Ph.D., Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

Olgin, Philip, Professor, Education 
B.S., Ed.M., Ed.D., Rutgers University 

260 



Ormrod, Donald, Associate Professor, Physical Education 

B.S., University of Massachusetts; M.S., Southern Connecticut 
State College 

Paelet, David, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.S., M.S., City College of New York; Ph.D., University of Con- 
necticut 

Parker, Joseph, Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklsihoma 

Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 
A.B., Bates College, M.Ed., Springfield College; Ph.D., State 
University of New York at Buffalo 

Pearson, Edwin, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; LL.M., Harvard 
Law School; J.D., Georgetown University Law Center 

Petersen, Willard, Assistant Professor, Economics 

B.A., Yale University; M.B.A., Tuck School of Business 
Administration, Dartmouth College 

Plotnick, Alan, Professor, Economics 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania 

Reams, Dinwiddle C, Jr., Professor, Science and Biology 
B.Ch.E., University of Virginia; M.Eng., D.Eng., Yale 
University 

Reimer, Richard, Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.B.A., University of Commerce, Vienna; M.S., Columbia 
University, C.P.A., (Conn.) 

Rich, Anne, Assistant Professor, Accounting 
B.A., Queens College; M.B.A., University of Bridgeport, C.P.A., 
(Conn.) 

Robillard, Douglas, Professor, English 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Wajoie State University 

Robin, Gerald D,, Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania 

Ross, Bertram, Professor, Mathematics 

M.S., Wilkes College; M.S., Ph.D., Courant Institute of 
Mathematical Sciences, New York University, Professional 
Engineer (New York, Ohio) 

261 



Rowe, James S., Jr., Instructor, Management Science 
M.Ed., State University of New York at Buffalo 

Ryan, Daniel, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.A., Providence College; J.D., St. John's University 

Sack, Allen, Assistant Professor, Sociology 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Penn State 
University 

Saleeby, Buddy B., Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
B.S.M.E., Cooper Union; M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Northwestern 
University 

Sandman, Joshua, Assistant Professor, Political Science 
B.A., M.A., New York University 

Sawhney, Shiv. L., Associate Professor, Marketing/International 
Business 

B.A., LL.B., Delhi University; M.B.A., Ph.D., New York 
University 

Schaefer, George, Assistant Professor, Business Administration 
B.S., University of Rochester; M.B.A, University of Bridgeport 

Scholl, William L., Associate Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Davidson College; M.Div., Union Theological Seminary 

Sherwood, Franklin B., Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Il- 
linois 

Silbert, Louis, Assistant Professor, Management Science 
B.S., M.B.A., University of Hartford 

Smith, Donald M., Assistant Professor, English 
A.B., Guilford College; A.M., Columbia University 

Smith, W£irren J., Associate Professor, Business Administration 
B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., Northeastern 
University 

Sommers, Alexis N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., 
Purdue University 

Stanley, Richard M., Associate Professor, Mathematics 

B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins University; M.S., M. Phil., Ph.D., Yale 
University 

262 



Staugaard, Burton C, Professor, Science and Biology 

A.B., Brown University; M.S., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

Surti, Kantilal K., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 
B.E., University of Gujarat, India; M.E.E., University of 
Delaware; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Teluk, John, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Graduate School of Economics, Munich; B.S., University of 
New Haven; M.A., Free University, Munich 

Theilman, Ward, Associate Professor, Economics 
B.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

T3aidall, Bruce, Associate Professor, Mathematics 
B.A., M.S., University of Iowa 

Vasileff, Henry D., Associate Professor, Finance 

B.A., M.A., University of Toronto; M.B.A., University of Con- 
necticut; Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Vieira, Florindo, Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

B.S., Quinnipiac College; M.S., Southern Connecticut State 
College 

VoegeU, Henry E., Assistant Professor, Science and Biology 

B.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Rhode 
Island 

Warner, Thomas C, Jr., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., Yale University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Wentworth, Ronald N., Assistant Professor, Management 

B.S.M.E., Northeastern University, M.S.I.E., University of 
Massachusetts 

White, William, Instructor, Transitional Studies 
B.A., Union College; M.S., S3rracuse University 

Whiteman, Gilbert, Associate Professor, Communications 

B.E., University of Nebraska; M.A., University of Oklahoma; 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Wiener, Bernard, Associate Professor, Marketing 
B.S., M.B.A., New York University 

263 



Williams, Jeffrey L., Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.B.A., University of 
Bridgeport 

Wilson, Ned B., Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Wright, H. Fessenden, Professor, Science and Biology 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 
F.A.I.C., Registered Chemical Consultant 

Wjnine, Michael J., Assistant Professor, Sociology 

B.A., Fairfield University; M.S.S.A., Case Western Reserve 

Wynschenk, Donald, Assistant Professor, Health and Physical 
Education 
B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Yanover, Ruth W., Associate Professor, Marketing 
B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin 

York, Michael W., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland 

Zern, Martin M., Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.S., New York University; LL.B., Brooklyn Law School; 
LL.M., New York University 

Zingale, Paul, Assistant Professor, Management 

B.A., University of Rochester; M.A., University of Minnesota 



264 



% *^ 




INDEX 



Academic Calendar iv 

Academic Scholarships 26 

Academic Standards 15 

Accident Insurance 36 

Accounting Courses, Desc 146 

Accounting Major 145 

Accreditations and Memberships ... .3 
Administration, Officers, and 

Staff 237 

Admission 9 

Procedure 10 

Transfers 19 

Advanced Placement 3 

Advanced Study 18 

Advisory Councils 246 

Affirmative Action 3 

Aid Applications 26 

Alumni Association 32 

Advisory Council 33 

Advisory Council 

Membership 33 

Application Forms 10 

Art Courses, Desc 78 

Art Major .78 

Arts and Sciences, School of .43 

Admission Requirements 9 

Associate Degree 5 

Majors 

Biology 49 

Chemistry 61 

Commercial and Advertising 

Art 77 

General Studies 45 

Journalism 91 

Bachelor Degree 5 

Areas of Study 

Anthropology 127 

Art 77 

Biology 49 

Chemistry 60 

Economics 159 

English 67 

Environmental Studies 49 

Fire Science 82 

History 86 

Legal Affairs 117 

Mathematics 93 

Occupational Safety and 

Health 107 

Philosophy 108 

Physics " 103 

Political Science Ill 

Psychology 121 

Public Affairs 117 

Sociology 125 

Social Welfare 125 

Teacher Education 135 

World Music 99 

Associate Degree Programs 

Arts and Science 45 

Business Administration 140 

Engineering 192 

Athletic Activities 40 



Attendance Regulations 18 

Awards and Scholarships 26 

Biology Courses, Desc 51 

Biology Major 49 

Board of Governors 235 

Bookstore 39 

Bursary Work 31 

Business Administration, 

School of 139 

Areas of Study 

Accounting 144 

Business Administration 140 

Communication 149 

Criminal Justice 154 

Correctional 

Administration 154 

Forensic Science 158 

Criminal Justice 

Administration 154 

Economics 159 

Finance 164 

Hotel Administration 168 

International Business 172 

Management Science 177 

Marketing 173 

Operations Mansigement 180 

Personnel Management 180 

Public Administration 186 

Retailing 176 

Cooperative Program in 

Economics 142 

Minors . . . .• 143 

Cafeteria I 38 

CalendEU", Academic iv 

Career Development 34 

Changes in An-angements 26 

Changes in Registration 11 

Chemistry Courses, Desc 62 

Chemistry Major 61 

Civil Engineering Courses, 

Desc 196 

Civil Engineering Program 194 

College Level Examination 

Program 3 

Clubs and Organizations 37 

College Work-Study 31 

Commercial and Advertising Art . . .77 
Communication Courses, 

Desc 66, 151 

Communication Major 150 

Computer Center 38 

Continuing Education 6 

Counseling and Testing 35 

Course Changes 25 

Courses, Desc. 

Accounting 146 

Art 78 

Biology and Science 51 

Business Law 167 

Chemistry 62 

Civil Engineering 196 

Communications 151 

Criminal Justice 155 



267 



Economics 161 

Electrical Engineering 204 

Engineering Science 192 

English 69 

Finance 165 

Fire Science 84 

Foreign Languages 68 

History 86 

Hotel Administration 169 

Industrial Engineering 213 

International Business 173 

Journalism 91 

Management Science 181 

Marketing 174 

Materials Engineering 232 

Mathematics 93 

Mechanical Engineering 227 

Music, World 99 

Philosophy 109 

Physical Education 138 

Physics 103 

Political Science 113 

Psychology 122 

Public Administration 188 

Quantitative Analysis 185 

Retailing 176 

Science and Biology 51 

Sociology and Social Welfare . . . .129 

Teacher Education 136 

Theater Arts 76 

World Music 100 

Courses at Other Colleges 20 

Crediting Examinations 4 

Credit Programs 

Criminal Justice Courses, Desc. . . .155 

Criminal Justice, Majors 155 

Cultural Activities 37 

Dean's List 17 

Degrees, Requirements for 17 

With Honors 17 

Dismissal 15 

Division of Special Studies 8 

Divisions of the University 5 

Graduate School 6 

Management Center 8 

Special Studies 8 

Summer School 7 

Undergraduate Credit 

Programs 5 

Day 9 

Evening .7 

Donor Scholarships 26 

Double Major 4 

Economics, Cooperative 

Program 193 

Economics Courses, Desc 161 

Economics Major 160 

Education, Teacher 135 

Electrical Engineering Courses, 

Desc 204 

Electrical Engineering Program . . .202 

Employment, Student 31 

Engineering Advisory Council 247 

Engineering, School of 191 

Admissions Requirements 193 



Aeronautical Technology 222 

Associate Degree 192 

Bachelor Degree 

Civil 194 

Computer Technology 209 

Electrical 202 

Industrial 209 

Materials 222 

Mechanical 223 

Common Freshman Year 194 

Interdisciplinary Programs 192 

Matriculation 193 

Professional Accreditation 194 

English Courses, Desc 69 

English Major 68 

Evening Programs 7 

Expenses 21, 24 

Faculty 254 

Organization 253 

Fees 21, 22 

Finance Major 165 

Financial Aid 26 

Fire Science Major 82 

FM Radio Station, 

WNHU 38 

Foreign Languages, 

Course Desc 74 

Foreign Language 

Requirements 68 

Foreign Student Adviser 40 

Fraternities and Sororities 37 

General Studies Major 45 

Grade Reports 14 

Grading System 13 

Graduate School 6 

Grants 29 

Health and Accident Insurance 36 

History Courses, Desc 87 

History Major 86 

History of the University 1 

Honors, Academic 17 

Hotel and Restaurant 
Administration 

Advisory Council 248 

Courses, Desc 169 

Major 169 

Housing 35 

Industrial Engineering Courses, 

Desc 213 

Industrial Engineering 209 

Infirmary 36 

Institutional Management 187 

Insurance 36 

International Business Courses, 

Desc 173 

International Business Major 173 

Interdisciplinary Program 192 

Intersession Program 8 

Journalism Courses, Desc 91 

Journalism Major 91 

Law Enforcement Assistance 30 

Library 39 

Loan Funds 29 

Management Center 8 

Advisory Council 249 



268 



Management Science Courses, 

Desc 181 

Management Science Major 178 

Marketing Courses, Desc 174 

Marketing Major 174 

Materials Engi. Courses, Desc 232 

Materials Engineering Major 221 

Mathematics Courses, Desc 94 

Mathematics Major 93 

Meal Plans 35 

Mechanical Engi. Courses, 

Desc 227 

Mechanical Engineering 

Program 220 

Minors 224 

Arts and Sciences 45 

Business Administration 143 

Minority Student Affairs 273 

Music Courses, Desc 100 

New Produttts and Concepts 

Laboratory Advisory 

Council 250 

Nutrition Minor 49 

Off-Campus Housing 36 

Off-Campus Programs 8 

On-Campus Housing 35 

Operations Management Major . . . .180 

Organizations and Clubs 37 

Payment of Bills 24 

Philosophy Courses, Desc 109 

Philosophy Major 108 

Physical Education Courses, 

Desc 138 

Physical Examination 36 

Physics Covu-ses, Desc 103 

Physics Major 103 

Placement Service 34 

Political Science Courses, Desc. . . .113 

PoUtical Science Major Ill 

Pre-Professional Programs 4 

Probation 15 

Program Change 24 

Psychology Coiu-ses, Desc 122 

Psychology Major 121 

Public Administration 186 

Course Descriptions 188 

Advisory Council 251 

Publications, Student 37 

Quantitative Analysis Courses, 

Desc 185 

Radio Station^ WNHU . . . . .38 

Readmission 16 

Refunds 25 

Registration 10 

Degree Students .10 

Non-Degree Students 12 

Registration Changes 11 

Requirements for Degrees 17 

Residence 35 

Residence Charges 23 

RetaiUng Courses, Desc 176 

Schedule Changes 24 

Scholarships 26 



Scholastic Regulations 13 

Academic Standards 15 

Advanced Study 19 

Associate in Science Degree with 

Honors 18 

Attendance Regulations 18 

Bachelor Degrees with Honors . . .17 
Courses Available at other 

Colleges 20 

Dean's List 17 

Degrees 17 

Dismissal 15 

Grade Reports 14 

Grading System 13 

Honors 17 

Probation 15 

Readmission 16 

Transfer of Credit 19 

Transfer Students 19 

Science and Biology Courses, 

Desc 51 

Social Activities 38 

Social Welfare Advisory 

Council 251 

Social Welfare Major 128 

Sociology and Soc. Wei. Courses, 

Desc 125 

Sociology Major 126 

Sororities and Fraternities 37 

Specieil Studies, Division of 8 

Special Committees 236 

Standing Committees 236 

Student Activities 32, 37 

Student Center 38 

Student Councils 37 

Student Employment 31 

Student Health Service 36 

Student Housing 35 

Student Publications 37 

Student Services 39 

Summer Sessions v 

Registration v 

Teacher Education 135 

Testing 33 

Theater Arts Courses, Desc 76 

Transfer Students 19 

Transferability of Credit 19 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 21 

Undergraduate Credit Programs 5 

Undergraduate Schools 6 

Arts and Sciences 43 

Business Administration 139 

Engineering 191 

Veterans Affairs 33 

Withdrawal 24 

WNHU Advisory Council 252 

WNHU, FM Radio Station 38 

Women's Affairs 34 

Work Study Program 31 

World Music Courses, Desc 100 

World Music Major 99 

Maps 268, 269 

Addendum 273 



269 



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